• Resources Home 🏠
  • Try SciSpace Copilot
  • Search research papers
  • Add Copilot Extension
  • Try AI Detector
  • Try Paraphraser
  • Try Citation Generator
  • April Papers
  • June Papers
  • July Papers

SciSpace Resources

What is a thesis | A Complete Guide with Examples

Madalsa

Table of Contents

A thesis is a comprehensive academic paper based on your original research that presents new findings, arguments, and ideas of your study. It’s typically submitted at the end of your master’s degree or as a capstone of your bachelor’s degree.

However, writing a thesis can be laborious, especially for beginners. From the initial challenge of pinpointing a compelling research topic to organizing and presenting findings, the process is filled with potential pitfalls.

Therefore, to help you, this guide talks about what is a thesis. Additionally, it offers revelations and methodologies to transform it from an overwhelming task to a manageable and rewarding academic milestone.

What is a thesis?

A thesis is an in-depth research study that identifies a particular topic of inquiry and presents a clear argument or perspective about that topic using evidence and logic.

Writing a thesis showcases your ability of critical thinking, gathering evidence, and making a compelling argument. Integral to these competencies is thorough research, which not only fortifies your propositions but also confers credibility to your entire study.

Furthermore, there's another phenomenon you might often confuse with the thesis: the ' working thesis .' However, they aren't similar and shouldn't be used interchangeably.

A working thesis, often referred to as a preliminary or tentative thesis, is an initial version of your thesis statement. It serves as a draft or a starting point that guides your research in its early stages.

As you research more and gather more evidence, your initial thesis (aka working thesis) might change. It's like a starting point that can be adjusted as you learn more. It's normal for your main topic to change a few times before you finalize it.

While a thesis identifies and provides an overarching argument, the key to clearly communicating the central point of that argument lies in writing a strong thesis statement.

What is a thesis statement?

A strong thesis statement (aka thesis sentence) is a concise summary of the main argument or claim of the paper. It serves as a critical anchor in any academic work, succinctly encapsulating the primary argument or main idea of the entire paper.

Typically found within the introductory section, a strong thesis statement acts as a roadmap of your thesis, directing readers through your arguments and findings. By delineating the core focus of your investigation, it offers readers an immediate understanding of the context and the gravity of your study.

Furthermore, an effectively crafted thesis statement can set forth the boundaries of your research, helping readers anticipate the specific areas of inquiry you are addressing.

Different types of thesis statements

A good thesis statement is clear, specific, and arguable. Therefore, it is necessary for you to choose the right type of thesis statement for your academic papers.

Thesis statements can be classified based on their purpose and structure. Here are the primary types of thesis statements:

Argumentative (or Persuasive) thesis statement

Purpose : To convince the reader of a particular stance or point of view by presenting evidence and formulating a compelling argument.

Example : Reducing plastic use in daily life is essential for environmental health.

Analytical thesis statement

Purpose : To break down an idea or issue into its components and evaluate it.

Example : By examining the long-term effects, social implications, and economic impact of climate change, it becomes evident that immediate global action is necessary.

Expository (or Descriptive) thesis statement

Purpose : To explain a topic or subject to the reader.

Example : The Great Depression, spanning the 1930s, was a severe worldwide economic downturn triggered by a stock market crash, bank failures, and reduced consumer spending.

Cause and effect thesis statement

Purpose : To demonstrate a cause and its resulting effect.

Example : Overuse of smartphones can lead to impaired sleep patterns, reduced face-to-face social interactions, and increased levels of anxiety.

Compare and contrast thesis statement

Purpose : To highlight similarities and differences between two subjects.

Example : "While both novels '1984' and 'Brave New World' delve into dystopian futures, they differ in their portrayal of individual freedom, societal control, and the role of technology."

When you write a thesis statement , it's important to ensure clarity and precision, so the reader immediately understands the central focus of your work.

What is the difference between a thesis and a thesis statement?

While both terms are frequently used interchangeably, they have distinct meanings.

A thesis refers to the entire research document, encompassing all its chapters and sections. In contrast, a thesis statement is a brief assertion that encapsulates the central argument of the research.

Here’s an in-depth differentiation table of a thesis and a thesis statement.

Aspect

Thesis

Thesis Statement

Definition

An extensive document presenting the author's research and findings, typically for a degree or professional qualification.

A concise sentence or two in an essay or research paper that outlines the main idea or argument.  

Position

It’s the entire document on its own.

Typically found at the end of the introduction of an essay, research paper, or thesis.

Components

Introduction, methodology, results, conclusions, and bibliography or references.

Doesn't include any specific components

Purpose

Provides detailed research, presents findings, and contributes to a field of study. 

To guide the reader about the main point or argument of the paper or essay.

Now, to craft a compelling thesis, it's crucial to adhere to a specific structure. Let’s break down these essential components that make up a thesis structure

15 components of a thesis structure

Navigating a thesis can be daunting. However, understanding its structure can make the process more manageable.

Here are the key components or different sections of a thesis structure:

Your thesis begins with the title page. It's not just a formality but the gateway to your research.

title-page-of-a-thesis

Here, you'll prominently display the necessary information about you (the author) and your institutional details.

  • Title of your thesis
  • Your full name
  • Your department
  • Your institution and degree program
  • Your submission date
  • Your Supervisor's name (in some cases)
  • Your Department or faculty (in some cases)
  • Your University's logo (in some cases)
  • Your Student ID (in some cases)

In a concise manner, you'll have to summarize the critical aspects of your research in typically no more than 200-300 words.

Abstract-section-of-a-thesis

This includes the problem statement, methodology, key findings, and conclusions. For many, the abstract will determine if they delve deeper into your work, so ensure it's clear and compelling.

Acknowledgments

Research is rarely a solitary endeavor. In the acknowledgments section, you have the chance to express gratitude to those who've supported your journey.

Acknowledgement-section-of-a-thesis

This might include advisors, peers, institutions, or even personal sources of inspiration and support. It's a personal touch, reflecting the humanity behind the academic rigor.

Table of contents

A roadmap for your readers, the table of contents lists the chapters, sections, and subsections of your thesis.

Table-of-contents-of-a-thesis

By providing page numbers, you allow readers to navigate your work easily, jumping to sections that pique their interest.

List of figures and tables

Research often involves data, and presenting this data visually can enhance understanding. This section provides an organized listing of all figures and tables in your thesis.

List-of-tables-and-figures-in-a-thesis

It's a visual index, ensuring that readers can quickly locate and reference your graphical data.

Introduction

Here's where you introduce your research topic, articulate the research question or objective, and outline the significance of your study.

Introduction-section-of-a-thesis

  • Present the research topic : Clearly articulate the central theme or subject of your research.
  • Background information : Ground your research topic, providing any necessary context or background information your readers might need to understand the significance of your study.
  • Define the scope : Clearly delineate the boundaries of your research, indicating what will and won't be covered.
  • Literature review : Introduce any relevant existing research on your topic, situating your work within the broader academic conversation and highlighting where your research fits in.
  • State the research Question(s) or objective(s) : Clearly articulate the primary questions or objectives your research aims to address.
  • Outline the study's structure : Give a brief overview of how the subsequent sections of your work will unfold, guiding your readers through the journey ahead.

The introduction should captivate your readers, making them eager to delve deeper into your research journey.

Literature review section

Your study correlates with existing research. Therefore, in the literature review section, you'll engage in a dialogue with existing knowledge, highlighting relevant studies, theories, and findings.

Literature-review-section-thesis

It's here that you identify gaps in the current knowledge, positioning your research as a bridge to new insights.

To streamline this process, consider leveraging AI tools. For example, the SciSpace literature review tool enables you to efficiently explore and delve into research papers, simplifying your literature review journey.

Methodology

In the research methodology section, you’ll detail the tools, techniques, and processes you employed to gather and analyze data. This section will inform the readers about how you approached your research questions and ensures the reproducibility of your study.

Methodology-section-thesis

Here's a breakdown of what it should encompass:

  • Research Design : Describe the overall structure and approach of your research. Are you conducting a qualitative study with in-depth interviews? Or is it a quantitative study using statistical analysis? Perhaps it's a mixed-methods approach?
  • Data Collection : Detail the methods you used to gather data. This could include surveys, experiments, observations, interviews, archival research, etc. Mention where you sourced your data, the duration of data collection, and any tools or instruments used.
  • Sampling : If applicable, explain how you selected participants or data sources for your study. Discuss the size of your sample and the rationale behind choosing it.
  • Data Analysis : Describe the techniques and tools you used to process and analyze the data. This could range from statistical tests in quantitative research to thematic analysis in qualitative research.
  • Validity and Reliability : Address the steps you took to ensure the validity and reliability of your findings to ensure that your results are both accurate and consistent.
  • Ethical Considerations : Highlight any ethical issues related to your research and the measures you took to address them, including — informed consent, confidentiality, and data storage and protection measures.

Moreover, different research questions necessitate different types of methodologies. For instance:

  • Experimental methodology : Often used in sciences, this involves a controlled experiment to discern causality.
  • Qualitative methodology : Employed when exploring patterns or phenomena without numerical data. Methods can include interviews, focus groups, or content analysis.
  • Quantitative methodology : Concerned with measurable data and often involves statistical analysis. Surveys and structured observations are common tools here.
  • Mixed methods : As the name implies, this combines both qualitative and quantitative methodologies.

The Methodology section isn’t just about detailing the methods but also justifying why they were chosen. The appropriateness of the methods in addressing your research question can significantly impact the credibility of your findings.

Results (or Findings)

This section presents the outcomes of your research. It's crucial to note that the nature of your results may vary; they could be quantitative, qualitative, or a mix of both.

Results-section-thesis

Quantitative results often present statistical data, showcasing measurable outcomes, and they benefit from tables, graphs, and figures to depict these data points.

Qualitative results , on the other hand, might delve into patterns, themes, or narratives derived from non-numerical data, such as interviews or observations.

Regardless of the nature of your results, clarity is essential. This section is purely about presenting the data without offering interpretations — that comes later in the discussion.

In the discussion section, the raw data transforms into valuable insights.

Start by revisiting your research question and contrast it with the findings. How do your results expand, constrict, or challenge current academic conversations?

Dive into the intricacies of the data, guiding the reader through its implications. Detail potential limitations transparently, signaling your awareness of the research's boundaries. This is where your academic voice should be resonant and confident.

Practical implications (Recommendation) section

Based on the insights derived from your research, this section provides actionable suggestions or proposed solutions.

Whether aimed at industry professionals or the general public, recommendations translate your academic findings into potential real-world actions. They help readers understand the practical implications of your work and how it can be applied to effect change or improvement in a given field.

When crafting recommendations, it's essential to ensure they're feasible and rooted in the evidence provided by your research. They shouldn't merely be aspirational but should offer a clear path forward, grounded in your findings.

The conclusion provides closure to your research narrative.

It's not merely a recap but a synthesis of your main findings and their broader implications. Reconnect with the research questions or hypotheses posited at the beginning, offering clear answers based on your findings.

Conclusion-section-thesis

Reflect on the broader contributions of your study, considering its impact on the academic community and potential real-world applications.

Lastly, the conclusion should leave your readers with a clear understanding of the value and impact of your study.

References (or Bibliography)

Every theory you've expounded upon, every data point you've cited, and every methodological precedent you've followed finds its acknowledgment here.

References-section-thesis

In references, it's crucial to ensure meticulous consistency in formatting, mirroring the specific guidelines of the chosen citation style .

Proper referencing helps to avoid plagiarism , gives credit to original ideas, and allows readers to explore topics of interest. Moreover, it situates your work within the continuum of academic knowledge.

To properly cite the sources used in the study, you can rely on online citation generator tools  to generate accurate citations!

Here’s more on how you can cite your sources.

Often, the depth of research produces a wealth of material that, while crucial, can make the core content of the thesis cumbersome. The appendix is where you mention extra information that supports your research but isn't central to the main text.

Appendices-section-thesis

Whether it's raw datasets, detailed procedural methodologies, extended case studies, or any other ancillary material, the appendices ensure that these elements are archived for reference without breaking the main narrative's flow.

For thorough researchers and readers keen on meticulous details, the appendices provide a treasure trove of insights.

Glossary (optional)

In academics, specialized terminologies, and jargon are inevitable. However, not every reader is versed in every term.

The glossary, while optional, is a critical tool for accessibility. It's a bridge ensuring that even readers from outside the discipline can access, understand, and appreciate your work.

Glossary-section-of-a-thesis

By defining complex terms and providing context, you're inviting a wider audience to engage with your research, enhancing its reach and impact.

Remember, while these components provide a structured framework, the essence of your thesis lies in the originality of your ideas, the rigor of your research, and the clarity of your presentation.

As you craft each section, keep your readers in mind, ensuring that your passion and dedication shine through every page.

Thesis examples

To further elucidate the concept of a thesis, here are illustrative examples from various fields:

Example 1 (History): Abolition, Africans, and Abstraction: the Influence of the ‘Noble Savage’ on British and French Antislavery Thought, 1787-1807 by Suchait Kahlon.
Example 2 (Climate Dynamics): Influence of external forcings on abrupt millennial-scale climate changes: a statistical modelling study by Takahito Mitsui · Michel Crucifix

Checklist for your thesis evaluation

Evaluating your thesis ensures that your research meets the standards of academia. Here's an elaborate checklist to guide you through this critical process.

Content and structure

  • Is the thesis statement clear, concise, and debatable?
  • Does the introduction provide sufficient background and context?
  • Is the literature review comprehensive, relevant, and well-organized?
  • Does the methodology section clearly describe and justify the research methods?
  • Are the results/findings presented clearly and logically?
  • Does the discussion interpret the results in light of the research question and existing literature?
  • Is the conclusion summarizing the research and suggesting future directions or implications?

Clarity and coherence

  • Is the writing clear and free of jargon?
  • Are ideas and sections logically connected and flowing?
  • Is there a clear narrative or argument throughout the thesis?

Research quality

  • Is the research question significant and relevant?
  • Are the research methods appropriate for the question?
  • Is the sample size (if applicable) adequate?
  • Are the data analysis techniques appropriate and correctly applied?
  • Are potential biases or limitations addressed?

Originality and significance

  • Does the thesis contribute new knowledge or insights to the field?
  • Is the research grounded in existing literature while offering fresh perspectives?

Formatting and presentation

  • Is the thesis formatted according to institutional guidelines?
  • Are figures, tables, and charts clear, labeled, and referenced in the text?
  • Is the bibliography or reference list complete and consistently formatted?
  • Are appendices relevant and appropriately referenced in the main text?

Grammar and language

  • Is the thesis free of grammatical and spelling errors?
  • Is the language professional, consistent, and appropriate for an academic audience?
  • Are quotations and paraphrased material correctly cited?

Feedback and revision

  • Have you sought feedback from peers, advisors, or experts in the field?
  • Have you addressed the feedback and made the necessary revisions?

Overall assessment

  • Does the thesis as a whole feel cohesive and comprehensive?
  • Would the thesis be understandable and valuable to someone in your field?

Ensure to use this checklist to leave no ground for doubt or missed information in your thesis.

After writing your thesis, the next step is to discuss and defend your findings verbally in front of a knowledgeable panel. You’ve to be well prepared as your professors may grade your presentation abilities.

Preparing your thesis defense

A thesis defense, also known as "defending the thesis," is the culmination of a scholar's research journey. It's the final frontier, where you’ll present their findings and face scrutiny from a panel of experts.

Typically, the defense involves a public presentation where you’ll have to outline your study, followed by a question-and-answer session with a committee of experts. This committee assesses the validity, originality, and significance of the research.

The defense serves as a rite of passage for scholars. It's an opportunity to showcase expertise, address criticisms, and refine arguments. A successful defense not only validates the research but also establishes your authority as a researcher in your field.

Here’s how you can effectively prepare for your thesis defense .

Now, having touched upon the process of defending a thesis, it's worth noting that scholarly work can take various forms, depending on academic and regional practices.

One such form, often paralleled with the thesis, is the 'dissertation.' But what differentiates the two?

Dissertation vs. Thesis

Often used interchangeably in casual discourse, they refer to distinct research projects undertaken at different levels of higher education.

To the uninitiated, understanding their meaning might be elusive. So, let's demystify these terms and delve into their core differences.

Here's a table differentiating between the two.

Aspect

Thesis

Dissertation

Purpose

Often for a master's degree, showcasing a grasp of existing research

Primarily for a doctoral degree, contributing new knowledge to the field

Length

100 pages, focusing on a specific topic or question.

400-500 pages, involving deep research and comprehensive findings

Research Depth

Builds upon existing research

Involves original and groundbreaking research

Advisor's Role

Guides the research process

Acts more as a consultant, allowing the student to take the lead

Outcome

Demonstrates understanding of the subject

Proves capability to conduct independent and original research

Wrapping up

From understanding the foundational concept of a thesis to navigating its various components, differentiating it from a dissertation, and recognizing the importance of proper citation — this guide covers it all.

As scholars and readers, understanding these nuances not only aids in academic pursuits but also fosters a deeper appreciation for the relentless quest for knowledge that drives academia.

It’s important to remember that every thesis is a testament to curiosity, dedication, and the indomitable spirit of discovery.

Good luck with your thesis writing!

Frequently Asked Questions

A thesis typically ranges between 40-80 pages, but its length can vary based on the research topic, institution guidelines, and level of study.

A PhD thesis usually spans 200-300 pages, though this can vary based on the discipline, complexity of the research, and institutional requirements.

To identify a thesis topic, consider current trends in your field, gaps in existing literature, personal interests, and discussions with advisors or mentors. Additionally, reviewing related journals and conference proceedings can provide insights into potential areas of exploration.

The conceptual framework is often situated in the literature review or theoretical framework section of a thesis. It helps set the stage by providing the context, defining key concepts, and explaining the relationships between variables.

A thesis statement should be concise, clear, and specific. It should state the main argument or point of your research. Start by pinpointing the central question or issue your research addresses, then condense that into a single statement, ensuring it reflects the essence of your paper.

You might also like

Boosting Citations: A Comparative Analysis of Graphical Abstract vs. Video Abstract

Boosting Citations: A Comparative Analysis of Graphical Abstract vs. Video Abstract

Sumalatha G

The Impact of Visual Abstracts on Boosting Citations

Introducing SciSpace’s Citation Booster To Increase Research Visibility

Introducing SciSpace’s Citation Booster To Increase Research Visibility

The Savvy Scientist

The Savvy Scientist

Experiences of a London PhD student and beyond

Thesis Title: Examples and Suggestions from a PhD Grad

Graphic of a researcher writing, perhaps a thesis title

When you’re faced with writing up a thesis, choosing a title can often fall to the bottom of the priority list. After all, it’s only a few words. How hard can it be?!

In the grand scheme of things I agree that picking your thesis title shouldn’t warrant that much thought, however my own choice is one of the few regrets I have from my PhD . I therefore think there is value in spending some time considering the options available.

In this post I’ll guide you through how to write your own thesis title and share real-world examples. Although my focus is on the PhD thesis, I’ve also included plenty of thesis title examples for bachelor’s and master’s research projects too.

Hopefully by the end of the post you’ll feel ready to start crafting your own!

Why your thesis title is at least somewhat important

It sounds obvious but your thesis title is the first, and often only, interaction people will have with your thesis. For instance, hiring managers for jobs that you may wish to apply for in the future. Therefore you want to give a good sense of what your research involved from the title.

Many people will list the title of their thesis on their CV, at least for a while after graduating. All of the example titles I’ve shared below came from my repository of academic CVs . I’d say roughly 30% of all the academics on that page list their thesis title, which includes academics all the way up to full professor.

Your thesis title could therefore feature on your CV for your whole career, so it is probably worth a bit of thought!

My suggestions for choosing a good thesis title

  • Make it descriptive of the research so it’s immediately obvious what it is about! Most universities will publish student theses online ( here’s mine! ) and they’re indexed so can be found via Google Scholar etc. Therefore give your thesis a descriptive title so that interested researchers can find it in the future.
  • Don’t get lost in the detail . You want a descriptive title but avoid overly lengthy descriptions of experiments. Unless a certain analytical technique etc was central to your research, I’d suggest by default* to avoid having it in your title. Including certain techniques will make your title, and therefore research, look overly dated, which isn’t ideal for potential job applications after you graduate.
  • The title should tie together the chapters of your thesis. A well-phrased title can do a good job of summarising the overall story of your thesis. Think about each of your research chapters and ensure that the title makes sense for each of them.
  • Be strategic . Certain parts of your work you want to emphasise? Consider making them more prominent in your title. For instance, if you know you want to pivot to a slightly different research area or career path after your PhD, there may be alternative phrasings which describe your work just as well but could be better understood by those in the field you’re moving into. I utilised this a bit in my own title which we’ll come onto shortly.
  • Do your own thing. Having just laid out some suggestions, do make sure you’re personally happy with the title. You get a lot of freedom to choose your title, so use it however you fancy. For example, I’ve known people to use puns in their title, so if that’s what you’re into don’t feel overly constrained.

*This doesn’t always hold true and certainly don’t take my advice if 1) listing something in your title could be a strategic move 2) you love the technique so much that you’re desperate to include it!

Thesis title examples

To help give you some ideas, here are some example thesis titles from Bachelors, Masters and PhD graduates. These all came from the academic CVs listed in my repository here .

Bachelor’s thesis title examples

Hysteresis and Avalanches Paul Jager , 2014 – Medical Imaging – DKFZ Head of ML Research Group –  direct link to Paul’s machine learning academic CV

The bioenergetics of a marine ciliate, Mesodinium rubrum Holly Moeller , 2008 – Ecology & Marine Biology – UC Santa Barbara Assistant Professor –  direct link to Holly’s marine biology academic CV

Functional syntactic analysis of prepositional and causal constructions for a grammatical parser of Russian Ekaterina Kochmar , 2008 – Computer Science – University of Bath Lecturer Assistant Prof –  direct link to Ekaterina’s computer science academic CV

Master’s thesis title examples

Creation of an autonomous impulse response measurement system for rooms and transducers with different methods Guy-Bart Stan , 2000 – Bioengineering – Imperial Professor –  direct link to Guy-Bart’s bioengineering academic CV

Segmentation of Nerve Bundles and Ganglia in Spine MRI using Particle Filters Adrian Vasile Dalca , 2012 – Machine Learning for healthcare – Harvard Assistant Professor & MIT Research Scientist –  direct link to Adrian’s machine learning academic CV

The detection of oil under ice by remote mode conversion of ultrasound Eric Yeatman , 1986 – Electronics – Imperial Professor and Head of Department –  direct link to Eric’s electronics academic CV

Ensemble-Based Learning for Morphological Analysis of German Ekaterina Kochmar , 2010 – Computer Science – University of Bath Lecturer Assistant Prof –  direct link to Ekaterina’s computer science academic CV

VARiD: A Variation Detection Framework for Color-Space and Letter-Space Platforms Adrian Vasile Dalca , 2010 – Machine Learning for healthcare – Harvard Assistant Professor & MIT Research Scientist –  direct link to Adrian’s machine learning academic CV

Identification of a Writer’s Native Language by Error Analysis Ekaterina Kochmar , 2011 – Computer Science – University of Bath Lecturer Assistant Prof –  direct link to Ekaterina’s computer science academic CV

On the economic optimality of marine reserves when fishing damages habitat Holly Moeller , 2010 – Ecology & Marine Biology – UC Santa Barbara Assistant Professor –  direct link to Holly’s marine biology academic CV

Sensitivity Studies for the Time-Dependent CP Violation Measurement in B 0 → K S K S K S at the Belle II-Experiment Paul Jager , 2016 – Medical Imaging – DKFZ Head of ML Research Group –  direct link to Paul’s machine learning academic CV

PhD thesis title examples

Spatio-temporal analysis of three-dimensional real-time ultrasound for quantification of ventricular function Esla Angelini  – Medicine – Imperial Senior Data Scientist –  direct link to Elsa’s medicine academic CV

The role and maintenance of diversity in a multi-partner mutualism: Trees and Ectomycorrhizal Fungi Holly Moeller , 2015 – Ecology & Marine Biology – UC Santa Barbara Assistant Professor –  direct link to Holly’s marine biology academic CV

Bayesian Gaussian processes for sequential prediction, optimisation and quadrature Michael Osborne , 2010 – Machine Learning – Oxford Full Professor –  direct link to Michael’s machine learning academic CV

Global analysis and synthesis of oscillations: a dissipativity approach Guy-Bart Stan , 2005 – Bioengineering – Imperial Professor –  direct link to Guy-Bart’s bioengineering academic CV

Coarse-grained modelling of DNA and DNA self-assembly Thomas Ouldridge , 2011– Bioengineering – Imperial College London Senior Lecturer / Associate Prof –  direct link to Thomas’ bioengineering academic CV

4D tomographic image reconstruction and parametric maps estimation: a model-based strategy for algorithm design using Bayesian inference in Probabilistic Graphical Models (PGM) Michele Scipioni , 2018– Biomedical Engineer – Harvard Postdoctoral Research Fellow –  direct link to Michele’s biomedical engineer academic CV

Error Detection in Content Word Combinations Ekaterina Kochmar , 2016 – Computer Science – University of Bath Lecturer Assistant Prof –  direct link to Ekaterina’s computer science academic CV

Genetic, Clinical and Population Priors for Brain Images Adrian Vasile Dalca , 2016 – Machine Learning for healthcare – Harvard Assistant Professor & MIT Research Scientist –  direct link to Adrian’s machine learning academic CV

Challenges and Opportunities of End-to-End Learning in Medical Image Classification Paul Jager , 2020 – Medical Imaging – DKFZ Head of ML Research Group –  direct link to Paul’s machine learning academic CV

K 2 NiF 4  materials as cathodes for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells Ainara Aguadero , 2006 – Materials Science – Imperial Reader –  direct link to Ainara’s materials science academic CV

Applications of surface plasmons – microscopy and spatial light modulation Eric Yeatman , 1989 – Electronics – Imperial Professor and Head of Department –  direct link to Eric’s electronics academic CV

Geometric Algorithms for Objects in Motion Sorelle Friedler , 2010 – Computer science – Haverford College Associate Professor –  direct link to Sorelle’s computer science academic CV .

Geometrical models, constraints design, information extraction for pathological and healthy medical image Esla Angelini  – Medicine – Imperial Senior Data Scientist –  direct link to Elsa’s medicine academic CV

Why I regret my own choice of PhD thesis title

I should say from the outset that I assembled my thesis in quite a short space of time compared to most people. So I didn’t really spend particularly long on any one section, including the title.

However, my main supervisor even spelled out for me that once the title was submitted to the university it would be permanent. In other words: think wisely about your title.

What I started with

Initially I drafted the title as something like: Three dimensional correlative imaging for cartilage regeneration . Which I thought was nice, catchy and descriptive.

I decided to go for “correlative imaging” because, not only did it describe the experiments well, but it also sounded kind of technical and fitting of a potential pivot into AI. I’m pleased with that bit of the title.

What I ended up with

Before submitting the title to the university (required ahead of the viva), I asked my supervisors for their thoughts.

One of my well intentioned supervisors suggested that, given that my project didn’t involve verifying regenerative quality, I probably shouldn’t state cartilage regeneration . Instead, they suggested, I should state what I was experimenting on (the materials) rather than the overall goal of the research (aid cartilage regeneration efforts).

With this advice I dialled back my choice of wording and the thesis title I went with was:

Three dimensional correlative imaging for measurement of strain in cartilage and cartilage replacement materials

Reading it back now I’m reminder about how less I like it than my initial idea!

I put up basically no resistance to the supervisor’s choice, even though the title sounds so much more boring in my opinion. I just didn’t think much of it at the time. Furthermore, most of my PhD was actually in a technique which is four dimensional (looking at a series of 3D scans over time, hence 4D) which would have sounded way more sciency and fitting of a PhD.

What I wish I’d gone with

If I had the choice again, I’d have gone with:

Four-dimensional correlative imaging for cartilage regeneration

Which, would you believe it, is exactly what it states on my CV…

Does the thesis title really matter?

In all honesty, your choice of thesis title isn’t that important. If you come to regret it, as I do, it’s not the end of the world. There are much more important things in life to worry about.

If you decide at a later stage that you don’t like it you can always describe it in a way that you prefer. For instance, in my CV I describe my PhD as I’d have liked the title to be. I make no claim that it’s actually the title so consider it a bit of creative license.

Given that as your career progresses you may not even refer back to your thesis much, it’s really not worth stressing over. However, if you’re yet to finalise your thesis title I do still think it is worth a bit of thought and hopefully this article has provided some insights into how to choose a good thesis title.

My advice for developing a thesis title

  • Draft the title early. Drafting it early can help give clarity for the overall message of your research. For instance, while you’re assembling the rest of your thesis you can check that the title encompasses the research chapters you’re included, and likewise that the research experiments you’re including fall within what the title describes. Drafting it early also gives more time you to think it over. As with everything: having a first draft is really important to iterate on.
  • Look at some example titles . Such as those featured above!
  • If you’re not sure about your title, ask a few other people what they think . But remember that you have the final say!

I hope this post has been useful for those of you are finalising your thesis and need to decide on a thesis title. If you’ve enjoyed this article and would like to hear about future content (and gain access to my free resource library!) you can subscribe for free here:

Share this:

  • Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)

Related Posts

Image with a title showing 'How to make PhD thesis corrections' with a cartoon image of a man writing on a piece of paper, while holding a test tube, with a stack of books on the desk beside him

Minor Corrections: How To Make Them and Succeed With Your PhD Thesis

2nd June 2024 2nd June 2024

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Notify me of follow-up comments by email.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed .

Privacy Overview

Thesis Title Generator for Research & Dissertations

Need an original thesis topic or looking for inspiration? Our thesis title generator is here!

Search results for " "

Please try again with some different keywords.

  • 🧷️ Why Use It?
  • 🧠 Thesis Title: How-to

🏷️ References

🧷 why use the thesis title maker.

So you want to come up with a name for your capstone or dissertation, and you don’t know where to start? Not an issue! We have just the perfect tool for you – our thesis title maker.

This tool has plenty of features that any student will find helpful:

🆓 It’s free One of the best things about our thesis topic generator is that every student can access it without any payment. Enjoy the online tool anytime for free.
⌛ It saves time This instrument is extremely efficient – it requires mere seconds to develop . Check it out for yourself: copy your text, paste it into the tool, wait for several seconds and get the result.
👀 It’s versatile Once the tool gets your keywords, it searches for ideas all over the Internet. It can develop titles for any subject by browsing various , libraries, and articles. You might feel that there are too many topics. Yet, it is better to have more options than fewer.
🤝 It’s handy If you are unsure how to start a paper on a given subject, our tool offers some help for you as well. Of course, it is totally up to you whether to use this opportunity or not.
🦄 It boosts your imagination Sometimes you are exhausted and lack creativity. How great is it to have a tool that will provide you with options? Try it out!

🧠 How to Generate a Research Title?

Formulating the perfect title can be a difficult task, especially when working on your Master’s or PhD thesis . You probably already have plenty of thoughts that you’ll need to organize . Besides, you may lack proper words to describe your idea in full. In this section, we will help you do just that.

You can use the following ideation techniques to develop a perfect thesis title.

This method can give you a fresh perspective on any topic in six steps:

  • Describe the idea you already have.
  • Compare it to a random issue, listing all the similarities and differences.
  • Search for associations related to everything you wrote.
  • Analyze your ideas, considering how you can apply each of them (that’s the fifth part!).
  • Elaborate on each concept’s relevance and provide its pros and cons.

Brainstorming

Though it's an effective way to generate a list of ideas, you will require a group to use it. Call your friends and start a brainstorming session : offer ideas and build on each other’s suggestions. Try to take every concept seriously! If you think the idea seems strange, write it down to evaluate later.

Freewriting

Freewriting is much more intense, but it gives its results. It is all about the flow of random thoughts. Sit down with a sheet of paper and a pen and write down everything that comes to your mind. Do you have one idea and lots of complaints about it? Write your train of thought anyway. Additionally, try to set a time limit not to spend ages on one concept.

Sometimes, you can’t express what you’re thinking about in mere words. Drawing diagrams , graphs, or sketches may lead you in the right direction. Illustrate your topic roughly to allow your brain to rest and produce fresh ideas in a new visual form.

Mind mapping

It is a graphical method that allows you to focus on your associations and the relationships between concepts. There are two ways to do it:

  • Take notes of words and phrases related to the topic . Make sure you do it on a large sheet of paper since you should fit as many relevant expressions as possible. After that, connect the ideas that support your topic and see how you can explore these links.
  • Develop ideas and make a web of thoughts simultaneously . This way, you will outline the topic based on the connections rather than separate concepts. You can start by placing a word in the middle and drawing several lines from it.

Ideation may get confusing, especially when you’re already dealing with grand ideas and challenging tasks. That’s why our Master’s and PhD thesis title generator is of great use for hard-working students.

Thanks for reading the article! Now you can benefit from both our thesis topic generator and our tips on developing a project name. Share the tool with other students, and check the FAQ for more information.

💡 Dissertation Title Generator FAQ

💡 how do you create a thesis title.

Developing a thesis title requires time and careful thinking. To create a good one, focus on the main idea you can cover in your work. Decide on the keywords that determine your topic and research them to find the related concepts. They will help you find proper words to formulate your thesis title.

💡 What are some good topics for the thesis?

Topics for a Master’s or PhD thesis are only as good as your understanding of the subject you specialize in. Thus, each graduate student will have their personal excellent topic. You can check the existing academic paper titles for some incredible and successful ideas, especially the dissertation ones.

  • How to Choose Your Thesis Topic | Central European University
  • The Smart Way to Choose your Thesis Topic | Caroline Dale, The Thesis Coach
  • Useful Techniques: Ideation (Brainstorming) | Pfeiffer Library at Tiffin University
  • Tools for Brainstorming: Ideation | LibGuides at University of Akron
  • Recent Dissertation Titles: PhD Program in Biological Sciences in Public Health | Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

While Sandel argues that pursuing perfection through genetic engineering would decrease our sense of humility, he claims that the sense of solidarity we would lose is also important.

This thesis summarizes several points in Sandel’s argument, but it does not make a claim about how we should understand his argument. A reader who read Sandel’s argument would not also need to read an essay based on this descriptive thesis.  

Broad thesis (arguable, but difficult to support with evidence) 

Michael Sandel’s arguments about genetic engineering do not take into consideration all the relevant issues.

This is an arguable claim because it would be possible to argue against it by saying that Michael Sandel’s arguments do take all of the relevant issues into consideration. But the claim is too broad. Because the thesis does not specify which “issues” it is focused on—or why it matters if they are considered—readers won’t know what the rest of the essay will argue, and the writer won’t know what to focus on. If there is a particular issue that Sandel does not address, then a more specific version of the thesis would include that issue—hand an explanation of why it is important.  

Arguable thesis with analytical claim 

While Sandel argues persuasively that our instinct to “remake” (54) ourselves into something ever more perfect is a problem, his belief that we can always draw a line between what is medically necessary and what makes us simply “better than well” (51) is less convincing.

This is an arguable analytical claim. To argue for this claim, the essay writer will need to show how evidence from the article itself points to this interpretation. It’s also a reasonable scope for a thesis because it can be supported with evidence available in the text and is neither too broad nor too narrow.  

Arguable thesis with normative claim 

Given Sandel’s argument against genetic enhancement, we should not allow parents to decide on using Human Growth Hormone for their children.

This thesis tells us what we should do about a particular issue discussed in Sandel’s article, but it does not tell us how we should understand Sandel’s argument.  

Questions to ask about your thesis 

  • Is the thesis truly arguable? Does it speak to a genuine dilemma in the source, or would most readers automatically agree with it?  
  • Is the thesis too obvious? Again, would most or all readers agree with it without needing to see your argument?  
  • Is the thesis complex enough to require a whole essay's worth of argument?  
  • Is the thesis supportable with evidence from the text rather than with generalizations or outside research?  
  • Would anyone want to read a paper in which this thesis was developed? That is, can you explain what this paper is adding to our understanding of a problem, question, or topic?
  • picture_as_pdf Thesis
  • Affiliate Program

Wordvice

  • UNITED STATES
  • 台灣 (TAIWAN)
  • TÜRKIYE (TURKEY)
  • Academic Editing Services
  • - Research Paper
  • - Journal Manuscript
  • - Dissertation
  • - College & University Assignments
  • Admissions Editing Services
  • - Application Essay
  • - Personal Statement
  • - Recommendation Letter
  • - Cover Letter
  • - CV/Resume
  • Business Editing Services
  • - Business Documents
  • - Report & Brochure
  • - Website & Blog
  • Writer Editing Services
  • - Script & Screenplay
  • Our Editors
  • Client Reviews
  • Editing & Proofreading Prices
  • Wordvice Points
  • Partner Discount
  • Plagiarism Checker
  • APA Citation Generator
  • MLA Citation Generator
  • Chicago Citation Generator
  • Vancouver Citation Generator
  • - APA Style
  • - MLA Style
  • - Chicago Style
  • - Vancouver Style
  • Writing & Editing Guide
  • Academic Resources
  • Admissions Resources

How to Make a Research Paper Title with Examples

thesis related names

What is a research paper title and why does it matter?

A research paper title summarizes the aim and purpose of your research study. Making a title for your research is one of the most important decisions when writing an article to publish in journals. The research title is the first thing that journal editors and reviewers see when they look at your paper and the only piece of information that fellow researchers will see in a database or search engine query. Good titles that are concise and contain all the relevant terms have been shown to increase citation counts and Altmetric scores .

Therefore, when you title research work, make sure it captures all of the relevant aspects of your study, including the specific topic and problem being investigated. It also should present these elements in a way that is accessible and will captivate readers. Follow these steps to learn how to make a good research title for your work.

How to Make a Research Paper Title in 5 Steps

You might wonder how you are supposed to pick a title from all the content that your manuscript contains—how are you supposed to choose? What will make your research paper title come up in search engines and what will make the people in your field read it? 

In a nutshell, your research title should accurately capture what you have done, it should sound interesting to the people who work on the same or a similar topic, and it should contain the important title keywords that other researchers use when looking for literature in databases. To make the title writing process as simple as possible, we have broken it down into 5 simple steps.

Step 1: Answer some key questions about your research paper

What does your paper seek to answer and what does it accomplish? Try to answer these questions as briefly as possible. You can create these questions by going through each section of your paper and finding the MOST relevant information to make a research title.

“What is my paper about?”  
“What methods/techniques did I use to perform my study?
“What or who was the subject of my study?” 
“What did I find?”

Step 2: Identify research study keywords

Now that you have answers to your research questions, find the most important parts of these responses and make these your study keywords. Note that you should only choose the most important terms for your keywords–journals usually request anywhere from 3 to 8 keywords maximum.

-program volume
-liver transplant patients
-waiting lists
-outcomes
-case study

-US/age 20-50
-60 cases

-positive correlation between waitlist volume and negative outcomes

Step 3: Research title writing: use these keywords

“We employed a case study of 60 liver transplant patients around the US aged 20-50 years to assess how waiting list volume affects the outcomes of liver transplantation in patients; results indicate a positive correlation between increased waiting list volume and negative prognosis after the transplant procedure.”

The sentence above is clearly much too long for a research paper title. This is why you will trim and polish your title in the next two steps.

Step 4: Create a working research paper title

To create a working title, remove elements that make it a complete “sentence” but keep everything that is important to what the study is about. Delete all unnecessary and redundant words that are not central to the study or that researchers would most likely not use in a database search.

“ We employed a case study of 60 liver transplant patients around the US aged 20-50 years to assess how the waiting list volume affects the outcome of liver transplantation in patients ; results indicate a positive correlation between increased waiting list volume and a negative prognosis after transplant procedure ”

Now shift some words around for proper syntax and rephrase it a bit to shorten the length and make it leaner and more natural. What you are left with is:

“A case study of 60 liver transplant patients around the US aged 20-50 years assessing the impact of waiting list volume on outcome of transplantation and showing a positive correlation between increased waiting list volume and a negative prognosis” (Word Count: 38)

This text is getting closer to what we want in a research title, which is just the most important information. But note that the word count for this working title is still 38 words, whereas the average length of published journal article titles is 16 words or fewer. Therefore, we should eliminate some words and phrases that are not essential to this title.

Step 5: Remove any nonessential words and phrases from your title

Because the number of patients studied and the exact outcome are not the most essential parts of this paper, remove these elements first:

 “A case study of 60 liver transplant patients around the US aged 20-50 years assessing the impact of waiting list volume on outcomes of transplantation and showing a positive correlation between increased waiting list volume and a negative prognosis” (Word Count: 19)

In addition, the methods used in a study are not usually the most searched-for keywords in databases and represent additional details that you may want to remove to make your title leaner. So what is left is:

“Assessing the impact of waiting list volume on outcome and prognosis in liver transplantation patients” (Word Count: 15)

In this final version of the title, one can immediately recognize the subject and what objectives the study aims to achieve. Note that the most important terms appear at the beginning and end of the title: “Assessing,” which is the main action of the study, is placed at the beginning; and “liver transplantation patients,” the specific subject of the study, is placed at the end.

This will aid significantly in your research paper title being found in search engines and database queries, which means that a lot more researchers will be able to locate your article once it is published. In fact, a 2014 review of more than 150,000 papers submitted to the UK’s Research Excellence Framework (REF) database found the style of a paper’s title impacted the number of citations it would typically receive. In most disciplines, articles with shorter, more concise titles yielded more citations.

Adding a Research Paper Subtitle

If your title might require a subtitle to provide more immediate details about your methodology or sample, you can do this by adding this information after a colon:

“ : a case study of US adult patients ages 20-25”

If we abide strictly by our word count rule this may not be necessary or recommended. But every journal has its own standard formatting and style guidelines for research paper titles, so it is a good idea to be aware of the specific journal author instructions , not just when you write the manuscript but also to decide how to create a good title for it.

Research Paper Title Examples

The title examples in the following table illustrate how a title can be interesting but incomplete, complete by uninteresting, complete and interesting but too informal in tone, or some other combination of these. A good research paper title should meet all the requirements in the four columns below.

Advantages of Meditation for Nurses: A Longitudinal StudyYesNoNoYesYes
Why Focused Nurses Have the Highest Nursing ResultsNoYesYesNoYes
A Meditation Study Aimed at Hospital NursesNoNoNoNoYes
Mindfulness on the Night Shift: A Longitudinal Study on the Impacts of Meditation on Nurse ProductivityYesYesYesYesNo
Injective Mindfulness: Quantitative Measurements of Medication on Nurse Productivity YesYesYesYesYes

Tips on Formulating a Good Research Paper Title

In addition to the steps given above, there are a few other important things you want to keep in mind when it comes to how to write a research paper title, regarding formatting, word count, and content:

  • Write the title after you’ve written your paper and abstract
  • Include all of the essential terms in your paper
  • Keep it short and to the point (~16 words or fewer)
  • Avoid unnecessary jargon and abbreviations
  • Use keywords that capture the content of your paper
  • Never include a period at the end—your title is NOT a sentence

Research Paper Writing Resources

We hope this article has been helpful in teaching you how to craft your research paper title. But you might still want to dig deeper into different journal title formats and categories that might be more suitable for specific article types or need help with writing a cover letter for your manuscript submission.

In addition to getting English proofreading services , including paper editing services , before submission to journals, be sure to visit our academic resources papers. Here you can find dozens of articles on manuscript writing, from drafting an outline to finding a target journal to submit to.

Research Title Generator

We’ll help you brainstorm great title ideas for your essay, research or speech in no time!

Every piece of writing needs a title. It expresses the main idea, sets the right tone from the very beginning. Plus, a good title prepares the audience for what’s coming. Whether they are reading or listening to your presentation, it serves two purposes: intrigues and grabs the attention.

Most probably, you already have a lot on your plate. Coming up with a title may not be your priority at the moment. Looking for one online isn't practical as well. It wastes a lot of time and does not bring much-needed results. There are too many ideas on the Internet that can look engaging and fruitful but lack substance.

So, what’s the solution?

Use the speech and writing topic generator on IvyPanda ! Type a search term that you want to center your assignment around and click the “Generate ideas” button. Our idea generator will find a few titles that you can employ. The best part of it - it’s absolutely free!

You can use it for both speaking and writing assignments. Let’s say you want to start writing fiction in your leisure time. Our topic generator will help you to come up with story or chapter titles! Plus, check the tips below that can help you with composing and outlining anything.

  • 🎨 When Do You Need It?
  • 📚 Research Paper
  • 💡 Creative Writing

🔗 References

🎨 when do you need a topic generator.

Our topic generator is useful for various types of academic and non-academic writing. Plus, with its help, you can find a title for your upcoming public talk or presentation. Below, you’ll see for what purposes you can employ it:

  • Essay. The most popular reason to use an idea generator is to find a title for an essay. You can see a massive variety of topics connected by the keyword of your choice. Pick one or combine a few to get the best essay topic.
  • Research paper. Writing a research paper can be tricky. It requires a lot of research and attention to detail. Save your time for the most challenging part of it, and let our tool provide you with the best title. Spend your time researching and writing rather than coming up with a title.
  • Blog. Coming up with a blog post can be as bothersome as completing a though research. Whether you’re writing a game review or recalling your day, our tool can formulate a relevant title for you.
  • Drawing. Any artist can find themselves stuck in a corner, willing to create something, but lacking an idea. Our topic generator can save you all the trouble and propose a random drawing idea. Don’t be afraid of starting your draft with something that our tool provided. You’ll most definitely end up with an original result.
  • Creative writing. Are you striving to write but have no idea what to write about? Or you’ve already composed a piece and now looking for a suitable title? Then, our tool is for you. Use it as writing prompts generator to find a new plot point. Plus, pick a title for a chapter or even for a whole story. You’ll still have to use ideation sessions to develop the topics further, though.
  • Speech. To have a successful presentation, you need to have good public speaking skills. If you don’t have them, then you will have to spend most of your time practicing and memorizing the text, preparing your visual aid (PowerPoint presentation, infographics, etc.). You may lack time for crafting a title—so you our idea generator!

✨ How to Create an Outline?

Here are a few general pieces of advice for a good structure:

  • Define your goal (Why are you preparing this speech or writing?)
  • Determine your audience (Who is going to listen to you or read your paper?)
  • Decide on your topic and thesis (What are you trying to say?)

Depending on your assignment and the goals you are trying to achieve, you can use your outline differently. Here are some outline recommendations for you:

📝 Essay Outline

Having picked your essay topic, you can start the outlining process. To compose an appropriate structure, do the following:

  • Determine the type. The use of evidence and organization heavily relies on what kind of essay you’re working on. A persuasive essay requires a more factual approach as you’re trying to convince your reader. Hence your outline will include places for examples and proof. In an opinion essay, you won’t have to provide as much evidence your outline structure will be different too
  • Create a thesis statement. Stop typing or writing for a moment and consider what you’re trying to argue. Create a clear and concise statement that thoroughly reflects your idea. Make the first sentence its preview, which grabs the reader’s attention. Then, elaborate on the thesis in the following paragraphs, proving your point.
  • Choose the most prominent ideas. Make sure they are connected to your thesis. Use them to develop your paragraphs and argumentation. Introduce each one with a topic sentence at the beginning of the respective part of your essay.
  • Organize them in a logical order. The basic structure presents an idea for a paragraph, but the order will differ. The presentation of your points in a compare and contrast essay isn’t the same as that of the other ones.

📚 Research Paper Outline

The outline of a research paper is in some way similar to essay one. You still need a thesis statement, arguments that support it, and your evidence.

Nevertheless, there are some major differences too:

  • Introduction. Start with the attention grabber and a thesis sentence. Then, there is additional information that you can provide in this section. Give an overview of the subject and a justification for your work. Explain why you picked this specific topic. Elaborate on why it’s relevant and why your research and contribution are significant. In effect, you should give a preview of the whole work and explain your objectives.
  • Materials. In this section, elaborate on the existing theoretical framework. List the relevant works and thinkers, including some case studies that you find suitable. Explain what existing material you implemented in your research and why.
  • Methods. State your research questions and your method. Tell your reader why you’ve chosen this method in particular.
  • Results. Provide a list or a description of your findings. Use visual aid (charts, graphs, tables, etc.) to illustrate them but don’t present definitive statements.
  • Discussion. Provide your critical opinion regarding the topic and the discussions that are happening in the field. Offer your ideas and interpretations.
  • Limitations. Explain how you were restricted in your research and suggest what can be done next.
  • Conclusion. In the final part of your paper, provide a brief recap of what you studied and found. Recall your initial objectives and explain what you’ve accomplished. Give some recommendations for future research. Don’t forget to list all the references used in your paper and add acknowledgments, if necessary.

💡 Creative Writing Outline

As we stated earlier, you can use this topic generator for writing a short story or a novel. To ensure the natural flow and logical order of events, you need a good outline.

Before writing, answer these questions:

  • Who is the protagonist?
  • What are the circumstances in the beginning?
  • What is your protagonist’s goal?
  • Who is the opponent or antagonist?
  • What misfortune will happen?
  • What conflict will appear?

Whether you’re composing a story for an assignment, or writing your book for fun, answer the questions beforehand. Combine them in a couple of sentences to create a synopsis that will remind you of your premise.

Then, you need to prepare significant plot points in advance. List all the good ideas that you have, make a few drafts of the key scenes. If you want to present a plot twist, plan it early on and ensure that it doesn’t contradict the story.

Develop your secondary characters before you start writing. Give them personalities and objectives, invest them in the story. Let them support the growth of your main hero.

What’s more crucial:

Pay the closest attention to characterizing your protagonist and their opponent. They hold the plot together, so make them memorable and well defined. Try to give them an intriguing background and unique personalities.

Describe the settings of your story. You can set the tone from the beginning through the surroundings. If you’re writing a mystery, the gloomy weather can enforce the unsettling atmosphere. For a science-fiction short story, you can put your characters on the space ship and dive into action, and so on.

Planning an outline helps with fighting the writer’s block as you’ll always know what to write in the scene. For additional plot points, you can use an idea generator.

🗨️ Speech Outline

To create a structure for your presentation, you can follow the essay organization but make it more detailed. With a good outline, you won’t need to write your speech at all, delivering it seemingly impromptu.

So, the basic structure:

  • The introduction, where you preview what you’re going to say. Start with a hook that draws the attention of your audience. Show that you’re thinking differently. Continue with a topic and statement, which briefly expresses the core message. Make a natural transition to the central part.
  • The body paragraphs, where you tell your audience what you’ve intended to say. List the arguments that support your thesis with illustrative examples. The more reasonable your evidence is, the more your audience will agree with you. You can tell a story in the process of presenting your proof. Make your audience feel as if you are in conversation with them. This way, you can trick the human brain into paying more attention. Try to sound natural as well, as if a light bulb appears above your head every time you come up with a point.
  • The conclusion, where you sum up what you’ve said. Recap key arguments and emphasize your message once again. Call your public to action if appropriate. Don’t talk too fast. This part your listeners should remember long after you finished.

You can use our title generator to find new proof for your speech, as it relies on the keyword of your choice.

Your commemorative speech should depend on the event, your relation to the occasion, and your personal experience. So, topics on shared values prevail:

  • courage or goals of a person (Steve Jobs)
  • inspiring examples of success
  • prominent discoveries
  • historical events that significantly affected the world (9/11, WW2)

Surreal questions (What if elephants could fly and how it would affect the economy?) can be fun if done seriously. Quirky yet positive titles (The unwritten rules of men’s toilet) are also amusing. The sense of humor differs from person to person, so don’t try to impress everyone.

An appropriate humor can save a tedious topic.

Thanks for finishing the article. We hope you found the topic generator and our tips on outlines useful. Share it with those who may need it for their speaking or writing assignments.

Updated: Oct 25th, 2023

  • Easy Novel Outline: Free Writing Lessons and Worksheets
  • 7 Steps to Creating a Flexible Outline for Any Story: K.M. Weiland for Writer's Digest
  • Using Character Sheets in Fiction Writing: FreelanceWriting
  • 8 Basics of Creative Writing: Kurt Vonnegut, Gotham Writers Workshop
  • Outlining: David Kornhaber, for the Writing Center at Harvard University
  • Outlining, Writing a Paper: Academic Guides at Walden University
  • Outline the Paper, Research Process, A Step-by-Step Guide: Research Guides at Georgia Tech Library
  • Why and How to Create a Useful Outline: Purdue Online Writing Lab
  • Writing an Outline: Austin Community College
  • Speech Outline Examples and Tips [Persuasive, Informative]: My Speech Class
  • Speech Preparation, Speech Outline Examples: Andrew Dlugan for Six Minutes
  • Free Essays
  • Writing Tools
  • Lit. Guides
  • Donate a Paper
  • Referencing Guides
  • Free Textbooks
  • Tongue Twisters
  • Job Openings
  • Expert Application
  • Video Contest
  • Writing Scholarship
  • Discount Codes
  • IvyPanda Shop
  • Terms and Conditions
  • Privacy Policy
  • Cookies Policy
  • Copyright Principles
  • DMCA Request
  • Service Notice

Our random topic generator will be of great use in case you need to come up with an original title idea for an essay, research paper, speech, or presentation. Finding a worthy topic to write about can be tough, and our essay subject generator will set you free of this burden.

Free Research Name Generator

Type your search term

Stuck formulating a creative title for your research paper or essay? The free research name generator we've made! All you need to do is:

Do you need help developing an appealing research name for your essay assignment? Don't stress anymore! In three easy steps, you can create an attention-grabbing name for your research paper in a few minutes with the help of our free online research name generator.

  • Input your search term.
  • Click on the “search topic” button and pick one or more topics proposed by the research name generator.
  • Reload the list by clicking the search button again if you want more options.
  • 📝 Why Is a Research Name Important
  • 📍 Coming up with a Topic
  • 🪝 Making a Catchy Research Name

🔗 References

📝 research name - what it is & why it is important.

When looking for a research study on a specific topic, you are likelier to pick essays with catchy, descriptive research names that grab your attention. In contrast, the research paper headings that are less captivating or descriptive are easy to ignore, regardless of the content’s quality. That is why developing an excellent and noticeable title for your research paper is crucial.

So, what makes a good name for your essay?

Let's explore 4 characteristics of a quality research title:

Your research name should be as straightforward as possible so that others can understand your research. This means that your title should not be ambiguous to avoid confusing your readers about the details of your research.
Sometimes research paper writers phrase their titles in a way that gives a double-barreled impression of the text. A well-defined and adequately articulated heading makes it easy to grasp.
Your research heading should follow the . If you need to familiarize yourself with the rules, study them carefully before sharing your finished work.
Write your research name in a that everyone can understand. Avoid technical terms and jargon unless it is unavoidable.

Research Topic vs. Research Name

Although most people use these two terms interchangeably, it is essential to note that a research name is not similar to a research topic:

  • A research topic gives you a brief context of the research essay by displaying a sneak peek of the content. Topics are often long, sometimes two sentences long.
  • A research name is short and precise, equal to the text’s title. It does not show the context of the research paper.

📍 Coming up with a Research Topic

Writing an academic paper is a serious task requiring intense effort. One of the most critical parts of the entire process is coming up with a suitable heading for your paper. The name you choose for your research proposal, term paper, thesis, or dissertation determines your readers' enthusiasm toward the paper even before they dig into it.

Selecting a theme of your genuine interest is essential because it makes your writing process much easier and more enjoyable.

Here is how you come up with an exciting research topic :

  • Seek inspiration from other bodies of work in the same field by consuming as much information as possible regarding your research area. From your research, you will find a name that piques your interest and that of your readers.
  • Consider your target audience while writing your research paper name. Use language that is palatable and relatable to your readers. For example, the language relatable to an audience of medics differs from what an audience of lawyers might find suitable.
  • Be as straightforward as possible with your topic. A garbled and complicated topic is a huge turn-off for your readers, who will assume that your research paper is as complex as your title.
  • Avoid jargon on your research topic since it interferes with the clarity of the message. Try to stick to the basics unless it is vital, field-specific jargon.

🪝 How to Make a Catchy Research Name in 5 Steps

Choosing an appropriate topic for your paper should be the starting point of your writing process. It may be challenging to pick a title from all the content from your research work.

You may wonder:

  • What will make your research name appealing to the readers ?
  • How to write a heading that captures the essence of your work?

It may be a difficult task, but lucky for you, we are here to help with a few pointers.

1. Answer Some Fundamental Questions about Your Research Paper

You could start by answering the simple question: what issues does your paper address, or what does it seek to achieve? The brief answer to this question can create a relevant title for your research paper.

Let us explore some solutions and build up a title.

❓ Research question 💬 One-sentence answer
“What is my essay about?” "My paper studies the effects of long-term use of on the insulin production in patients living in New York."
“What techniques did I use to perform my research?” “It is a case study.”
“Who or what was the subject of my research study?” “I studied 30 cases of diabetic patients aged between 40 – 60 years old living in New York.”
“What were my findings?” “My research revealed a negative correlation between pain medication and insulin production.”

2. Identify Research Study Keywords

Having answered the questions, identify the essential parts of the answer and make them your keywords.

💬 One-sentence answer 🗝️ Keywords
"My paper studies the effects of long-term use of pain relieving medication on the insulin production in diabetic patients living in New York.”
"It is a case study."
“I studied 30 cases of diabetic patients aged between 40 – 60 years old living in New York.”
“My research revealed a negative correlation between pain medication and insulin production.”

3. Use the Keywords to Write Your Title

"We employed a case study of 30 diabetic patients in New York aged between 40 – 60 years to assess the effects of long-term use of pain medication on their insulin production; results revealed a negative correlation between the two."

4. Create a Realistic Research Paper Heading

To create a working title, delete all the unnecessary words that are not important to the study or that your readers would not include in their search.

“A case study of 30 diabetic patients in New York aged 40 – 60 years assessing the effects of pain medication on insulin production, revealing a negative correlation between the medication and insulin levels.” (Word count: 33)

We are drawing closer to a good research paper name.

5. Make Your Title Even Shorter

Since most of the qualitative and quantitative data will be included in the essay, there is no need to have the numbers on your title . Research techniques are also unnecessary in the title, so we can remove them. Let’s see what we have now:

“Assessing the effects of pain medication on diabetic patients” (Word count: 9)

One can immediately recognize the subject and its aims from the simple title. To save yourself the time to create this title, you can use our free online research paper name generator and have a list of catchy title ideas to choose from.

Consider trying other study instruments for students that we’ve made:

  • Thesis checker

❓ Name Generator FAQ

❓ what is a good research title.

A creative and catchy research title should be short, captivating, clear, and precise to attract a reader to the article. Our research name maker will help you create a great title.

❓ How do you create a research name?

It would help if you focused on the intended study outcome to compose a well-designed research name. What are you interested in? What parameter of your subject will you measure? All these questions give valuable pointers for creating the name of your study paper. If you’re running out of ideas and time, you can use our free research name checker to develop some catchy titles for your research paper.

❓ What are five examples of research paper names?

There are many types of research paper names, but you can use the five most popular versions for your paper. These are direct, how-to, question, the reason why, and two-part titles.

❓ What is a working title in research?

A working title should highlight the research problem and solution to guide the reader on what to expect from the essay.

  • How to write a good research paper title - Nature
  • Writing the title and abstract for a research paper - NCBI
  • Importance of Choosing a Good Title
  • A Title that Works: Characteristics and Tips
  • Selecting a Research Topic - LibGuides at MIT Libraries

What are your chances of acceptance?

Calculate for all schools, your chance of acceptance.

Duke University

Your chancing factors

Extracurriculars.

thesis related names

How to Write a Strong Thesis Statement: 4 Steps + Examples

thesis related names

What’s Covered:

What is the purpose of a thesis statement, writing a good thesis statement: 4 steps, common pitfalls to avoid, where to get your essay edited for free.

When you set out to write an essay, there has to be some kind of point to it, right? Otherwise, your essay would just be a big jumble of word salad that makes absolutely no sense. An essay needs a central point that ties into everything else. That main point is called a thesis statement, and it’s the core of any essay or research paper.

You may hear about Master degree candidates writing a thesis, and that is an entire paper–not to be confused with the thesis statement, which is typically one sentence that contains your paper’s focus. 

Read on to learn more about thesis statements and how to write them. We’ve also included some solid examples for you to reference.

Typically the last sentence of your introductory paragraph, the thesis statement serves as the roadmap for your essay. When your reader gets to the thesis statement, they should have a clear outline of your main point, as well as the information you’ll be presenting in order to either prove or support your point. 

The thesis statement should not be confused for a topic sentence , which is the first sentence of every paragraph in your essay. If you need help writing topic sentences, numerous resources are available. Topic sentences should go along with your thesis statement, though.

Since the thesis statement is the most important sentence of your entire essay or paper, it’s imperative that you get this part right. Otherwise, your paper will not have a good flow and will seem disjointed. That’s why it’s vital not to rush through developing one. It’s a methodical process with steps that you need to follow in order to create the best thesis statement possible.

Step 1: Decide what kind of paper you’re writing

When you’re assigned an essay, there are several different types you may get. Argumentative essays are designed to get the reader to agree with you on a topic. Informative or expository essays present information to the reader. Analytical essays offer up a point and then expand on it by analyzing relevant information. Thesis statements can look and sound different based on the type of paper you’re writing. For example:

  • Argumentative: The United States needs a viable third political party to decrease bipartisanship, increase options, and help reduce corruption in government.
  • Informative: The Libertarian party has thrown off elections before by gaining enough support in states to get on the ballot and by taking away crucial votes from candidates.
  • Analytical: An analysis of past presidential elections shows that while third party votes may have been the minority, they did affect the outcome of the elections in 2020, 2016, and beyond.

Step 2: Figure out what point you want to make

Once you know what type of paper you’re writing, you then need to figure out the point you want to make with your thesis statement, and subsequently, your paper. In other words, you need to decide to answer a question about something, such as:

  • What impact did reality TV have on American society?
  • How has the musical Hamilton affected perception of American history?
  • Why do I want to major in [chosen major here]?

If you have an argumentative essay, then you will be writing about an opinion. To make it easier, you may want to choose an opinion that you feel passionate about so that you’re writing about something that interests you. For example, if you have an interest in preserving the environment, you may want to choose a topic that relates to that. 

If you’re writing your college essay and they ask why you want to attend that school, you may want to have a main point and back it up with information, something along the lines of:

“Attending Harvard University would benefit me both academically and professionally, as it would give me a strong knowledge base upon which to build my career, develop my network, and hopefully give me an advantage in my chosen field.”

Step 3: Determine what information you’ll use to back up your point

Once you have the point you want to make, you need to figure out how you plan to back it up throughout the rest of your essay. Without this information, it will be hard to either prove or argue the main point of your thesis statement. If you decide to write about the Hamilton example, you may decide to address any falsehoods that the writer put into the musical, such as:

“The musical Hamilton, while accurate in many ways, leaves out key parts of American history, presents a nationalist view of founding fathers, and downplays the racism of the times.”

Once you’ve written your initial working thesis statement, you’ll then need to get information to back that up. For example, the musical completely leaves out Benjamin Franklin, portrays the founding fathers in a nationalist way that is too complimentary, and shows Hamilton as a staunch abolitionist despite the fact that his family likely did own slaves. 

Step 4: Revise and refine your thesis statement before you start writing

Read through your thesis statement several times before you begin to compose your full essay. You need to make sure the statement is ironclad, since it is the foundation of the entire paper. Edit it or have a peer review it for you to make sure everything makes sense and that you feel like you can truly write a paper on the topic. Once you’ve done that, you can then begin writing your paper.

When writing a thesis statement, there are some common pitfalls you should avoid so that your paper can be as solid as possible. Make sure you always edit the thesis statement before you do anything else. You also want to ensure that the thesis statement is clear and concise. Don’t make your reader hunt for your point. Finally, put your thesis statement at the end of the first paragraph and have your introduction flow toward that statement. Your reader will expect to find your statement in its traditional spot.

If you’re having trouble getting started, or need some guidance on your essay, there are tools available that can help you. CollegeVine offers a free peer essay review tool where one of your peers can read through your essay and provide you with valuable feedback. Getting essay feedback from a peer can help you wow your instructor or college admissions officer with an impactful essay that effectively illustrates your point.

thesis related names

Related CollegeVine Blog Posts

thesis related names

Free Research Title Generator

Looking for a creative and catchy title for a research proposal, thesis, dissertation, essay, or other project? Try our research title maker! It is free, easy to use, and 100% online.

Welcome to our free online research title generator. You can get your title in 3 simple steps:

  • Type your search term and choose one or more subjects from the list,
  • Click on the “Search topic” button and choose among the ideas that the title generator has proposed,
  • Refresh the list by clicking the button one more time if you need more options.

Please try again with some different keywords or subjects.

  • ️✅ Research Title Generator: 4 Benefits
  • ️👣 Making a Research Title in 3 Steps
  • ️🔗 References

Creating a topic for the research is one of the most significant events in a researcher’s life. Whether it is a thesis, dissertation, research proposal , or term paper, all of these assignments are time-consuming and require a lot of effort.

It is essential to choose a topic that you like and are genuinely interested in because you will spend a lot of time working on it. Our research title generator can help you with this crucial task. By delegating this work to our research title maker, you can find the best title for your research.

✅ Research Title Generator: 4 Benefits

There are many different research title makers online, so what makes our thesis title generator stand out?

🤑 It is 100% free You don’t have to spend money. You can use our service absolutely for free. Make as many titles as you want for an unlimited number of assignments and pages.
🌐 It is 100% online No need to take any free space on your laptop! The Internet has changed our lives and made studying convenient. There are many different online tools and checkers that you can use to study, and we are no exception.
🏆 It is 100% effective You don’t need to worry about your research’s title anymore. Our thesis title generator can do all the work for you. You can refresh your research title list as many times as you want to find a title that suits your work the best.
🌈 It is 100% intuitive Our research title generator is easy-to-use and functional. Try it out to check it yourself!

👣 How to Make a Research Title: 3 Simple Steps

Research can be the most stressful period in a student’s life. However, creating a title is not as hard as it may seem. You can choose a topic for your paper in three simple steps.

The picture describes the 3 steps of research title making process.

Step 1: Brainstorm

The first step to take before getting into your research is to brainstorm . To choose a good topic, you can do the following:

  • Think of all your interests related to your field of study. What is the reason you've chosen this field? Think of the topics of your area that you like reading about in your free time.
  • Go through your past papers and choose the ones you enjoyed writing. You can use some lingering issues from your previous work as a starting point for your research.
  • Go through current events in your field to get an idea of what is going on. Whether you are writing a literary analysis , gender studies research, or any other kind of paper, you can always find tons of articles related to your field online. You can go through them to see what issue is getting more attention.
  • Try to find any gaps in current researches in your field. Use only credible sources while searching. Try to add something new to your field with your research. However, do not choose a completely new issue.
  • Discuss what topic is suitable for you with your professors. Professor knows a lot of information about current and previous researches, so try to discuss it with them.
  • Discuss lingering issues with your classmates. Try to ask what questions do they have about your field.
  • Think of your desired future work . Your research might serve as a starting point for your future career, so think of your desired job.
  • Write down 5-10 topics that you might be interested in. Ph.D. or Master’s research should be specific, so write down all the appropriate topics that you came up with.

Step 2: Narrow It Down

As you are done brainstorming, you have a list of possible research topics. Now, it is time to narrow your list down.

Go through your list again and eliminate the topics that have already been well-researched before. Remember that you need to add something new to your field of study, so choose a topic that can contribute to it. However, try not to select a topic not researched at all, as it might be difficult.

Once you get a general idea of what your research will be about, choose a research supervisor. Think of a professor who is an expert in your desired area of research. Talk to them and tell them the reason why you want to work with them and why you chose this area of study.

As you eliminated some irrelevant topics and shortened your list to 1-3 topics, you can discuss them with your supervisor. Since your supervisor has a better insight into your field of study, they can recommend a topic that can be most suitable for you. Make sure to elaborate on each topic and the reason you chose it.

Step 3: Formulate a Research Question

The next step is to create a research question. This is probably the most important part of the process. Later you'll turn your research question into a thesis statement .

Learn as many materials as you can to figure out the type of questions you can ask for your research. Make use of any articles, journals, libraries, etc. Write notes as you learn, and highlight the essential parts.

First, make any questions you can think of. Choose the ones that you have an interest in and try to rewrite them. As you rewrite them, you can get a different perspective on each of the questions. An example of the potential question:

How did the economic situation in the 19th century affect literature?

Think of a question that you can answer and research best. To do it, think of the most convenient research process and available materials that you have access to. Do you need to do lab testing, quantitative analysis, or any kind of experiment? What skills do you have that can be useful?

Discuss the question that you came up with your supervisor. Get their feedback as they might have their own opinion on that topic and give you creative advice.

❓ Research Title Maker FAQ

❓ how to make a research title.

To make a research title:

  • Brainstorm your field of study first.
  • Think of the topics that you are interested in.
  • Research current events in your study area and discuss your possible topics with your professors and classmates.
  • Avoid random topics that are not well-researched.

❓ What is a working title for a research paper?

To make a good research paper title, analyze your area of study and all the related current events. Discuss your possible topics with your classmates and professors to get their opinion on them. You can also use our research title maker for free.

❓ What is the title page of a research paper?

The title page of the research paper is the first paper of your work. It includes your name, research type, and other essential information about your research.

❓ How to title a research proposal?

The research proposal title should be clear enough to showcase your research. Think of a statement that best describes your work and try to create a title that reflects it.

🔗 References

  • Research Topics | Frontiers
  • Organizing Your Social Sciences Research Paper
  • Strategies for Selecting a Research Topic - ResearchGate
  • The First Steps: Choosing a Topic and a Thesis Supervisor
  • How to Pick a Masters Thesis Topic | by Peter Campbell

The Writing Center • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Thesis Statements

What this handout is about.

This handout describes what a thesis statement is, how thesis statements work in your writing, and how you can craft or refine one for your draft.

Introduction

Writing in college often takes the form of persuasion—convincing others that you have an interesting, logical point of view on the subject you are studying. Persuasion is a skill you practice regularly in your daily life. You persuade your roommate to clean up, your parents to let you borrow the car, your friend to vote for your favorite candidate or policy. In college, course assignments often ask you to make a persuasive case in writing. You are asked to convince your reader of your point of view. This form of persuasion, often called academic argument, follows a predictable pattern in writing. After a brief introduction of your topic, you state your point of view on the topic directly and often in one sentence. This sentence is the thesis statement, and it serves as a summary of the argument you’ll make in the rest of your paper.

What is a thesis statement?

A thesis statement:

  • tells the reader how you will interpret the significance of the subject matter under discussion.
  • is a road map for the paper; in other words, it tells the reader what to expect from the rest of the paper.
  • directly answers the question asked of you. A thesis is an interpretation of a question or subject, not the subject itself. The subject, or topic, of an essay might be World War II or Moby Dick; a thesis must then offer a way to understand the war or the novel.
  • makes a claim that others might dispute.
  • is usually a single sentence near the beginning of your paper (most often, at the end of the first paragraph) that presents your argument to the reader. The rest of the paper, the body of the essay, gathers and organizes evidence that will persuade the reader of the logic of your interpretation.

If your assignment asks you to take a position or develop a claim about a subject, you may need to convey that position or claim in a thesis statement near the beginning of your draft. The assignment may not explicitly state that you need a thesis statement because your instructor may assume you will include one. When in doubt, ask your instructor if the assignment requires a thesis statement. When an assignment asks you to analyze, to interpret, to compare and contrast, to demonstrate cause and effect, or to take a stand on an issue, it is likely that you are being asked to develop a thesis and to support it persuasively. (Check out our handout on understanding assignments for more information.)

How do I create a thesis?

A thesis is the result of a lengthy thinking process. Formulating a thesis is not the first thing you do after reading an essay assignment. Before you develop an argument on any topic, you have to collect and organize evidence, look for possible relationships between known facts (such as surprising contrasts or similarities), and think about the significance of these relationships. Once you do this thinking, you will probably have a “working thesis” that presents a basic or main idea and an argument that you think you can support with evidence. Both the argument and your thesis are likely to need adjustment along the way.

Writers use all kinds of techniques to stimulate their thinking and to help them clarify relationships or comprehend the broader significance of a topic and arrive at a thesis statement. For more ideas on how to get started, see our handout on brainstorming .

How do I know if my thesis is strong?

If there’s time, run it by your instructor or make an appointment at the Writing Center to get some feedback. Even if you do not have time to get advice elsewhere, you can do some thesis evaluation of your own. When reviewing your first draft and its working thesis, ask yourself the following :

  • Do I answer the question? Re-reading the question prompt after constructing a working thesis can help you fix an argument that misses the focus of the question. If the prompt isn’t phrased as a question, try to rephrase it. For example, “Discuss the effect of X on Y” can be rephrased as “What is the effect of X on Y?”
  • Have I taken a position that others might challenge or oppose? If your thesis simply states facts that no one would, or even could, disagree with, it’s possible that you are simply providing a summary, rather than making an argument.
  • Is my thesis statement specific enough? Thesis statements that are too vague often do not have a strong argument. If your thesis contains words like “good” or “successful,” see if you could be more specific: why is something “good”; what specifically makes something “successful”?
  • Does my thesis pass the “So what?” test? If a reader’s first response is likely to  be “So what?” then you need to clarify, to forge a relationship, or to connect to a larger issue.
  • Does my essay support my thesis specifically and without wandering? If your thesis and the body of your essay do not seem to go together, one of them has to change. It’s okay to change your working thesis to reflect things you have figured out in the course of writing your paper. Remember, always reassess and revise your writing as necessary.
  • Does my thesis pass the “how and why?” test? If a reader’s first response is “how?” or “why?” your thesis may be too open-ended and lack guidance for the reader. See what you can add to give the reader a better take on your position right from the beginning.

Suppose you are taking a course on contemporary communication, and the instructor hands out the following essay assignment: “Discuss the impact of social media on public awareness.” Looking back at your notes, you might start with this working thesis:

Social media impacts public awareness in both positive and negative ways.

You can use the questions above to help you revise this general statement into a stronger thesis.

  • Do I answer the question? You can analyze this if you rephrase “discuss the impact” as “what is the impact?” This way, you can see that you’ve answered the question only very generally with the vague “positive and negative ways.”
  • Have I taken a position that others might challenge or oppose? Not likely. Only people who maintain that social media has a solely positive or solely negative impact could disagree.
  • Is my thesis statement specific enough? No. What are the positive effects? What are the negative effects?
  • Does my thesis pass the “how and why?” test? No. Why are they positive? How are they positive? What are their causes? Why are they negative? How are they negative? What are their causes?
  • Does my thesis pass the “So what?” test? No. Why should anyone care about the positive and/or negative impact of social media?

After thinking about your answers to these questions, you decide to focus on the one impact you feel strongly about and have strong evidence for:

Because not every voice on social media is reliable, people have become much more critical consumers of information, and thus, more informed voters.

This version is a much stronger thesis! It answers the question, takes a specific position that others can challenge, and it gives a sense of why it matters.

Let’s try another. Suppose your literature professor hands out the following assignment in a class on the American novel: Write an analysis of some aspect of Mark Twain’s novel Huckleberry Finn. “This will be easy,” you think. “I loved Huckleberry Finn!” You grab a pad of paper and write:

Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn is a great American novel.

You begin to analyze your thesis:

  • Do I answer the question? No. The prompt asks you to analyze some aspect of the novel. Your working thesis is a statement of general appreciation for the entire novel.

Think about aspects of the novel that are important to its structure or meaning—for example, the role of storytelling, the contrasting scenes between the shore and the river, or the relationships between adults and children. Now you write:

In Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain develops a contrast between life on the river and life on the shore.
  • Do I answer the question? Yes!
  • Have I taken a position that others might challenge or oppose? Not really. This contrast is well-known and accepted.
  • Is my thesis statement specific enough? It’s getting there–you have highlighted an important aspect of the novel for investigation. However, it’s still not clear what your analysis will reveal.
  • Does my thesis pass the “how and why?” test? Not yet. Compare scenes from the book and see what you discover. Free write, make lists, jot down Huck’s actions and reactions and anything else that seems interesting.
  • Does my thesis pass the “So what?” test? What’s the point of this contrast? What does it signify?”

After examining the evidence and considering your own insights, you write:

Through its contrasting river and shore scenes, Twain’s Huckleberry Finn suggests that to find the true expression of American democratic ideals, one must leave “civilized” society and go back to nature.

This final thesis statement presents an interpretation of a literary work based on an analysis of its content. Of course, for the essay itself to be successful, you must now present evidence from the novel that will convince the reader of your interpretation.

Works consulted

We consulted these works while writing this handout. This is not a comprehensive list of resources on the handout’s topic, and we encourage you to do your own research to find additional publications. Please do not use this list as a model for the format of your own reference list, as it may not match the citation style you are using. For guidance on formatting citations, please see the UNC Libraries citation tutorial . We revise these tips periodically and welcome feedback.

Anson, Chris M., and Robert A. Schwegler. 2010. The Longman Handbook for Writers and Readers , 6th ed. New York: Longman.

Lunsford, Andrea A. 2015. The St. Martin’s Handbook , 8th ed. Boston: Bedford/St Martin’s.

Ramage, John D., John C. Bean, and June Johnson. 2018. The Allyn & Bacon Guide to Writing , 8th ed. New York: Pearson.

Ruszkiewicz, John J., Christy Friend, Daniel Seward, and Maxine Hairston. 2010. The Scott, Foresman Handbook for Writers , 9th ed. Boston: Pearson Education.

You may reproduce it for non-commercial use if you use the entire handout and attribute the source: The Writing Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Make a Gift

  • Write my thesis
  • Thesis writers
  • Buy thesis papers
  • Bachelor thesis
  • Master's thesis
  • Thesis editing services
  • Thesis proofreading services
  • Buy a thesis online
  • Write my dissertation
  • Dissertation proposal help
  • Pay for dissertation
  • Custom dissertation
  • Dissertation help online
  • Buy dissertation online
  • Cheap dissertation
  • Dissertation editing services
  • Write my research paper
  • Buy research paper online
  • Pay for research paper
  • Research paper help
  • Order research paper
  • Custom research paper
  • Cheap research paper
  • Research papers for sale
  • Thesis subjects
  • How It Works

80+ Great Research Titles Examples in Various Academic Fields

Research titles examples

Coming up with a research title for an academic paper is one of the most challenging parts of the writing process. Even though there is an unlimited quantity of research titles to write about, knowing which one is best for you can be hard. We have done the research for you and compiled eighty examples of research titles to write on. Additionally, we have divided the research titles examples into sections to make them easier to choose.

Research Study Examples of Current Events

Examples of research topics on ethics, title of research study examples on health, research paper title examples on social concerns, examples of research title on art and culture, example of research interest in religion, samples of research study topics on technology, research examples of environmental studies, good research title examples on history, specific topic examples regarding education, research title examples for students on family, food, and nutrition, research problems examples computer science, samples of research title about business marketing and communications, sample of research study topics in women’s studies, research problem example on politics, what are some examples of research paper topics on law, final words about research titles.

When it comes to choosing a good sample research title, research is one of the best tips you can get. By reading widely, including your school notes and scholarly articles, you will have a problem/line of interest examples in research. Then, you can derive any question from areas that appear to have a knowledge gap and proceed with researching the answer. As promised, below are eighty research title examples categorized into different areas, including social media research topics .

  • Discuss the peculiar policies of a named country – for example, discuss the impacts of the one-child policy of China.
  • Research on the influence of a named political leader, say a president, on the country they governed and other countries around. For instance, you can talk about how Trump’s presidency has changed international relations.
  • Conduct an analysis of a particular aspect of two named countries – for example, the history of the relationship between the U.S. and North Korea.
  • Compare the immigration laws in two or more named countries – for example, discuss how the immigration laws in the U.S. compares with other countries.
  • Discuss how the Black Lives Matter movement has affected the view and discussions about racism in the United States.
  • Enumerate the different ways the government of the United States can reduce deaths arising from the unregulated use of guns.
  • Analyze the place of ethics in medicine or of medical practitioners. For instance, you can discuss the prevalence of physician-assisted suicides in a named country. You may also talk about the ethicality of such a practice and whether it should be legal.
  • Explain how recent research breakthroughs have affected that particular field – for instance, how stem cell research has impacted the medical field.
  • Explain if and why people should be able to donate organs in exchange for money.
  • Discuss ethical behaviors in the workplace and (or) the educational sector. For example, talk about whether or not affirmative action is still important or necessary in education or the workplace.
  • Weigh the benefits and risks of vaccinating children and decide which one outweighs the other. Here, you might want to consider the different types of vaccinations and the nature and frequency of associated complications.
  • Investigate at least one of the health issues that currently pose a threat to humanity and which are under investigation. These issues can include Alzheimer’s, cancer, depression, autism, and HIV/AIDS. Research how these issues affect individuals and society and recommend solutions to alleviate cost and suffering.
  • Study some individuals suffering from and under treatment for depression. Then, investigate the common predictors of the disease and how this information can help prevent the issue.

Tip : To make this example of a research title more comprehensive, you can focus on a certain age range – say, teenagers.

  • Discuss whether or not free healthcare and medication should be available to people and the likely implications.
  • Identify and elucidate different methods or programs that have been most effective in preventing or reducing teen pregnancy.
  • Analyze different reasons and circumstances for genetic manipulation and the different perspectives of people on this matter. Then, discuss whether or not parents should be allowed to engineer designer babies.
  • Identify the types of immigration benefits, including financial, medical, and education, your country provides for refugees and immigrants. Then, discuss how these benefits have helped them in settling down and whether more or less should be provided.
  • Discuss the acceptance rate of the gay community in your country or a specific community. For example, consider whether or not gay marriage is permitted if they can adopt children, and if they are welcome in religious gatherings.
  • Explore and discuss if terrorism truly creates a fear culture that can become a society’s unintended terrorist.
  • Consider and discuss the different techniques one can use to identify pedophiles on social media.

Tip : Social issues research topics are interesting, but ensure you write formally and professionally.

  • Investigate the importance or lack of importance of art in primary or secondary education. You can also recommend whether or not it should be included in the curriculum and why.

Tip : You can write on this possible research title based on your experiences, whether positive or negative.

  • Discuss the role of illustration in children’s books and how it facilitates easy understanding in children. You may focus on one particular book or select a few examples and compare and contrast.
  • Should the use of art in books for adults be considered, and what are the likely benefits?
  • Compare and contrast the differences in art from two named cultural Renaissance – for instance, the Northern Renaissance and the Italian Renaissance.
  • Investigate how sexism is portrayed in different types of media, including video games, music, and film. You can also talk about whether or not the amount of sexism portrayed has reduced or increased over the years.
  • Explore different perspectives and views on dreams; are they meaningful or simply a game of the sleeping mind? You can also discuss the functions and causes of dreams, like sleeping with anxiety, eating before bed, and prophecies.
  • Investigate the main reasons why religious cults are powerful and appealing to the masses, referring to individual cases.
  • Investigate the impact of religion on the crime rate in a particular region.

Tip : Narrow down this research title by choosing to focus on a particular age group, say children or teenagers, or family. Alternatively, you can focus on a particular crime in the research to make the paper more extensive.

  • Explore reasons why Martin Luther decided to split with the Catholic church.
  • Discuss the circumstances in Siddhartha’s life that led to him becoming the Buddha.

Tip : It is important to remove sentiments from your research and base your points instead on clear evidence from a sound study. This ensures your title of research does not lead to unsubstantiated value judgments, which reduces the quality of the paper.

  • Discuss how the steel sword, gunpowder, biological warfare, longbow, or atomic bomb has changed the nature of warfare.

Tip : For this example of the research problem, choose only one of these technological developments or compare two or more to have a rich research paper.

  • Explore the changes computers, tablets, and smartphones have brought to human behaviors and culture, using published information and personal experience.

Tip : Approach each research study example in a research paper context or buy research paper online , giving a formal but objective view of the subject.

  • Are railroads and trains primary forces in the industrialization, exploitation, and settlement of your homeland or continent?
  • Discuss how the use of fossil fuels has changed or shaped the world.

Tip : Narrow down this title of the research study to focus on a local or particular area or one effect of fossil fuels, like oil spill pollution.

  • Discuss what progress countries have made with artificial intelligence. You can focus on one named country or compare the progress of one country with another.
  • Investigate the factual status of global warming – that is, is it a reality or a hoax? If it is a reality, explore the primary causes and how humanity can make a difference.
  • Conduct in-depth research on endangered wildlife species in your community and discuss why they have become endangered. You can also enumerate what steps the community can take to prevent these species from going extinct and increase their chances of survival.
  • Investigate the environmental soundness of the power sources in your country or community. Then, recommend alternative energy sources that might be best suited for the area and why.
  • Consider an area close to wildlife reserves and national parks, and see whether oil and mineral exploration has occurred there. Discuss whether this action should be allowed or not, with fact-backed reasons.
  • Investigate how the use and abolishment of DDT have affected the population of birds in your country.

Tip : Each example research title requires that you consult authoritative scientific reports to improve the quality of your paper. Furthermore, specificity and preciseness are required in each example of research title and problem, which only an authority source can provide.

  • Discuss the importance of a major historical event and why it was so important in the day. These events can include the assassination of John F. Kennedy or some revolutionary document like the Magna Carta.
  • Consider voyagers such as the Vikings, Chinese, as well as native populations and investigate whether Columbus discovered America first.
  • Choose a named historical group, family, or individual through their biographies, examining them for reader responses.
  • Research people of different cultural orientations and their responses to the acts of others who live around them.
  • Investigate natural disasters in a named country and how the government has responded to them. For example, explore how the response of the New Orleans government to natural disasters has changed since Hurricane Katrina.

Tip : Focus this research title sample on one particular country or natural disaster or compare the responses of two countries with each other.

  • Explore the educational policy, “no child left behind,” investigating its benefits and drawbacks.
  • Investigate the concept of plagiarism in the twenty-first century, its consequences, and its prevalence in modern universities. Take a step further to investigate how and why many students don’t understand the gravity of their errors.
  • Do in-depth research on bullying in schools, explaining the seriousness of the problem in your area in particular. Also, recommend actions schools, teachers, and parents can take to improve the situation if anything.
  • Explore the place of religion in public schools; if it has a place, explain why, and if it does not, explain why not.
  • Does a student’s financial background have any effect on his or her academic performance? In this sample research title, you can compare students from different financial backgrounds, from wealthy to average, and their scores on standardized tests.
  • Is spanking one’s child considered child abuse; if so, why? In this research problem example for students, consider whether or not parents should be able to spank their children.
  • Investigate the relationship between family health and nutrition, focusing on particular nutrition. This example of the title of the research study, for instance, can focus on the relationship between breastfeeding and baby health.
  • Elucidate on, if any, the benefits of having a home-cooked meal and sitting down as a family to eat together.
  • Explore the effect of fast-food restaurants on family health and nutrition, and whether or not they should be regulated.
  • Research local food producers and farms in your community, pinpointing how much of your diet is acquired from them.

Tip : These are great research titles from which you can coin research topics for STEM students .

  • Compare and contrast the two major operating systems: Mac and Windows, and discuss which one is better.

Tip : This title of the research study example can lead to strong uninformed opinions on the matter. However, it is important to investigate and discuss facts about the two operating systems, basing your conclusions on these.

  • Explain the effect of spell checkers, autocorrect functions, and grammar checkers on the writing skills of computer users. Have these tools improved users’ writing skills or weakened them?

Tip : For this example of title research, it is better to consider more than one of these tools to write a comprehensive paper.

  • Discuss the role(s) artificial intelligence is playing now or will likely play in the future as regards human evolution.
  • Identify and investigate the next groundbreaking development in computer science (like the metaverse), explaining why you believe it will be important.
  • Discuss a particular trendsetting technological tool, like blockchain technology, and how it has benefited different sectors.

Tip : For this research title example, you may want to focus on the effect of one tool on one particular sector. This way, you can investigate this example of research and thesis statement about social media more thoroughly and give as many details as possible.

  • Consider your personal experiences as well as close friends’ and families experiences. Then, determine how marketing has invaded your lives and whether these impersonal communications are more positive than negative or vice versa.
  • Investigate the regulations (or lack thereof) that apply to marketing items to children in your region. Do you think these regulations are unfounded, right, or inadequate?
  • Investigate the merits and demerits of outsourcing customer services; you can compare the views of businesses with those of their customers.
  • How has the communication we do through blog sites, messaging, social media, email, and other online platforms improved interpersonal communications if it has?
  • Can understanding culture change the way you do business? Discuss how.

Tip : Ensure you share your reasoning on this title of the research study example and provide evidence-backed information to support your points.

  • Learn everything you can about eating disorders like bulimia and anorexia, as well as their causes, and symptoms. Then, investigate and discuss the impact of its significance and recommend actions that might improve the situation.
  • Research a major development in women’s history, like the admission of women to higher institutions and the legalization of abortion. Discuss the short-term and (or) long-term implications of the named event or development.
  • Discuss gender inequality in the workplace – for instance, the fact that women tend to earn less than men for doing the same job. Provide specific real-life examples as you explain the reasons for this and recommend solutions to the problem.
  • How have beauty contests helped women: have they empowered them in society or objectified them?

Tip : You may shift the focus of this topic research example to female strippers or women who act in pornographic movies.

  • Investigate exceptional businesswomen in the 21st century; you can focus on one or compare two or more.

Tip : When writing on the title of a research example related to women, avoid using persuasion tactics; instead, be tactful and professional in presenting your points.

  • Discuss the unique nature and implications of Donald Trump’s presidency on the United States and the world.
  • Investigate the conditions and forces related to the advent and rise of Nazi Germany. Shift the focus of this title research example on major wars like WWI or the American Civil War.
  • Is the enormous amount of money spent during election campaigns a legitimate expense?
  • Investigate a named major political scandal that recently occurred in your region or country. Discuss how it started, how its news spread, and its impacts on individuals in that area.
  • Discuss the impacts British rule had on India.
  • Investigate the rate of incarceration in your region and compare it with that of other countries or other regions.
  • Is incarcerating criminals an effective solution in promoting the rehabilitation of criminals and controlling crime rates?
  • Consider various perspectives on the issue of gun control and coin several argumentative essay topics on the matter.
  • Why do drivers continue to text while driving despite legal implications and dire consequences?
  • Discuss the legality of people taking their own lives due to suffering from a debilitating terminal disease.

Each example of the research title provided in this article will make for a rich, information-dense research paper. However, you have a part to play in researching thoroughly on the example of the research study. To simplify the entire process for you, hiring our writing services is key as you wouldn’t have to worry about choosing topics. Our team of skilled writers knows the right subject that suits your research and how to readily get materials on them.

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

  • Privacy Policy

Research Method

Home » Thesis Format – Templates and Samples

Thesis Format – Templates and Samples

Table of contents.

Thesis Format

Thesis Format

Thesis format refers to the structure and layout of a research thesis or dissertation. It typically includes several chapters, each of which focuses on a particular aspect of the research topic .

The exact format of a thesis can vary depending on the academic discipline and the institution, but some common elements include:

Introduction

Literature review, methodology.

The title page is the first page of a thesis that provides essential information about the document, such as the title, author’s name, degree program, university, and the date of submission. It is considered as an important component of a thesis as it gives the reader an initial impression of the document’s content and quality.

The typical contents of a title page in a thesis include:

  • The title of the thesis: It should be concise, informative, and accurately represent the main topic of the research.
  • Author’s name: This should be written in full and should be the same as it appears on official university records.
  • Degree program and department: This should specify the type of degree (e.g., Bachelor’s, Master’s, or Doctoral) and the field of study (e.g., Computer Science, Psychology, etc.).
  • University: The name of the university where the thesis is being submitted.
  • Date of submission : The month and year of submission of the thesis.
  • Other details that can be included on the title page include the name of the advisor, the name of the committee members, and any acknowledgments.

In terms of formatting, the title page should be centered horizontally and vertically on the page, with a consistent font size and style. The page margin for the title page should be at least 1 inch (2.54 cm) on all sides. Additionally, it is common practice to include the university logo or crest on the title page, and this should be placed appropriately.

Title of the Thesis in Title Case by Author’s Full Name in Title Case

A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Department Name at the University Name

Month Year of Submission

An abstract is a brief summary of a thesis or research paper that provides an overview of the main points, methodology, and findings of the study. It is typically placed at the beginning of the document, after the title page and before the introduction.

The purpose of an abstract is to provide readers with a quick and concise overview of the research paper or thesis. It should be written in a clear and concise language, and should not contain any jargon or technical terms that are not easily understood by the general public.

Here’s an example of an abstract for a thesis:

Title: The Impact of Social Media on Mental Health among Adolescents

This study examines the impact of social media on mental health among adolescents. The research utilized a survey methodology and collected data from a sample of 500 adolescents aged between 13 and 18 years. The findings reveal that social media has a significant impact on mental health among adolescents, with frequent use of social media associated with higher levels of anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem. The study concludes that there is a need for increased awareness and education on the risks associated with excessive use of social media, and recommends strategies for promoting healthy social media habits among adolescents.

In this example, the abstract provides a concise summary of the thesis by highlighting the main points, methodology, and findings of the study. It also provides a clear indication of the significance of the study and its implications for future research and practice.

A table of contents is an essential part of a thesis as it provides the reader with an overview of the entire document’s structure and organization.

Here’s an example of how a table of contents might look in a thesis:

TABLE OF CONTENTS

I. INTRODUCTION ……………………………………………………..1

A. Background of the Study………………………………………..1

B. Statement of the Problem……………………………………….2

C. Objectives of the Study………………………………………..3

D. Research Questions…………………………………………….4

E. Significance of the Study………………………………………5

F. Scope and Limitations………………………………………….6

G. Definition of Terms……………………………………………7

II. LITERATURE REVIEW. ………………………………………………8

A. Overview of the Literature……………………………………..8

B. Key Themes and Concepts………………………………………..9

C. Gaps in the Literature………………………………………..10

D. Theoretical Framework………………………………………….11

III. METHODOLOGY ……………………………………………………12

A. Research Design………………………………………………12

B. Participants and Sampling……………………………………..13

C. Data Collection Procedures…………………………………….14

D. Data Analysis Procedures………………………………………15

IV. RESULTS …………………………………………………………16

A. Descriptive Statistics…………………………………………16

B. Inferential Statistics…………………………………………17

V. DISCUSSION ………………………………………………………18

A. Interpretation of Results………………………………………18

B. Discussion of Finding s …………………………………………19

C. Implications of the Study………………………………………20

VI. CONCLUSION ………………………………………………………21

A. Summary of the Study…………………………………………..21

B. Limitations of the Study……………………………………….22

C. Recommendations for Future Research……………………………..23

REFERENCES …………………………………………………………….24

APPENDICES …………………………………………………………….26

As you can see, the table of contents is organized by chapters and sections. Each chapter and section is listed with its corresponding page number, making it easy for the reader to navigate the thesis.

The introduction is a critical part of a thesis as it provides an overview of the research problem, sets the context for the study, and outlines the research objectives and questions. The introduction is typically the first chapter of a thesis and serves as a roadmap for the reader.

Here’s an example of how an introduction in a thesis might look:

Introduction:

The prevalence of obesity has increased rapidly in recent decades, with more than one-third of adults in the United States being classified as obese. Obesity is associated with numerous adverse health outcomes, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and certain cancers. Despite significant efforts to address this issue, the rates of obesity continue to rise. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between lifestyle behaviors and obesity in young adults.

The study will be conducted using a mixed-methods approach, with both qualitative and quantitative data collection methods. The research objectives are to:

  • Examine the relationship between lifestyle behaviors and obesity in young adults.
  • Identify the key lifestyle factors that contribute to obesity in young adults.
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of current interventions aimed at preventing and reducing obesity in young adults.

The research questions that will guide this study are:

  • What is the relationship between lifestyle behaviors and obesity in young adults?
  • Which lifestyle factors are most strongly associated with obesity in young adults?
  • How effective are current interventions aimed at preventing and reducing obesity in young adults?

By addressing these research questions, this study aims to contribute to the understanding of the factors that contribute to obesity in young adults and to inform the development of effective interventions to prevent and reduce obesity in this population.

A literature review is a critical analysis and evaluation of existing literature on a specific topic or research question. It is an essential part of any thesis, as it provides a comprehensive overview of the existing research on the topic and helps to establish the theoretical framework for the study. The literature review allows the researcher to identify gaps in the current research, highlight areas that need further exploration, and demonstrate the importance of their research question.

April 9, 2023:

A search on Google Scholar for “Effectiveness of Online Learning during the COVID-19 Pandemic” yielded 1,540 results. Upon reviewing the first few pages of results, it is evident that there is a significant amount of literature on the topic. A majority of the studies focus on the experiences and perspectives of students and educators during the transition to online learning due to the pandemic.

One recent study published in the Journal of Educational Technology & Society (Liu et al., 2023) found that students who were already familiar with online learning tools and platforms had an easier time adapting to online learning than those who were not. However, the study also found that students who were not familiar with online learning tools were able to adapt with proper support from their teachers and institutions.

Another study published in Computers & Education (Tang et al., 2023) compared the academic performance of students in online and traditional classroom settings during the pandemic. The study found that while there were no significant differences in the grades of students in the two settings, students in online classes reported higher levels of stress and lower levels of satisfaction with their learning experience.

Methodology in a thesis refers to the overall approach and systematic process that a researcher follows to collect and analyze data in order to answer their research question(s) or achieve their research objectives. It includes the research design, data collection methods, sampling techniques, data analysis procedures, and any other relevant procedures that the researcher uses to conduct their research.

For example, let’s consider a thesis on the impact of social media on mental health among teenagers. The methodology for this thesis might involve the following steps:

Research Design:

The researcher may choose to conduct a quantitative study using a survey questionnaire to collect data on social media usage and mental health among teenagers. Alternatively, they may conduct a qualitative study using focus group discussions or interviews to gain a deeper understanding of the experiences and perspectives of teenagers regarding social media and mental health.

Sampling Techniques:

The researcher may use random sampling to select a representative sample of teenagers from a specific geographic location or demographic group, or they may use purposive sampling to select participants who meet specific criteria such as age, gender, or mental health status.

Data Collection Methods:

The researcher may use an online survey tool to collect data on social media usage and mental health, or they may conduct face-to-face interviews or focus group discussions to gather qualitative data. They may also use existing data sources such as medical records or social media posts.

Data Analysis Procedures:

The researcher may use statistical analysis techniques such as regression analysis to examine the relationship between social media usage and mental health, or they may use thematic analysis to identify key themes and patterns in the qualitative data.

Ethical Considerations: The researcher must ensure that their research is conducted in an ethical manner, which may involve obtaining informed consent from participants, protecting their confidentiality, and ensuring that their rights and welfare are respected.

In a thesis, the “Results” section typically presents the findings of the research conducted by the author. This section typically includes both quantitative and qualitative data, such as statistical analyses, tables, figures, and other relevant data.

Here are some examples of how the “Results” section of a thesis might look:

Example 1: A quantitative study on the effects of exercise on cardiovascular health

In this study, the author conducts a randomized controlled trial to investigate the effects of exercise on cardiovascular health in a group of sedentary adults. The “Results” section might include tables showing the changes in blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and other relevant indicators in the exercise and control groups over the course of the study. The section might also include statistical analyses, such as t-tests or ANOVA, to demonstrate the significance of the results.

Example 2: A qualitative study on the experiences of immigrant families in a new country

In this study, the author conducts in-depth interviews with immigrant families to explore their experiences of adapting to a new country. The “Results” section might include quotes from the interviews that illustrate the participants’ experiences, as well as a thematic analysis that identifies common themes and patterns in the data. The section might also include a discussion of the implications of the findings for policy and practice.

A thesis discussion section is an opportunity for the author to present their interpretation and analysis of the research results. In this section, the author can provide their opinion on the findings, compare them with other literature, and suggest future research directions.

For example, let’s say the thesis topic is about the impact of social media on mental health. The author has conducted a survey among 500 individuals and has found that there is a significant correlation between excessive social media use and poor mental health.

In the discussion section, the author can start by summarizing the main findings and stating their interpretation of the results. For instance, the author may argue that excessive social media use is likely to cause mental health problems due to the pressure of constantly comparing oneself to others, fear of missing out, and cyberbullying.

Next, the author can compare their results with other studies and point out similarities and differences. They can also identify any limitations in their research design and suggest future directions for research.

For example, the author may point out that their study only measured social media use and mental health at one point in time, and it is unclear whether one caused the other or whether there are other confounding factors. Therefore, they may suggest longitudinal studies that follow individuals over time to better understand the causal relationship.

Writing a conclusion for a thesis is an essential part of the overall writing process. The conclusion should summarize the main points of the thesis and provide a sense of closure to the reader. It is also an opportunity to reflect on the research process and offer suggestions for further study.

Here is an example of a conclusion for a thesis:

After an extensive analysis of the data collected, it is evident that the implementation of a new curriculum has had a significant impact on student achievement. The findings suggest that the new curriculum has improved student performance in all subject areas, and this improvement is particularly notable in math and science. The results of this study provide empirical evidence to support the notion that curriculum reform can positively impact student learning outcomes.

In addition to the positive results, this study has also identified areas for future research. One limitation of the current study is that it only examines the short-term effects of the new curriculum. Future studies should explore the long-term effects of the new curriculum on student performance, as well as investigate the impact of the curriculum on students with different learning styles and abilities.

Overall, the findings of this study have important implications for educators and policymakers who are interested in improving student outcomes. The results of this study suggest that the implementation of a new curriculum can have a positive impact on student achievement, and it is recommended that schools and districts consider curriculum reform as a means of improving student learning outcomes.

References in a thesis typically follow a specific format depending on the citation style required by your academic institution or publisher.

Below are some examples of different citation styles and how to reference different types of sources in your thesis:

In-text citation format: (Author, Year)

Reference list format for a book: Author, A. A. (Year of publication). Title of work: Capital letter also for subtitle. Publisher.

Example: In-text citation: (Smith, 2010) Reference list entry: Smith, J. D. (2010). The art of writing a thesis. Cambridge University Press.

Reference list format for a journal article: Author, A. A., Author, B. B., & Author, C. C. (Year of publication). Title of article. Title of Journal, volume number(issue number), page range.

Example: In-text citation: (Brown, 2015) Reference list entry: Brown, E., Smith, J., & Johnson, L. (2015). The impact of social media on academic performance. Journal of Educational Psychology, 108(3), 393-407.

In-text citation format: (Author page number)

Works Cited list format for a book: Author. Title of Book. Publisher, Year of publication.

Example: In-text citation: (Smith 75) Works Cited entry: Smith, John D. The Art of Writing a Thesis. Cambridge University Press, 2010.

Works Cited list format for a journal article: Author(s). “Title of Article.” Title of Journal, volume number, issue number, date, pages.

Example: In-text citation: (Brown 394) Works Cited entry: Brown, Elizabeth, et al. “The Impact of Social Media on Academic Performance.” Journal of Educational Psychology, vol. 108, no. 3, 2015, pp. 393-407.

Chicago Style

In-text citation format: (Author year, page number)

Bibliography list format for a book: Author. Title of Book. Place of publication: Publisher, Year of publication.

Example: In-text citation: (Smith 2010, 75) Bibliography entry: Smith, John D. The Art of Writing a Thesis. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010.

Bibliography list format for a journal article: Author. “Title of Article.” Title of Journal volume number, no. issue number (date): page numbers.

Example: In-text citation: (Brown 2015, 394) Bibliography entry: Brown, Elizabeth, John Smith, and Laura Johnson. “The Impact of Social Media on Academic Performance.” Journal of Educational Psychology 108, no. 3 (2015): 393-407.

Reference list format for a book: [1] A. A. Author, Title of Book. City of Publisher, Abbrev. of State: Publisher, year.

Example: In-text citation: [1] Reference list entry: A. J. Smith, The Art of Writing a Thesis. New York, NY: Academic Press, 2010.

Reference list format for a journal article: [1] A. A. Author, “Title of Article,” Title of Journal, vol. x, no. x, pp. xxx-xxx, Month year.

Example: In-text citation: [1] Reference list entry: E. Brown, J. D. Smith, and L. Johnson, “The Impact of Social Media on Academic Performance,” Journal of Educational Psychology, vol. 108, no. 3, pp. 393-407, Mar. 2015.

An appendix in a thesis is a section that contains additional information that is not included in the main body of the document but is still relevant to the topic being discussed. It can include figures, tables, graphs, data sets, sample questionnaires, or any other supplementary material that supports your thesis.

Here is an example of how you can format appendices in your thesis:

  • Title page: The appendix should have a separate title page that lists the title, author’s name, the date, and the document type (i.e., thesis or dissertation). The title page should be numbered as the first page of the appendix section.
  • Table of contents: If you have more than one appendix, you should include a separate table of contents that lists each appendix and its page number. The table of contents should come after the title page.
  • Appendix sections: Each appendix should have its own section with a clear and concise title that describes the contents of the appendix. Each section should be numbered with Arabic numerals (e.g., Appendix 1, Appendix 2, etc.). The sections should be listed in the table of contents.
  • Formatting: The formatting of the appendices should be consistent with the rest of the thesis. This includes font size, font style, line spacing, and margins.
  • Example: Here is an example of what an appendix might look like in a thesis on the topic of climate change:

Appendix 1: Data Sources

This appendix includes a list of the primary data sources used in this thesis, including their URLs and a brief description of the data they provide.

Appendix 2: Survey Questionnaire

This appendix includes the survey questionnaire used to collect data from participants in the study.

Appendix 3: Additional Figures

This appendix includes additional figures that were not included in the main body of the thesis due to space limitations. These figures provide additional support for the findings presented in the thesis.

About the author

' src=

Muhammad Hassan

Researcher, Academic Writer, Web developer

You may also like

Dissertation Methodology

Dissertation Methodology – Structure, Example...

Dissertation

Dissertation – Format, Example and Template

Thesis Outline

Thesis Outline – Example, Template and Writing...

Scope of the Research

Scope of the Research – Writing Guide and...

Implications in Research

Implications in Research – Types, Examples and...

APA Table of Contents

APA Table of Contents – Format and Example

Home » Classmates

131 Best Research Group/Team Names (Curated & Ranked) + Generator

' src=

Research is a massive and wide-ranging field, with areas of study ranging between science, creative arts, society, economics, technology, engineering, and more. https://www.griffith.edu.au/research/research-services/research-policy-performance/era/field-of-research-codes ' data-toggle="tooltip" data-html="true">[1]

There are also many types of research, including theoretical, applied, exploratory, descriptive, and correlational. https://www.discoverphds.com/blog/types-of-research ' data-toggle="tooltip" data-html="true">[2]

Research groups tend to spend long hours in labs, in libraries, or behind computers, diligently conducting their studies.

Coming up with an excellent name for your research team can foster a sense of community that will get you through even the most frustrating phases of your project.

Your group name can be as bright and creative as you please. After all, who says academia has to be dull?

See our list of research group name ideas below or scroll past the list for our name generator and tips on creating unique ideas of your own.

Research Group/Team Names

The Research Subculture

Theory Builders & Testers

Statistically Significant Squad

Selected at Random

Variable Characteristics Unit

Mapping the Mental Model

good for psychological research teams

Aiming for Specifics

The Acculturation Network

adaptive cultures

Expediting the Review

Arbitrary Zero Points

Pluralistic Approach Trends

Just a Minimal Risk

Digging For Truth

good for an archaeological research team

Significant Hypothesis Effects

One Way or ANOVA

reference to the analysis of variance

Team Treatments & Cures

The T-Test Troop

population test

Triangulation Trends

Research Is a Step

Presenting an Answer

Narrowing the Scope

Choices Increased

Ecological Fallacies

Our Emic Perspectives

good for cultural research groups

Estimated Parameters

The Maxima Matrix

greater points

Justified Conclusions Crew

Estimating Future Trends

Error Frequency Analyzers

Alpha Level Variables

Oh, For Knowledge's Sake!

The Branch of Knowledge

Representative Sample Standards

Normal Curve Conformers

Inclusion Criteria Determined

In the Control Group

Pilot Study Preliminaries

Checking the Validity

Never Repetitive or Redundant

Random Chance Phenomenons

In Naturalistic Settings

Ratios at Odds

Research Paradigms

Multi-Faceted Data Set

Meeting the Criteria

The Aggregate Group

reference to total data

Readers, Interpreters, & Evaluators

Anonymity Collective

The Experimental Club

Predetermined Significance Levels

Distance Between Scores

Measure of Variations

Sociolinguistics Network

good for language research teams

Following Linguistic Cues

Sampling Reliability Errors

Experimental Study Participants

Debriefing Participants

The Null Hypothesis

Trustworthy Results Indicators

Describe, Organize, and Summarize

Abstract and Concept-Oriented

The Hypothesis Network

Clarity of Purpose

Specific Objectives Squad

Manipulated Variables

Subjects Selected Randomly

General Inferential Statistics

Limitations of Study

Timeline for Completion

The Nonparametric Crew

Intervals and Ratios

Stating the Problems

Parametric Data People

Phenomenological Perspectives

participant’s point of view

Research Variables Grid

Exclusion Criteria Group

Irrelevant Influences

Eliminating Interference

Trent Analysis Troop

Case Study Collective

Indistinguishable Placebos

Epidemiology Study Squad

good for a medical/disease research group

Minesweepers Anonymous

False Conclusions Group

Negative Side Effects

Cause and Effect Factors

The Fishbone Force

reference to the “fishbone” visual analysis tool

Simple Gestalt Principles

reference to concepts of perception

Mental Model Users

Objective Axioms

Written Anecdotal Records

On the Audit Trail

Random Survey Sub-Samplers

Chaos Theory Methodology

Unexplained Error Terms

Path Analysis, Peer Reviews

The Etic View Outsiders

Synchronically Reliable

Two-Tailed Test Team

R-Squared Outcomes

The Sample Relics

Significant P-Values

Pie Chart Participants

Quota Sampling Processors

Devising New Applications

Cultural Insiders Crew

The Common Endpoints

What Remains Unexplained

Looking for Existence

Expectancy Effect Cues

Reaching the Floor

the lowest limit

The Flowchart Frequency

Foreshadowing Problems

The Gain Score Group

pre-and post-test difference

Gini Coefficient Genies

P-Value Chances

results due to chance

The Histogram Network

rectangle graph

Life Histories, Research Stories

Post-Test Only Group

Creating New Knowledge

The Uncorrelated Grid

Chi-Square Testers

statistics tests

Average Absolute Values

Multivariate Analysis Matrix

more than one

Point Estimate Statistics

single characteristics

Delimitation Descriptions

narrow scope

Characteristics Can Vary

Dichotomous Variable Cohorts

two categories

Reliability Inter-Raters

consistency measure

Jackknifed Parameters

population estimates

Two Ways or ANOVA

two variables

Research Group Name Generator

How to create a good research group name.

When creating a research group name, it’s easiest to take inspiration from one of two places: your field of research, or the research process itself.

We used these techniques when creating our list. These are two things that you know well, so you should have no shortage of options or inspiration — and you’ll end up with a more unique name than “[Last name] Research Group” or “[Topic] Research Group.”

You might want to start by creating a list of terms that you find interesting or cool — perhaps even your favorite parts of the research process.

You don’t need to use these words verbatim; just write them down and see if any ideas come to mind that sound as though they could work for a group name.

Research group names can serve a couple of different purposes; they can help shape the vision of your group, encourage teamwork, and provide a sense of identity for the researchers in your group.

Once you have a handful of options, keep these goals in mind while choosing from your list of potential names.

  • https://www.griffith.edu.au/research/research-services/research-policy-performance/era/field-of-research-codes [ ↩ ]
  • https://www.discoverphds.com/blog/types-of-research [ ↩ ]
  • Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)

Posts you may want to read next...

Data analytics tools shown on a laptop screen

81 Best Data Team Names (Curated & Ranked) + Generator

Science team in a laboratory

63 Best Science Team Names (Curated & Ranked) + Generator

Innovation team at a corporate office

79 Best Innovation Team Names (Curated & Ranked) + Generator

Open notebook with written math practice inside

103 Best Math Team Names and Group Chat Names (Curated & Ranked) + Generator

Leave a reply cancel reply.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Actually Good Team Names' Logo

  • Editorial Policy
  • Join Our Team

Popular posts

Two men playing a video game

69 Best Three-Letter Clan Names (Curated & Ranked) + Generator

Mom and daughter playing at park

Top 123 Funny Mom Group Names & Team Names for Moms (Curated & Ranked) + Generator

Group of eight friends

67 Best Names for Eight-Member Friend Groups (Curated & Ranked) + Generator

Seven-member group

57 Best Names for Seven-Member Friend Groups or Teams (Curated & Ranked) + Generator

Senior citizen group meeting at a coffee shop

193 Best Names for Senior Citizen Groups (Curated & Ranked) + Generator

thesis related names

171 Best Indian Dance Group Names (Curated & Ranked) + Generator

Grad Coach

Research Topics & Ideas: Finance

120+ Finance Research Topic Ideas To Fast-Track Your Project

If you’re just starting out exploring potential research topics for your finance-related dissertation, thesis or research project, you’ve come to the right place. In this post, we’ll help kickstart your research topic ideation process by providing a hearty list of finance-centric research topics and ideas.

PS – This is just the start…

We know it’s exciting to run through a list of research topics, but please keep in mind that this list is just a starting point . To develop a suitable education-related research topic, you’ll need to identify a clear and convincing research gap , and a viable plan of action to fill that gap.

If this sounds foreign to you, check out our free research topic webinar that explores how to find and refine a high-quality research topic, from scratch. Alternatively, if you’d like hands-on help, consider our 1-on-1 coaching service .

Overview: Finance Research Topics

  • Corporate finance topics
  • Investment banking topics
  • Private equity & VC
  • Asset management
  • Hedge funds
  • Financial planning & advisory
  • Quantitative finance
  • Treasury management
  • Financial technology (FinTech)
  • Commercial banking
  • International finance

Research topic idea mega list

Corporate Finance

These research topic ideas explore a breadth of issues ranging from the examination of capital structure to the exploration of financial strategies in mergers and acquisitions.

  • Evaluating the impact of capital structure on firm performance across different industries
  • Assessing the effectiveness of financial management practices in emerging markets
  • A comparative analysis of the cost of capital and financial structure in multinational corporations across different regulatory environments
  • Examining how integrating sustainability and CSR initiatives affect a corporation’s financial performance and brand reputation
  • Analysing how rigorous financial analysis informs strategic decisions and contributes to corporate growth
  • Examining the relationship between corporate governance structures and financial performance
  • A comparative analysis of financing strategies among mergers and acquisitions
  • Evaluating the importance of financial transparency and its impact on investor relations and trust
  • Investigating the role of financial flexibility in strategic investment decisions during economic downturns
  • Investigating how different dividend policies affect shareholder value and the firm’s financial performance

Investment Banking

The list below presents a series of research topics exploring the multifaceted dimensions of investment banking, with a particular focus on its evolution following the 2008 financial crisis.

  • Analysing the evolution and impact of regulatory frameworks in investment banking post-2008 financial crisis
  • Investigating the challenges and opportunities associated with cross-border M&As facilitated by investment banks.
  • Evaluating the role of investment banks in facilitating mergers and acquisitions in emerging markets
  • Analysing the transformation brought about by digital technologies in the delivery of investment banking services and its effects on efficiency and client satisfaction.
  • Evaluating the role of investment banks in promoting sustainable finance and the integration of Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) criteria in investment decisions.
  • Assessing the impact of technology on the efficiency and effectiveness of investment banking services
  • Examining the effectiveness of investment banks in pricing and marketing IPOs, and the subsequent performance of these IPOs in the stock market.
  • A comparative analysis of different risk management strategies employed by investment banks
  • Examining the relationship between investment banking fees and corporate performance
  • A comparative analysis of competitive strategies employed by leading investment banks and their impact on market share and profitability

Private Equity & Venture Capital (VC)

These research topic ideas are centred on venture capital and private equity investments, with a focus on their impact on technological startups, emerging technologies, and broader economic ecosystems.

  • Investigating the determinants of successful venture capital investments in tech startups
  • Analysing the trends and outcomes of venture capital funding in emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence, blockchain, or clean energy
  • Assessing the performance and return on investment of different exit strategies employed by venture capital firms
  • Assessing the impact of private equity investments on the financial performance of SMEs
  • Analysing the role of venture capital in fostering innovation and entrepreneurship
  • Evaluating the exit strategies of private equity firms: A comparative analysis
  • Exploring the ethical considerations in private equity and venture capital financing
  • Investigating how private equity ownership influences operational efficiency and overall business performance
  • Evaluating the effectiveness of corporate governance structures in companies backed by private equity investments
  • Examining how the regulatory environment in different regions affects the operations, investments and performance of private equity and venture capital firms

Research Topic Kickstarter - Need Help Finding A Research Topic?

Asset Management

This list includes a range of research topic ideas focused on asset management, probing into the effectiveness of various strategies, the integration of technology, and the alignment with ethical principles among other key dimensions.

  • Analysing the effectiveness of different asset allocation strategies in diverse economic environments
  • Analysing the methodologies and effectiveness of performance attribution in asset management firms
  • Assessing the impact of environmental, social, and governance (ESG) criteria on fund performance
  • Examining the role of robo-advisors in modern asset management
  • Evaluating how advancements in technology are reshaping portfolio management strategies within asset management firms
  • Evaluating the performance persistence of mutual funds and hedge funds
  • Investigating the long-term performance of portfolios managed with ethical or socially responsible investing principles
  • Investigating the behavioural biases in individual and institutional investment decisions
  • Examining the asset allocation strategies employed by pension funds and their impact on long-term fund performance
  • Assessing the operational efficiency of asset management firms and its correlation with fund performance

Hedge Funds

Here we explore research topics related to hedge fund operations and strategies, including their implications on corporate governance, financial market stability, and regulatory compliance among other critical facets.

  • Assessing the impact of hedge fund activism on corporate governance and financial performance
  • Analysing the effectiveness and implications of market-neutral strategies employed by hedge funds
  • Investigating how different fee structures impact the performance and investor attraction to hedge funds
  • Evaluating the contribution of hedge funds to financial market liquidity and the implications for market stability
  • Analysing the risk-return profile of hedge fund strategies during financial crises
  • Evaluating the influence of regulatory changes on hedge fund operations and performance
  • Examining the level of transparency and disclosure practices in the hedge fund industry and its impact on investor trust and regulatory compliance
  • Assessing the contribution of hedge funds to systemic risk in financial markets, and the effectiveness of regulatory measures in mitigating such risks
  • Examining the role of hedge funds in financial market stability
  • Investigating the determinants of hedge fund success: A comparative analysis

Financial Planning and Advisory

This list explores various research topic ideas related to financial planning, focusing on the effects of financial literacy, the adoption of digital tools, taxation policies, and the role of financial advisors.

  • Evaluating the impact of financial literacy on individual financial planning effectiveness
  • Analysing how different taxation policies influence financial planning strategies among individuals and businesses
  • Evaluating the effectiveness and user adoption of digital tools in modern financial planning practices
  • Investigating the adequacy of long-term financial planning strategies in ensuring retirement security
  • Assessing the role of financial education in shaping financial planning behaviour among different demographic groups
  • Examining the impact of psychological biases on financial planning and decision-making, and strategies to mitigate these biases
  • Assessing the behavioural factors influencing financial planning decisions
  • Examining the role of financial advisors in managing retirement savings
  • A comparative analysis of traditional versus robo-advisory in financial planning
  • Investigating the ethics of financial advisory practices

Free Webinar: How To Find A Dissertation Research Topic

The following list delves into research topics within the insurance sector, touching on the technological transformations, regulatory shifts, and evolving consumer behaviours among other pivotal aspects.

  • Analysing the impact of technology adoption on insurance pricing and risk management
  • Analysing the influence of Insurtech innovations on the competitive dynamics and consumer choices in insurance markets
  • Investigating the factors affecting consumer behaviour in insurance product selection and the role of digital channels in influencing decisions
  • Assessing the effect of regulatory changes on insurance product offerings
  • Examining the determinants of insurance penetration in emerging markets
  • Evaluating the operational efficiency of claims management processes in insurance companies and its impact on customer satisfaction
  • Examining the evolution and effectiveness of risk assessment models used in insurance underwriting and their impact on pricing and coverage
  • Evaluating the role of insurance in financial stability and economic development
  • Investigating the impact of climate change on insurance models and products
  • Exploring the challenges and opportunities in underwriting cyber insurance in the face of evolving cyber threats and regulations

Quantitative Finance

These topic ideas span the development of asset pricing models, evaluation of machine learning algorithms, and the exploration of ethical implications among other pivotal areas.

  • Developing and testing new quantitative models for asset pricing
  • Analysing the effectiveness and limitations of machine learning algorithms in predicting financial market movements
  • Assessing the effectiveness of various risk management techniques in quantitative finance
  • Evaluating the advancements in portfolio optimisation techniques and their impact on risk-adjusted returns
  • Evaluating the impact of high-frequency trading on market efficiency and stability
  • Investigating the influence of algorithmic trading strategies on market efficiency and liquidity
  • Examining the risk parity approach in asset allocation and its effectiveness in different market conditions
  • Examining the application of machine learning and artificial intelligence in quantitative financial analysis
  • Investigating the ethical implications of quantitative financial innovations
  • Assessing the profitability and market impact of statistical arbitrage strategies considering different market microstructures

Treasury Management

The following topic ideas explore treasury management, focusing on modernisation through technological advancements, the impact on firm liquidity, and the intertwined relationship with corporate governance among other crucial areas.

  • Analysing the impact of treasury management practices on firm liquidity and profitability
  • Analysing the role of automation in enhancing operational efficiency and strategic decision-making in treasury management
  • Evaluating the effectiveness of various cash management strategies in multinational corporations
  • Investigating the potential of blockchain technology in streamlining treasury operations and enhancing transparency
  • Examining the role of treasury management in mitigating financial risks
  • Evaluating the accuracy and effectiveness of various cash flow forecasting techniques employed in treasury management
  • Assessing the impact of technological advancements on treasury management operations
  • Examining the effectiveness of different foreign exchange risk management strategies employed by treasury managers in multinational corporations
  • Assessing the impact of regulatory compliance requirements on the operational and strategic aspects of treasury management
  • Investigating the relationship between treasury management and corporate governance

Financial Technology (FinTech)

The following research topic ideas explore the transformative potential of blockchain, the rise of open banking, and the burgeoning landscape of peer-to-peer lending among other focal areas.

  • Evaluating the impact of blockchain technology on financial services
  • Investigating the implications of open banking on consumer data privacy and financial services competition
  • Assessing the role of FinTech in financial inclusion in emerging markets
  • Analysing the role of peer-to-peer lending platforms in promoting financial inclusion and their impact on traditional banking systems
  • Examining the cybersecurity challenges faced by FinTech firms and the regulatory measures to ensure data protection and financial stability
  • Examining the regulatory challenges and opportunities in the FinTech ecosystem
  • Assessing the impact of artificial intelligence on the delivery of financial services, customer experience, and operational efficiency within FinTech firms
  • Analysing the adoption and impact of cryptocurrencies on traditional financial systems
  • Investigating the determinants of success for FinTech startups

Research topic evaluator

Commercial Banking

These topic ideas span commercial banking, encompassing digital transformation, support for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), and the evolving regulatory and competitive landscape among other key themes.

  • Assessing the impact of digital transformation on commercial banking services and competitiveness
  • Analysing the impact of digital transformation on customer experience and operational efficiency in commercial banking
  • Evaluating the role of commercial banks in supporting small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs)
  • Investigating the effectiveness of credit risk management practices and their impact on bank profitability and financial stability
  • Examining the relationship between commercial banking practices and financial stability
  • Evaluating the implications of open banking frameworks on the competitive landscape and service innovation in commercial banking
  • Assessing how regulatory changes affect lending practices and risk appetite of commercial banks
  • Examining how commercial banks are adapting their strategies in response to competition from FinTech firms and changing consumer preferences
  • Analysing the impact of regulatory compliance on commercial banking operations
  • Investigating the determinants of customer satisfaction and loyalty in commercial banking

International Finance

The folowing research topic ideas are centred around international finance and global economic dynamics, delving into aspects like exchange rate fluctuations, international financial regulations, and the role of international financial institutions among other pivotal areas.

  • Analysing the determinants of exchange rate fluctuations and their impact on international trade
  • Analysing the influence of global trade agreements on international financial flows and foreign direct investments
  • Evaluating the effectiveness of international portfolio diversification strategies in mitigating risks and enhancing returns
  • Evaluating the role of international financial institutions in global financial stability
  • Investigating the role and implications of offshore financial centres on international financial stability and regulatory harmonisation
  • Examining the impact of global financial crises on emerging market economies
  • Examining the challenges and regulatory frameworks associated with cross-border banking operations
  • Assessing the effectiveness of international financial regulations
  • Investigating the challenges and opportunities of cross-border mergers and acquisitions

Choosing A Research Topic

These finance-related research topic ideas are starting points to guide your thinking. They are intentionally very broad and open-ended. By engaging with the currently literature in your field of interest, you’ll be able to narrow down your focus to a specific research gap .

When choosing a topic , you’ll need to take into account its originality, relevance, feasibility, and the resources you have at your disposal. Make sure to align your interest and expertise in the subject with your university program’s specific requirements. Always consult your academic advisor to ensure that your chosen topic not only meets the academic criteria but also provides a valuable contribution to the field. 

If you need a helping hand, feel free to check out our private coaching service here.

You Might Also Like:

Topic Kickstarter: Research topics in education

thank you for suggest those topic, I want to ask you about the subjects related to the fintech, can i measure it and how?

Zeleke Getinet Alemayehu

Please guide me on selecting research titles

Submit a Comment Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

  • Print Friendly

Purdue Online Writing Lab Purdue OWL® College of Liberal Arts

Welcome to the Purdue Online Writing Lab

OWL logo

Welcome to the Purdue OWL

This page is brought to you by the OWL at Purdue University. When printing this page, you must include the entire legal notice.

Copyright ©1995-2018 by The Writing Lab & The OWL at Purdue and Purdue University. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, reproduced, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our terms and conditions of fair use.

The Online Writing Lab at Purdue University houses writing resources and instructional material, and we provide these as a free service of the Writing Lab at Purdue. Students, members of the community, and users worldwide will find information to assist with many writing projects. Teachers and trainers may use this material for in-class and out-of-class instruction.

The Purdue On-Campus Writing Lab and Purdue Online Writing Lab assist clients in their development as writers—no matter what their skill level—with on-campus consultations, online participation, and community engagement. The Purdue Writing Lab serves the Purdue, West Lafayette, campus and coordinates with local literacy initiatives. The Purdue OWL offers global support through online reference materials and services.

A Message From the Assistant Director of Content Development 

The Purdue OWL® is committed to supporting  students, instructors, and writers by offering a wide range of resources that are developed and revised with them in mind. To do this, the OWL team is always exploring possibilties for a better design, allowing accessibility and user experience to guide our process. As the OWL undergoes some changes, we welcome your feedback and suggestions by email at any time.

Please don't hesitate to contact us via our contact page  if you have any questions or comments.

All the best,

Social Media

Facebook twitter.

Have a language expert improve your writing

Run a free plagiarism check in 10 minutes, generate accurate citations for free.

  • Knowledge Base
  • Academic writing
  • Capitalization in titles and headings

Capitalization in Titles and Headings

Published on December 22, 2015 by Sarah Vinz . Revised on July 23, 2023.

Instantly correct all language mistakes in your text

Upload your document to correct all your mistakes in minutes

upload-your-document-ai-proofreader

Table of contents

The three heading capitalization styles, capitalize proper nouns (names) no matter what, consistency, consistency, consistency, other interesting articles.

First, you can capitalize every significant word.

Option 1: All significant words capitalized
Chapter 3 Literature Review
Section 3.1 History of Coffee Drinking
Section 3.2 Emerging Coffee Markets in North America
Section 3.2.1 High School and College Students
Section 3.2.2 Commuting Workers
Section 3.3 Competitors in the Hot Beverage Sector

The list of what is considered significant is quite long; it generally includes all nouns , pronouns , adjectives , verbs , and adverbs .

You may find it easier to instead focus on what usually isn’t considered significant (and thus not capitalized, unless it happens to be the first word in a heading):  articles (a, an, the),  prepositions (examples: by, for, in),  conjunctions (examples: and, or, because).

Option 2: Only first words capitalized
Chapter 3 Literature review
Section 3.1 A history of coffee drinking
Section 3.2 Emerging coffee markets in North America
Section 3.2.1 High school and college students
Section 3.2.2 Commuting workers
Section 3.3 Competitors in the hot beverage sector

Finally, the third possibility is to use a combination of the other two options. For instance, you could use option 1 for the chapter headings and option 2 for lower level headings.

Option 3: Capitalization varies by level
Chapter 3 Literature Review
Section 3.1 A history of coffee drinking
Section 3.2 Emerging coffee markets in North America
Section 3.2.1 High school and college students
Section 3.2.2 Commuting workers
Section 3.3 Competitors in the hot beverage sector

Don't submit your assignments before you do this

The academic proofreading tool has been trained on 1000s of academic texts. Making it the most accurate and reliable proofreading tool for students. Free citation check included.

thesis related names

Try for free

Formal names of people, organizations, and places are capitalized no matter what style you use. For instance, North America is capitalized throughout the above examples.

In this regard, note that specific models, theories, and schools of thoughts are not considered proper nouns. The only component that needs to be capitalized is the scholar’s name, when relevant.

Porter’s Five Forces Model Einstein’s Theory of Relativity the Realist school Porter’s five forces model Einstein’s theory of relativity the realist school

Which option should you choose? If you are following the APA style , the rules are clear. Essentially, you should use title case for APA headings level 1 to 5. MLA also has specific requirements for formatting headings .

If you are free to decide, we recommend option 1 or 2. Why? One reason is that it’s easier, you just won’t have to make so many judgment calls about what to capitalize. A second is that using a lot of capital letters may make the text difficult to follow, especially in longer headings.

Whatever option you choose, the most important thing is to use effective headings that are capitalized consistently throughout your entire document. This applies not only to the main chapters of your dissertation, but also to any supporting materials that come before and after (including the abstract, table of contents, lists of tables/figures, acknowledgements, reference list, and appendixes ).

To make sure that no inconsistencies have snuck through, take a very careful look at your table of contents . Seeing all of the headings together will make any anomalies very apparent. This is especially true if you have used Microsoft Word to automatically generate this list.

Also take care that other aspects of your dissertation layout and formatting are consistent in relation to headings.

If you want to know more about AI for academic writing, AI tools, or fallacies make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

  • Ad hominem fallacy
  • Post hoc fallacy
  • Appeal to authority fallacy
  • False cause fallacy
  • Sunk cost fallacy
  • Deep learning
  • Generative AI
  • Machine learning
  • Reinforcement learning
  • Supervised vs. unsupervised learning

 (AI) Tools

  • Grammar Checker
  • Paraphrasing Tool
  • Text Summarizer
  • AI Detector
  • Plagiarism Checker
  • Citation Generator

Cite this Scribbr article

If you want to cite this source, you can copy and paste the citation or click the “Cite this Scribbr article” button to automatically add the citation to our free Citation Generator.

Vinz, S. (2023, July 23). Capitalization in Titles and Headings. Scribbr. Retrieved June 9, 2024, from https://www.scribbr.com/academic-writing/capitalization-titles-headings/

Is this article helpful?

Sarah Vinz

Sarah's academic background includes a Master of Arts in English, a Master of International Affairs degree, and a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science. She loves the challenge of finding the perfect formulation or wording and derives much satisfaction from helping students take their academic writing up a notch.

"I thought AI Proofreading was useless but.."

I've been using Scribbr for years now and I know it's a service that won't disappoint. It does a good job spotting mistakes”

IMAGES

  1. Thesis / Related Forms

    thesis related names

  2. thesis_structure

    thesis related names

  3. 🔥 Thesis statement structure. Thesis and Purpose Statements. 2022-10-17

    thesis related names

  4. A Quick Guide to Thesis Statement Writing

    thesis related names

  5. New

    thesis related names

  6. Samples Of Thesis

    thesis related names

VIDEO

  1. What Is a Thesis?

  2. Ph.D. Chapter two Literature Review for a Thesis| HOW TO WRITE CHAPTE TWO for Ph.D

  3. What Is a master's Thesis (5 Characteristics of an A Plus Thesis)

  4. What is a thesis Statement

  5. Nursery management / E-commerce website

  6. How to download Thesis pdf from Krishikosh

COMMENTS

  1. What is a thesis

    A thesis is an in-depth research study that identifies a particular topic of inquiry and presents a clear argument or perspective about that topic using evidence and logic. Writing a thesis showcases your ability of critical thinking, gathering evidence, and making a compelling argument. Integral to these competencies is thorough research ...

  2. 1000+ Research Topics & Research Title Examples For Students

    1000+ FREE Research Topics & Title Ideas. If you're at the start of your research journey and are trying to figure out which research topic you want to focus on, you've come to the right place. Select your area of interest below to view a comprehensive collection of potential research ideas. AI & Machine Learning. Blockchain & Cryptocurrency.

  3. Thesis Title: Examples and Suggestions from a PhD Grad

    Master's thesis title examples. Creation of an autonomous impulse response measurement system for rooms and transducers with different methods. Guy-Bart Stan, 2000 - Bioengineering - Imperial Professor - direct link to Guy-Bart's bioengineering academic CV. Segmentation of Nerve Bundles and Ganglia in Spine MRI using Particle Filters.

  4. How to Write a Thesis Statement

    Step 2: Write your initial answer. After some initial research, you can formulate a tentative answer to this question. At this stage it can be simple, and it should guide the research process and writing process. The internet has had more of a positive than a negative effect on education.

  5. Thesis Title Generator: Make a Research Title Online

    Developing a thesis title requires time and careful thinking. To create a good one, focus on the main idea you can cover in your work. Decide on the keywords that determine your topic and research them to find the related concepts. They will help you find proper words to formulate your thesis title.

  6. What Is a Thesis?

    Revised on April 16, 2024. A thesis is a type of research paper based on your original research. It is usually submitted as the final step of a master's program or a capstone to a bachelor's degree. Writing a thesis can be a daunting experience. Other than a dissertation, it is one of the longest pieces of writing students typically complete.

  7. Thesis

    Thesis. Your thesis is the central claim in your essay—your main insight or idea about your source or topic. Your thesis should appear early in an academic essay, followed by a logically constructed argument that supports this central claim. A strong thesis is arguable, which means a thoughtful reader could disagree with it and therefore ...

  8. How to Make a Research Paper Title with Examples

    Step 2: Identify research study keywords. Now that you have answers to your research questions, find the most important parts of these responses and make these your study keywords. Note that you should only choose the most important terms for your keywords-journals usually request anywhere from 3 to 8 keywords maximum. One-sentence answer ...

  9. Ultimate Research Title Generator for Your Assignment [Free]

    The outline of a research paper is in some way similar to essay one. You still need a thesis statement, arguments that support it, and your evidence. Nevertheless, there are some major differences too: Introduction. Start with the attention grabber and a thesis sentence. Then, there is additional information that you can provide in this section.

  10. Free Research Name Generator

    In three easy steps, you can create an attention-grabbing name for your research paper in a few minutes with the help of our free online research name generator. Input your search term. Click on the "search topic" button and pick one or more topics proposed by the research name generator. Reload the list by clicking the search button again ...

  11. Thesis & Dissertation Title Page

    The title page (or cover page) of your thesis, dissertation, or research paper should contain all the key information about your document. It usually includes: Dissertation or thesis title. Your name. The type of document (e.g., dissertation, research paper) The department and institution. The degree program (e.g., Master of Arts)

  12. How to Write a Strong Thesis Statement: 4 Steps + Examples

    Step 4: Revise and refine your thesis statement before you start writing. Read through your thesis statement several times before you begin to compose your full essay. You need to make sure the statement is ironclad, since it is the foundation of the entire paper. Edit it or have a peer review it for you to make sure everything makes sense and ...

  13. Research Title Generator: Make a Title for Your Thesis or Paper Easily

    Welcome to our free online research title generator. You can get your title in 3 simple steps: Type your search term and choose one or more subjects from the list, Click on the "Search topic" button and choose among the ideas that the title generator has proposed, Refresh the list by clicking the button one more time if you need more options.

  14. Thesis Statements

    A thesis statement: tells the reader how you will interpret the significance of the subject matter under discussion. is a road map for the paper; in other words, it tells the reader what to expect from the rest of the paper. directly answers the question asked of you. A thesis is an interpretation of a question or subject, not the subject itself.

  15. Sample Thesis Titles

    Completing a thesis is the capstone experience of the QMSS program. Students take this opportunity to apply the tools and methodologies developed through their coursework to questions of particular interest to them. ... First Name . Last Name . LATEST TWEET @QMSS at Columbia 4/4 Gold medalists (1st %ile or >): Kechengjie Zhu, Computer Science ...

  16. 80+ Exceptional Research Titles Examples in Different Areas

    Examples of Research Topics on Ethics. Enumerate the different ways the government of the United States can reduce deaths arising from the unregulated use of guns. Analyze the place of ethics in medicine or of medical practitioners. For instance, you can discuss the prevalence of physician-assisted suicides in a named country.

  17. Thesis Format

    The title page is the first page of a thesis that provides essential information about the document, such as the title, author's name, degree program, university, and the date of submission. It is considered as an important component of a thesis as it gives the reader an initial impression of the document's content and quality.

  18. Dissertation Structure & Layout 101 (+ Examples)

    Time to recap…. And there you have it - the traditional dissertation structure and layout, from A-Z. To recap, the core structure for a dissertation or thesis is (typically) as follows: Title page. Acknowledgments page. Abstract (or executive summary) Table of contents, list of figures and tables.

  19. 131 Best Research Group/Team Names (Curated & Ranked) + Generator

    131 Best Research Group/Team Names (Curated & Ranked) + Generator. Research is a massive and wide-ranging field, with areas of study ranging between science, creative arts, society, economics, technology, engineering, and more. [1] There are also many types of research, including theoretical, applied, exploratory, descriptive, and correlational.

  20. Dissertation & Thesis Outline

    Dissertation & Thesis Outline | Example & Free Templates. Published on June 7, 2022 by Tegan George.Revised on November 21, 2023. A thesis or dissertation outline is one of the most critical early steps in your writing process.It helps you to lay out and organize your ideas and can provide you with a roadmap for deciding the specifics of your dissertation topic and showcasing its relevance to ...

  21. 120+ Research Topics In Finance (+ Free Webinar)

    If you're just starting out exploring potential research topics for your finance-related dissertation, thesis or research project, you've come to the right place. In this post, we'll help kickstart your research topic ideation process by providing a hearty list of finance-centric research topics and ideas. PS - This is just the start…

  22. Welcome to the Purdue Online Writing Lab

    Mission. The Purdue On-Campus Writing Lab and Purdue Online Writing Lab assist clients in their development as writers—no matter what their skill level—with on-campus consultations, online participation, and community engagement. The Purdue Writing Lab serves the Purdue, West Lafayette, campus and coordinates with local literacy initiatives.

  23. Capitalization in Titles and Headings

    Capitalization in Titles and Headings. Published on December 22, 2015 by Sarah Vinz . Revised on July 23, 2023. There are three main options for capitalizing chapter and section headings within your dissertation: capitalizing all significant words, capitalizing only the first word, and a combination of the two.