KCSE Biology Prediction Questions and Answers 2023

The diagram below represents a plant tissue

prediction essay biology 2023

  • Name the structures L and O.                                                                                                      (2 marks)
  •  State the function of structure N and cell labelled M.                                                                             (2marks)
  •  Give two structural differences between phloem tissue and xylem tissue.                                 (2marks)
  •  Distinguish between active and passive immunity.                                                                     (2marks)
  • he following figures represent the forelimb of a certain animal species. Study them and answer the questions that follow

prediction essay biology 2023

  • Name the bones labelled E and G.                                                                                                (2marks)
  •  State the type of skeleton represented by figure 1.                                                                        (1mark)
  •  Name the type of joint at point Q.                                                                                                 (1mark)
  • Which two figures represent analogous structures?                                                                       (1mark)

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 

  •  Give adaptational differences between structures in figure 1 and 3.                                        (3 marks)
  • Colour blindness is a disorder caused by gene mutation and it is controlled by a recessive gene. A man with normal colour vision marries a carrier woman:
  •  Using letter B to represent the gene for normal color vision , what is the chance that their son will be colour blind? Show your working.                                                                                               (4marks)
  • Name another trait in humans inherited in the same way as colour blindness.                              (1mark)                                                                                                                      

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

  • Briefly describe inversion in gene mutation.                                                                                  (1mark)
  • Distinguish between back cross and testcross.                     (2marks)
  •  a) Nitrogen in the atmosphere cannot be directly utilized by plants. State two ways by which this nitrogen is made available for plant use.   (2marks)
  •  State the importance of saprophytic bacteria in the environment.                                               (1mark)

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

  •  Briefly explain the how excessive use of fertilizers affects the large water bodies.                  (3marks)                                                                                

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

  • Explain how competition regulates the animal population in a habitat.                                     (2marks)

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

  •  The figure below shows the parts of the human digestive system. Study it and answer the questions that follow.

prediction essay biology 2023

  •  Name the organs labelled A, B and D.                                                                                        (3marks)

A………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

B………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

D………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

  •  State the role of part labelled C.                                                                                                    (1mark)
  •  Name the two salivary glands in human beings.                                                                         (2marks)

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

  • Give two adaptations of part labelled D to its function.                                                             (2marks)
  • An experiment was carried out to investigate transpiration and absorption of water in sunflower plants in their natural environment with adequate supply of water. The amount of water was determined in a two hour intervals. The results are as shown in the table below.
 
11:00-13:003320
13:00-15:004530
15:00-17:005242
17:00-19:004646
19:00-21:002532
21:00-23:001620
23:00-01:00815
01:00-03:00411

 Using the same axes, plot graphs to show transpiration and absorption of water in grammes against time of the day.                         

Biology KCSE Prediction Questions

Download more revision questions and answers in pdf:.

  • 2023 KCSE Prediction Questions and Answers
  • KCSE Chemistry Prediction Questions and Answers 2023
  • KCSE Business Studies Prediction Questions and Answers 2023
  • 2023 KCSE Mathematics Prediction Questions
  • Mapambazuko ya Machweo KCSE Questions and Answers-…
  • Nguu za Jadi KCSE Questions and Answers- 2024 KCSE…

Get All End of Term Exams, Mock papers, Topical Questions and New Content For the Duraton.
Full Unlimited Access
One Hour: Ksh 100 >| >|
Limited time Offer!

MPESA BuyGoods Till: 858 39 54

OR MPESA BuyGoods Till: 858 39 54

Contact 0726568677 || 0728407013

Clicking "Pay Now" is better and automatic

You can also register
Pay ONCE for ALL content

prediction essay biology 2023

  • HESI ENTRANCE EXAM
  • Exams Bundles
  • NR & NUR Exams
  • AQA PAPERS AND MARK SCHEME
  • Study Material
  • Exams and Certifications
  • PORTAGE LEARNING
  • Ihuman Case Study

prediction essay biology 2023

Learn exams

[email protected].

AQA A-Level Biology Paper 1 Predicted Paper 2023 QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

Section 1 : AQA A-Level Biology Paper 1 Predicted Paper 2023 QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 100 Min

1. AQA A-Level Biology Paper 1 Predicted Paper 2023 QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

  • Description
  • Associate quiz

A-Level Biology 

Predicted Paper 2023

Name ……………………………………………………………………

Date …………………

2 hours allowed.

You may use a scientific calculator and a ruler with millimetre measurements.

Grade boundaries

These are VERY rough guesses! Getting a B on this paper does not guarantee you the same mark in the exam.

To look for the presence of starch in potatoes, a student decided to observe potato cells under a microscope. The image below shows starch grains present in potato cells viewed at a magnification of x400.

a) Describe how the student could have prepared the sample to view under the microscope.

b) Describe how the student identified that these grains contained starch.

c) Calculate the actual length in µm of the starch grain between points A and B.

Actual length = 

d) Plants store excess glucose as starch in their cells. Glucose can also be used to make cellulose to make cell walls.

Explain how the structure of cellulose make it adapted for its function.

a) Explain how water assists in metabolic reactions inside cells.

b) The image below shows a freshwater pond.

State and explain three properties of water that help organisms that live in the pond to survive.

Sugars made in the leaves of plants must be transported to other tissues. One theory states that a pressure gradient is created from the leaves to the roots and that sugars are transported in the phloem under high pressure down the pressure gradient.

a) Describe how high pressure in the phloem of leaves is created.

Experiments have been carried out to find evidence which supports this hypothesis. A scientist wanted to observe the effect of ringing on the movement of substances in the phloem of apple trees.

An experiment was devised and 10 specimen apple trees were picked by the scientist. She took 3 branches of equal diameter from below the leaves of each of the 10 trees and treated them under the following 

Average Rating

prediction essay biology 2023

Join over 1.6 million students using Learnexams real exams, practice tests and expert solutions to improve their grades and reach their goals.

Other Pages

Modal title.

  • Fri. Jul 19th, 2024

2023 KCSE Prediction Mocks- Free Download

Kcse Exams Revision Material

BIOLOGY PAPER 2 -Questions and Answers

' src=

GET THE KCSE PREDICTION BIOLOGY P2 MARKING SCHEMES HERE

SECTION A (40MKS) Bunyore

1. Study the diagram below and answer the questions that follow

prediction essay biology 2023

  • Identify the structure                                                                                             (1mks)

………………………………………………………………………………………………………

  • State the role of the part labeled  R                                                                        (1mk)

………………………………………………………………………………………………

c) A student took a meal of lean meat. Briefly describe the digestion of the food substance where this structure is found                                                                                                            (3mks) …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

(d)What is the role of the following: enterokinase and cholecystokinin in digestion?        (2mk)

Enterokinase. ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Cholecystokinin…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

e) State the deficiency disease associated with lack of vitamin B 2                                       (1mk) ………………………………………………………………………………………………………

2. The diagram below shows how gaseous exchange occurs across the gills in fish.

prediction essay biology 2023

  •  i Name the type of flow shown above                                                                     (1mk)

              ii Explain the advantage of the above flow named in a(i) above.                           (1mk) ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

(b) If the fish is removed from water it dies immediately. Explain why                               (2mks) ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

c) Explain mechanism of gaseous exchange in frog through the skin                                   (4mks) …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 3. A freshly obtained stem from herbaceous measuring 4cm long was split lengthwise to obtain two similar pieces. The pieces were placed in two different solutions of different concentrations in petri dishes (l1 and L2) for 30 minutes. The appearance after 30 minutes is as shown

prediction essay biology 2023

  • State the type of solutions in which L 1 and L 2 was placed                                       (2mks)

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

  • Account for the appearance of the pieces in solutions L 1 and L 2                              (4mks)                                                                           ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
  • State two significance of the biological process involved in the experiment.(2mks)

4 .The diagram below shows structures of the bat wing and human arm.

prediction essay biology 2023

a) These structures are thought to have same ancestral origin.  State one structural similarity and one adaptation difference between the two.

i) Structural similarity.                                                                                                            (1mk)

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

ii) Adaptation difference.                                                                                                       (2mks)

(b)Give two other examples of structures in nature that show the type of evolution as in (a) above.                                                                                                                                               (2mks)

(c)Distinguish between the terms ‘chemical evolution’ and ‘organic evolution’.                 (2mks)

(d) What is the study of fossils called?                                                                                   (1mk)

…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

5. Pure breed of red cows and pure breed of white bulls were crossed to give F 1 calves which had a mixture of red and white coat known as roan. The F 1 were selfed.

(a) Using letter R to represent gene for red colour and W to represent gene for white colour work out the phenotypic ratio of F 2 .                                                                                    (4mks)                                                            

(b) Work out the genotypic ratio of a cross between F 1 offspring and white bull.                 (3mks)

 (c) Comment on the gene(s) controlling the colour of coats in cattle mentioned above.      (1mk)

……………………………………………………………………………………………………

SECTION B (40MKS) GET THE KCSE PREDICTION BIOLOGY P2 MARKING SCHEMES HERE

Answer question 6 (compulsory) and either question 7 or 8 in the spaces provided after question 8.

6. An experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of hormones on growth of lateral buds of three pea plants. The shoots were treated as follows; Shoot A – Apical bud was removed Shoot B – Apical bud was removed and gibberellic acid placed on the cut shoot.

Shoot C – Apical bud was left intact.

 The length of branches developed from lateral buds was determined at regular intervals. The results obtained are as shown in the table below:

    
TIME IN DAYSSHOOT ASHOOT BSHOOT C
333
210123
428488
6509014
88012020
1011815226
  • Using the same axes, draw graphs to show length of branches against time.      (8mks)

prediction essay biology 2023

  • (i) What was the length of the branch in Shoot B on the 7th day?            (1mk) …………………………………………………………………………………………

(ii)What would be the expected length of the branch developing from Shoot A on the 9th day?                                                                                                               (1mk) …………………………………………………………………………………………

 (c) Account for the result obtained in the experiment.                                        (6mks) ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

(d) Why was Shoot C included in the experiment?                                              (1mk) …………………………………………………………………………………………

(e) What is the importance of gibberellic acid in Agriculture?                            (1mk) …………………………………………………………………………………………

(f) State two physiological processes that are brought about by the application of gibberellic acid on plants.                                                                           (2mks)

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

7(a) Describe the process of fertilization in a flowering plant.                                            (14mks)                        

(b) State the changes that take place in a flower after fertilization.                                      (6mks)

8 Describe the structural adaptation of the mammalian heart to its functions                     (20mks)

Related Post

2024 kcse pre mock exams with marking schemes, 2024 term 2 opener form 1 2 3 4 exams plus marking scheme, 2024 mang’u high form 4 pre-mock questions with marking schemes in all subjects, leave a reply cancel reply.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

More Exams Questions and Marking Schemes

Form 4 2024 kcse prediction exam 1 with marking scheme.

  • Tue. Jul 9th, 2024

Newsblaze.co.ke

Newsblaze.co.ke

A site providing Education, TSC, Universities, Helb, Sports and Kuccps news

2023 KCSE Exams Predictions, Revision Papers Plus Marking Schemes

BLOSSOMS ESSAYS S1 Q (2).pdf THE SAMARITAN GUIDE SP S2.pdf FUNCTIONAL WRITING S1.pdf KCSE GRAMMAR REV S1 (2).pdf THE SAMARITAN KCSE ESSAYS S1 (2).pdf CHOZI LA HERI KCSE QNS (2).pdf KCSE INHERITANCE ESSAYS (2).pdf ISIMU JAMII REVISION S1 (2).pdf KCSE CLOZE-TEST REVISION S1 (2).pdf THE SAMARITAN KCSE ESSAYS S2.pdf A DOLL’S EXCERPTS S1 Q (2).pdf A DOLL’S HOUSE GUIDE SP (2).pdf A SILENT SONGS KCSE QNS-1.pdf AN ARTIST OF FLOATING WORLD GUIDE SP-1 (2).pdf BEMBEA YA MAISHA REVISION S3 (2).pdf BEMBEA YA MAISHA S2 Q (2).pdf CHOZI LA HERI GUIDE SP (2).pdf FATHERS OF NATIONS ESSAYS S1 (2).pdf FATHERS OF NATIONS ESSAYS S2 (2).pdf FATHERS OF NATIONS EXCERPTS S1 (2).pdf FATHERS OF NATIONS GUIDE SAMPLE-1.pdf KCSE BEMBEA YA MAISHA QNS-1.pdf KCSE ENGLISH PASSAGES S1 (2).pdf KCSE ENGLISH PP1 REVISION S1 (2).pdf KCSE ENGLISH PP1 REVISION S2 (2).pdf KCSE ENGLISH PP2 REVISION S1 (2).pdf KCSE ENGLISH PP2 REVISION S2 (2).pdf KCSE ENGLISH PP3 REVISION S1 (2).pdf KCSE ORAL NARRATIVE S1.pdf KCSE POETRY REVISION S1 (2).pdf KCSE USHAIRI REVISION S1 (2).pdf MAPAMBAZUKO YA MACHWEO QNS-1 (2).pdf MWONGOZO WA BEMBEA YA MAISHA SAMPLE-1 (2).pdf MWONGOZO WA MAPAMBAZUKO SAMPLE-1 (2).pdf NGUU ZA JADI GUIDE SAMPLE-1 (2).pdf ORAL LITERATURE S1 (2).pdf PARLIAMENT OF OWLS GUIDE SP-1 (2).pdf SILENT SONGS GUIDE SPLE S1-2.pdf

ENG MODEL TEST PAPERS 2023-NEW.pdf F1-4 TOPICAL MATHS.pdf F2 MID TERM 1 2023 EXAMS SET 3.pdf FORM 1 MID TERM 2023 new.pdf KCSE CRE NODEL PAPERS 2023-NEW.pdf KCSE HIST MODEL TEST PAPERS 2023 NEW.pdf KIS KARATASI YA TATU 2023-NEW.pdf MID TERM EXAMS F4 2023-new.pdf MID_TERM_EXAM 1 F3 SET 2 new.pdf

AGRIC PP1 TOP PREDICTION MASTER CYCLES .pdf AGRIC PP2 TOP PREDICTION MASTER CYCLES .pdf BIO .PP1 PREDICTION MASTER CYCLES.pdf BIO PP3 PREDICTION MASTER CYCLES .pdf BUS PP1 TOP PREDICTION MASTER CYCLES .pdf BUS PP2 TOP PREDICTION MASTER CYCLES .pdf CHEM PP1 TOP PREDICTION MASTER CYCLES.pdf CHEM PP2 TOP PREDICTION MASTER CYCLES .pdf CHEM PP3 TOP PREDICTION MASTER CYCLES.pdf COMPUTER TOP PREDICTION MASTER CYCLES .pdf CRE PP1 TOP PREDICTION MASTER CYCLES .pdf CRE PP2 TOP PREDICTION MASTER CYCLES .pdf ENG PP1 TOP PREDICTION MASTER CYCLES .pdf ENG PP2 TOP PREDICTION MASTER CYCLES .pdf ENG PP3 TOP PREDICTION MASTER CYCLES .pdf FRENCH TOP PREDICTION MASTER CYCLES .pdf GEO PP1 TOP PREDICTION MASTER CYCLES .pdf GEO PP2 TOP PREDICTION MASTER CYCLES.pdf HIST PP1 TOP PREDICTION MASTER CYCLES .pdf HIST PP2 TOP PREDICTION MASTER CYCLES .pdf HSC TOP PREDICTION MASTER CYCLES .pdf KIS PP1 TOP PREDICTION MASTER CYCLES .pdf KIS PP2 TOP PREDICTION MASTER CYCLES .pdf KISW PP3 TOP PREDICTION MASTER CYCLES .pdf MAT PP1 TOP PREDICTION MASTER CYCLES.pdf MAT PP2 TOP PREDICTION MASTER CYCLES .pdf

FINAL ENGLISH PREDICTION S1.pdf FINAL KISW PREDICTION S1.pdf TOP SCHOOLS AGRIC S1.pdf TOP SCHOOLS BIOLOGY S1.pdf TOP SCHOOLS BUSINESS S1.pdf TOP SCHOOLS CHEM S1.pdf TOP SCHOOLS COMP S1 (2).pdf TOP SCHOOLS CRE S1.pdf TOP SCHOOLS ENG S1.pdf TOP SCHOOLS FRENCH S1.pdf TOP SCHOOLS GEO S1.pdf TOP SCHOOLS HIST S1.pdf TOP SCHOOLS IRE S1.pdf TOP SCHOOLS KISW S1.pdf TOP SCHOOLS MATHS S1.pdf TOP SCHOOLS PHYSICS S1.pdf

A DOLL’S EXCERPTS S1 Q.pdf GRADE 7 NOTES SCHEMES KCSE PREDICTION EXAMS A DOLL’S HOUSE GUIDE SP.pdf A SILENT SONGS KCSE QNS (2).pdf AN ARTIST OF FLOATING WORLD GUIDE SP-1.pdf BasicEducationActNo_14of2013 (2).pdf BEMBEA YA MAISHA REVISION S3.pdf BEMBEA YA MAISHA S2 Q.pdf BLOSSOMS ESSAYS S1 Q.pdf CHOZI LA HERI GUIDE SP.pdf CHOZI LA HERI KCSE QNS.pdf FATHERS OF NATIONS ESSAYS S1.pdf FATHERS OF NATIONS ESSAYS S2.pdf FATHERS OF NATIONS EXCERPTS S1.pdf FINAL_CIRCULAR_ON_DEPLOYMENT_OF_PRI_SCH_TCHRS_TO_JUNIOR_SEC_SCHOOLS.pdf FORM 2 OPENER EXAM.pdf ISIMU JAMII REVISION S1.pdf KCSE CLOZE-TEST REVISION S1.pdf KCSE ENGLISH PASSAGES S1.pdf KCSE ENGLISH PP1 REVISION S1.pdf KCSE ENGLISH PP1 REVISION S2.pdf KCSE ENGLISH PP2 REVISION S1.pdf KCSE ENGLISH PP2 REVISION S2.pdf KCSE ENGLISH PP3 REVISION S1.pdf KCSE GRAMMAR REV S1.pdf KCSE INHERITANCE ESSAYS.pdf KCSE POETRY REVISION S1.pdf KCSE USHAIRI REVISION S1.pdf MAPAMBAZUKO YA MACHWEO QNS-1.pdf MOE-NEW-SETBOOKS(1).pdf MWONGOZO WA BEMBEA YA MAISHA SAMPLE-1.pdf MWONGOZO WA MAPAMBAZUKO SAMPLE-1.pdf NGUU ZA JADI GUIDE SAMPLE-1.pdf ORAL LITERATURE S1.pdf PARLIAMENT OF OWLS GUIDE SP-1.pdf

Related Post

Revising kcpe- all knec past papers and marking schemes free, grade one environmental activities cbc notes pdf, mathematics notes form 1, 2, 3 and 4, list of all kenya medical training college, kmtc, campuses..

  • Comment Comments
  • Save Article Read Later Read Later

The Year in Biology

December 19, 2023

During 2023, Quanta turned a spotlight on important research progress into the nature of consciousness, the origins of our microbiomes and the timekeeping mechanisms that govern our lives and development, among many other discoveries.

Video : During 2023, Quanta turned a spotlight on important research progress into the nature of consciousness, the origins of our microbiomes and the timekeeping mechanisms that govern our lives and development, among many other discoveries.

Ibrahim Rayintakath for Quanta Magazine (cover); Emily Buder/ Quanta Magazine and Taylor Hess and Noah Hutton for Quanta Magazine  (video)

Introduction

Revolutions in the biological sciences can take many forms. Sometimes they erupt from the use of a novel tool or the invention of a radical theory that suddenly opens so many new avenues for research, it can feel dizzying. Sometimes they take shape slowly, through the slow accumulation of studies, each one representing years of painstaking work, that collectively chip away at the prevailing wisdom and reveal a stronger, better intellectual framework. Both kinds of revolution unleash avalanches of new ideas and insights that improve our understanding of how life works.

This past year has had no shortage of these. For example, researchers successfully grew “embryo models” — lab-grown artificial embryos that mature like real ones — that reached a more advanced developmental stage than ever before. That accomplishment could eventually yield valuable new insights into how human fetuses grow, although debate about the ethical status of those models seems likely, too. Meanwhile, in the world of neuroscience, researchers studying depression have continued to move away from the theory that has generally guided much of the research and pharmaceutical treatment of that disease for decades.

But those kinds of biological revolution involve human ingenuity, with researchers in the life sciences coming to new realizations. Revolutions also occur in the biology itself — when evolution has enabled organisms to do something unprecedented. Biologists have recently discovered many more instances of this kind of breakthrough.

Keeping track of time, for instance, is a function that’s essential to all living things, from microorganisms biding their time till the next cell division to embryos growing limbs and organs, to more complex critters tracking the passage of day and night. Teams of researchers plugging away in laboratories around the world have recently discovered that some key features of timekeeping are tied to cellular metabolism — which means that the organelle called the mitochondrion is both a generator and a clock. Other aspects of timekeeping are metered by the progress of a molecular ballet in which specialized proteins pirouette together before separating again.

Researchers also hope to soon make important discoveries now that they can culture some of the primitive, long-lost cells called Asgard archaea . A billion years ago, Asgard archaea (or cells much like them) took the outrageous step of forming permanent partnerships with the ancestors of mitochondria, thereby giving birth to the first complex cells. The secrets of how and why that biological breakthrough happened may be lurking in those exotic cell cultures. Meanwhile, other researchers are scrutinizing the “grit crust” microbes that live in the infamously arid Atacama Desert of Chile for clues to how the first land-dwelling cells survived.

Enough marvelous biological innovations were discovered in 2023 to form a veritable parade: plankton that supercharged their photosynthetic abilities by repurposing one of their membranes, and underground microbes that learned to make oxygen in total darkness . An immunological trick that protects babies in the womb, and a neurological trick that lets the brain map out social relationships like physical landscapes. A simple mutation that transformed ants into complex social parasites virtually overnight, and a strategic demolition of DNA that worms use to safeguard their genomes.

Quanta chronicled all those and more this year, and as new breakthroughs in fundamental biology come to light in the years ahead, we will be there for them too.

A chemically stained mouse embryo and mouse embryo model against a black background.

University of Cambridge

Pushing the Bounds of Synthetic Life

In the same way that physical scientists build simple model systems as steppingstones to understanding more complex phenomena, some biologists prefer to learn how life works by creating simpler versions. This year they made progress on two fronts: on large scales, in creating “embryo models,” and on small scales, in studying the most minimal cell possible.

Embryo models, or synthetic embryos, are laboratory products of stem cells that can be induced to grow faithfully through the early stages of development, although they self-terminate before reenacting the full embryonic development process. They were devised as potential tools for the ethical experimental study of human development. This year, research groups in Israel and the United Kingdom showed that they could nurture embryo models all the way up through (and possibly beyond) the stage at which research on live human embryos is legally allowed. Researchers in China even briefly initiated pregnancies in monkeys with embryo models. Those successes are considered major breakthroughs for a technique that could help scientists answer important questions about prenatal development, and they might eventually pay off in preventing miscarriages and birth defects. At the same time, the experiments reawakened ethical arguments about this line of research, given that as the embryo models become more developmentally advanced, they can also start to seem more intrinsically deserving of protection.

Synthetic life isn’t always ethically contentious. This year, researchers tested the limits of “minimal” cells , simple organisms derived from bacteria that have been stripped down to their genomic bare bones. These minimal cells have the tools to reproduce, but any genes that aren’t otherwise essential have been removed. In an important validation of how naturally lifelike the minimal cells are, researchers discovered that this minimal genome was able to evolve and adapt. After 300 days of growth and natural selection in the lab, the minimal cells could successfully compete against the ancestral bacteria from which they were derived. The findings demonstrated the robustness of the rules of life — that even after being robbed of nearly every genetic resource, the minimal cells could use the tools of natural selection to recover into more successful life forms.

A person stares at a thought bubble.

Señor Salme for Quanta Magazine

The Investigation of Consciousness

Consciousness is the feeling of being — the awareness of having a unique self, a picture of reality and a place in the world. It’s long been the terrain of philosophers, but recently scientists have made progress (of sorts) in understanding its neurobiological basis.

In an interview on the Joy of Why podcast released in May, the neuroscience researcher Anil Seth of the University of Sussex described consciousness as a kind of “ controlled hallucination , ” in that our experience of reality emerges from within us. None of us can directly know what the world is like; indeed, every organism (and individual) experiences the world differently. Our sense of reality is shaped by the sensory information we take in and the way our brain organizes it and constructs it in our consciousness. In that sense, our entire experience is a hallucination — but it is a controlled hallucination, the brain’s best-guess description of the immediate environment and larger world based on its memories and other encoded information.

Our minds are constantly taking in new external information and also creating their own internal imagery and narratives. How can we distinguish reality from fantasy? This year, researchers discovered that the brain has a “ reality threshold ” against which it constantly evaluates processed signals. Most of our mental images have a pretty weak signal, and so our reality threshold easily consigns them to the “fake” pile. But sometimes our perceptions and imagination can mix, and if those images are strong enough, we can get confused — potentially mistaking our hallucinations for real life.

How does consciousness emerge in the mind? Is it more about thinking, or is it a product of sensory experiences? This year, the results of a high-profile adversarial collaboration that pitted two major theories of consciousness against each other were announced. Over the course of five years, two teams of researchers — one representing global neuronal workspace theory, which focuses on cognition, and the other representing integrated information theory, which focuses on perception — co-created and then led experiments aimed at testing which theory’s predictions were more accurate. The results may have been a letdown for anyone hoping for definitive answers. Onstage in New York City, at the 26th meeting of the Association for the Scientific Study of Consciousness, the researchers acknowledged ways in which the experiments had challenged both theories and highlighted differences between them, but they declined to pronounce either theory the winner. However, the evening wasn’t entirely unsatisfying: The neuroscientist Christof Koch of the Allen Institute for Brain Science conceded a 25-year-old bet with the philosopher David Chalmers of New York University that the neural correlates of consciousness would have been identified by now.

A sad woman stands under an umbrella that is decorated with images of brains, molecules and DNA. Rain falls on her under the umbrella but the day is otherwise clear.

Harol Bustos for Quanta Magazine

New Ideas About Anguish

It’s often taken for granted that depression is caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain: specifically, a chronic deficiency of serotonin, a neurotransmitter that carries messages between nerve cells. Yet even though millions of depressed people around the world get relief from taking Prozac and the other drugs known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIs, based on that theory, decades’ worth of neuropsychiatric research has failed to validate the assumptions of that model. The hum of scientific dissent has been growing louder: An international team of scientists screened more than 350 papers and found no convincing evidence that lower levels of serotonin are associated with depression.

The realization that serotonin deficiency may not be the cause is forcing researchers to fundamentally rethink what depression is. It’s possible that SSRIs alleviate some symptoms of depression by altering other chemicals or processes in the brain that are more direct causes of depression. It’s also possible that what we call “depression” encompasses a variety of disorders that manifest with a similar set of symptoms, including fatigue, apathy, changes in appetite, suicidal thoughts and sleep issues. If that’s the case, significant additional research will be needed to unpack this complexity — to differentiate the kinds and causes of depression and to develop better treatments.

Depression can be an isolating experience. But it is distinct from loneliness, an emotional condition that neuroscientists have better defined in recent years. Loneliness is not the same as social isolation, which is an objective measure of the number of relationships a person is in: Someone can be in many relationships and still be lonely. Nor is it social anxiety, which is a fear of relationships or of certain relational experiences.

Instead, a growing body of neurobiological research suggests that loneliness is a bias in the mind toward interpreting social information in a negative, self-punishing way. It’s as if a survival signal that evolved to urge us to reconnect with the people we rely on has short-circuited, creating a self-perpetuating loop of felt isolation. Scientists haven’t yet found a medical treatment for loneliness, but perhaps simply understanding that negative loop can help the chronically lonely to escape the cycle and find comfort in their existing connections or in new ones.

Colored micrograph of the new Loki Asgard archaeon that was reported in December 2022.

Andreas Klingl, Ludwig Maximilian University; modified by Quanta

The Origins of Complex Life

Where do we come from, and how did we get here? Those timeless questions could be answered in many ways, and they have set numerous biologists on a search for the origins of the eukaryotes — the 2-billion-year-old lineage of life that includes all animals, plants and fungi and many single-celled creatures more complex than bacteria.

The search for the first eukaryote has researchers painstakingly coaxing rare microbes from seafloor sludge. Recently, after six years of work, a European laboratory became only the second to successfully cultivate one of the Asgard archaea — a group of primitive single-celled organisms that have genomes with eyebrow-raising similarities to those of eukaryotes, and that are thought to be ancestral to them. Scientists hope that directly studying the cells in the lab will reveal new information about how eukaryotes evolved and edge us closer to understanding our origins.

The evolutionary journey of that first eukaryote is shrouded in mystery. This year, scientists found a way to fill in an 800-million-year gap in the molecular fossil record between the appearance of the earliest eukaryote and that of the most recent ancestor of all eukaryotes alive today. Previously, when seeking information about eukaryotes that lived in the blank space from roughly 800 million to 1.6 billion years ago, scientists couldn’t find the molecular fossils they expected. But when an Australian team tweaked their search filter to look for fossilized versions of more primitive molecules, they found them in abundance. The findings revealed what the authors call “a lost world” of eukaryotes that helps tell the story of the early evolutionary history of our ancient ancestors.

prediction essay biology 2023

Tagide deCarvalho

Microbiomes Evolve With Us

Research over the last decade has better characterized the microbiome — the collection of microorganisms that live in our guts and elsewhere in our body — and the subtle ways in which it influences our health. This year, scientists revealed in the greatest detail yet where our microbiomes come from and how they evolve throughout our lives.

Unsurprisingly, the first seeds of our microbiome usually come from mom — transmitted during birth and also through breastfeeding. Research published this year found that a mother’s contributions aren’t only whole microbial organisms, but also small snippets of DNA called mobile genetic elements. Up through the first year of life, these mobile genetic elements hop from the mother’s bacteria to the baby’s through a process called horizontal gene transfer. The discovery surprised researchers, who didn’t expect the high degree of coevolution between the mother’s microbiome and the baby’s to go on for so long after birth.

That’s not the end of the story: The microbiome evolves throughout our lives. The largest analysis yet of human microbiome transmission, also published this year, revealed how microbiomes shuffle and reassemble over many decades. It provided clear evidence that microbiome organisms spread between people, especially those with whom we spend the most time, such as family members, partners and roommates. And the study raised the intriguing possibility that some illnesses considered noncommunicable might actually be transmissible, in sometimes subtle ways, through gut flora.

prediction essay biology 2023

Carlos Arrojo for Quanta Magazine

How Life Keeps Time

Eons before the invention of sundials, watches and atomic clocks, organisms evolved biological tools to keep time. They need internal circadian clocks that can keep their metabolic processes in sync with the cycle of day and night, and also clocks akin to calendars to keep their developmental processes on track. This year, researchers made important advances in understanding both.

A flurry of research over the past several years, made possible by new stem cell technologies, has proffered new explanations for what’s known as developmental tempo. All vertebrates start life as a simple embryo — but the rate at which an embryo develops, and the timing of when its tissues mature, dramatically varies between species and determines their final form. What controls the ticking of the developmental clock? This year, a series of careful experiments in labs around the world, focusing on different species and systems, pointed to a common explanation: that fundamental metabolic processes, including biochemical reactions and the gene expression that underlies them, all set the pace. Those metabolic processes appear to be organized fundamentally by the mitochondria, which may very well serve dual roles as the complex cell’s timekeeper and power source.

While those researchers were scattered across the world, novel work on the circadian clock has been done in the lab of a single scientist: the biochemist Carrie Partch at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Partch is driven by a unique obsession not only with the basic steps of the clock, but also with the intricate dance that clock proteins perform as they are built and as they interact and degrade. Like any watchmaker, she isn’t satisfied with knowing what the gears and cogs are — she also needs to understand how they fit together. In paying such close attention to a single system over the course of her career, she has made discoveries about the dance of clock proteins that represent broader truths, for example that unstructured or even disordered proteins are fundamental to biological processes.

Astrocytes from the brain of a mouse are stained in neon colors that emphasize their stretched, starlike shape.

David Robertson, ICR / Science Source

Refining the Brain’s Complexity

One sign of the progress in neuroscience is that it grows continually more precise. Using new tools that are more firmly grounded in sound science, scientists can now focus their attention on defining the quirks of individual brain cells. This year they located the social map of bats, which turned out to be superimposed on the bats’ map of their physical environment — the same exact brain cells in the hippocampus encode multiple kinds of environmental information. Other researchers seem to have resolved a 30-year debate over whether some of the brain’s glial cells — historically considered to be barely more than padding for the more prestigious neurons — can stimulate electrical signals . A team of neuroscientists and clinical researchers, helped by epilepsy patients who had electrodes implanted to improve their medical care, discovered that the brain has different systems for representing small and large numbers. And for the very first time, researchers visualized in three dimensions how an olfactory receptor grabs onto an odor molecule — a significant step in understanding how the nose and brain can intercept airborne chemicals and gain crucial sensory information about the environment.

Get highlights of the most important news delivered to your email inbox

Comment on this article

Quanta Magazine moderates comments to facilitate an informed, substantive, civil conversation. Abusive, profane, self-promotional, misleading, incoherent or off-topic comments will be rejected. Moderators are staffed during regular business hours (New York time) and can only accept comments written in English. 

A close-up image of the head and upper body of a marine worm. Many orange dots are visible through translucent skin, and many clear bristles extend from the body.

Next article

Primrose Kitten

A-Level Biology Predicted Papers - Primrose Kitten

A-Level Biology Predicted Papers

download

📝 Written by experienced teachers and examiners 📝

📋 Exam board-specific content 📋

♻️ Environmentally sensitive digital delivery ♻️

🧐 Thoroughly reviewed and checked 🧐

💪 All papers + video walkthroughs = Bootcamps  💪

🎓All papers + video walkthroughs + live tutorials = Masterclasses  🎓

🤑 Save up to 30% on bootcamps and masterclasses 🤑

📚Maths, science, english, sociology, psychology, geography, history 📚

📆 Brand new questions every year 📆

💞 Supports free education for millions of students worldwide 💞

*These downloads are intended for individual use only. If you are a teacher, school or tutor, please purchase a school licence before you use these with your students.*

To buy the licence, click here .

These are digital downloads; you will not receive a physical copy.

You will have automatically received two e-mails; the second one from Fetch contains a download link. You can just click on this link, and the pdf should start to be downloaded automatically.

The advantage to downloading it from Fetch is that you will be automatically updated if I need to make any changes to the document.

If you can’t find the second e-mail, try checking your spam folder or searching your inbox. If you think you’ve deleted it by mistake or can’t find the email, please get in contact with me.

I've tried to read your mind and think of any problems you might have; I've tried to answer them all here https://primrosekitten.org/faqs/

Customer Reviews

They were very good! many of the predictions were so accurate and it helped me so much in the actual exam and i highly recommend it!!

Topics were on point. The actual paper was just so hard and feel like no one could’ve possibly predicted what the paper was. But yeah topics primrose kitten predicted were 100% spot on

Amazing resource , really helped the student i tutor to check her knowledge and for us to tweak what needed tweaking. Thanks PK!!

Definitely recommend. It tests every bit of knowledge. Would prefer that the walkthrough videos are accessible bc I have to pay extra to be able to view them.

You may also like

Leaving Cert Notes and Sample Answers

Biology Predictions 2024 for Leaving Cert Higher Level

Updated March 2024. Our Biology predictions based on analysis of past papers appear to have coincided and agreed quite closely with one of the mock exams. They were temporarily hidden – and now they are back.

You may also like:

Biology Study Plan

Biology Notes  (€)

Predictions 2024

While it is impossible to be certain about what is coming up, here are areas to pay special attention to for 2024:

Section A (Short Questions):

Food (featured in Section A for the past 15 years)

Ecology (featured 12 times in the past 15 years, did not feature last year)

Cell Division (not featured as short question since 2021, featured 7 times in the 10 years prior)

Genetics & Evolution

Excretion – Kidneys (not featured as a short question since 2018)

Human Reproduction (not featured in short questions since 2021)

Plant Transport & Osmosis (not featured as a short question since 2017)

Section B (Experiments):

A recent trend has been to ask short questions on the Scientific Method in the first parts of an experiment question so it is a good idea to know this well. (Questions 8, 9 & 10 experiment questions come from the same units of the course each year,  appearing periodically based on the amount of time lapsed since they last appeared)

  • Conduct a qualitative test for: Starch, Fat, Reducing Sugar, Protein
  • Isolate DNA from plant tissue
  • Prepare one enzyme immobilisation and examine its application
  • Investigate the effect of light intensity or carbon dioxide on the rate of  photosynthesis
  • Investigate the effect of ph/temperature on the rate of one of the following:  amylase, pepsin or catalase activity

Question 10

  • Investigate the effect of oxygen, water and temperature on germination
  • Investigate the effect of exercise on the breathing rate or pulse rate of a human

Section C (Long Questions):

  • Genetic crosses/DNA and RNA/genetics and evolution
  • Respiration
  • Photosynthesis

Section C (Long Questions with option i.e. Q16 and Q17):

Bacteria, Fungi & Yeast (featured as a long question 13 times in the past 15 years)

Digestive System (not featured as long question for past 2 years)

The Skin/Body Temperature (not featured for the past two years)

Excretion – Kidneys (not featured frequently as option in recent years, not featured last  year)

The Nervous System (featured as an option 10 times in the past 15 years)

Immune System (not featured for the past 2 years)

LC Biology paper layout

Section A: Short Questions  

Answer any five out of seven questions 

Section B: Experiments  

Answer any two of three questions 

Section C: Long Questions  

Answer any four of seven questions. 

An additional part will be added to the last two questions, Q16 and Q17, in which case  candidates answer any two of four parts. 

General patterns of LC Biology questions

Short questions consist of 2 questions from Unit 1, 2 from Unit 2 and 2 from Unit 3. Unit 1: The scientific method, the characteristics of life, food, ecology. Unit 2: Chapters on the cell, enzymes, photosynthesis and respiration, diffusion and osmosis and genetics. Unit 3: The kingdoms of life, chapters on plants and on the human body.

Very common topics for short questions are food, ecology and cell division.

For experimental questions, it is becoming more common to see questions with a variety of different experiments in one question. For example, in 2016 Q7 candidates were asked about a test for a reducing sugar, how to carry out an examination of plant and animal cells and about the immobilisation of an enzyme.

The scientific method is almost always asked about in experimental questions.

Other common experiments include experiments about enzymes (immobilisation, denaturation, effect of temperature and pH on enzyme activity), about plants (digestive activity during germination, conditions necessary for germination) and about using a microscope to examine plant/animal cells.

For long questions, there is almost always a question on genetics (DNA and RNA, genetic crosses, evolution, genetic engineering), ecology, respiration/ photosynthesis/ enzymes and plants (plant responses, structure of flowering plants, exchange in flowering plants, sexual reproduction in flowering plants.

For Q14 and 15, there will almost always be a part (a, b or c) where you have to write about various topics. For example, in 2016 Q15 (c) candidates were asked about the skeleton, a dietary deficiency of a water-soluble vitamin, a genetically sex-linked disease, vaccination, etc.

Human reproduction often features as a part of Q14 or 15.

Food

Food

Ecology

Food

Ecology

Ecology

Ecology

Food

Ecology

Food

Cell division

Cell structure

Vegetative propagation

Viruses

The Lymphatic System

Genetic engineering

Monera

Genetic Crosses

Cell division

Classification of organisms

Plant responses

Respiration

Sexual reproduction of fl. plants

Osmosis and diffusion

Cell division

Excretion

Sexual reproduction of fl. plants / Human reproduction

Cell division

Excretion

Respiration

/ Respiration / How to use a microscope / Food test

Ecology – quantitative study

/ Food test / Enzymes / Examine animal cells

Isolation of DNA

Digestive activity during seed germination

Effect of light intensity/carbon dioxide concentration on the rate of photosynthesis

pH and enzyme activity

Pulse rate / Breathing rate

Leaf yeasts

Examine animal cells / How to use a microscope

Leaf yeasts

/ Conditions needed for seed germination / Examine a plant cell / Osmosis / Isolation of DNA

Digestive activity during seed germination

Ecology /

Dissection of the heart /

Ecology

Ecology

Ecology

DNA and RNA / Genetic crosses

DNA and RNA / Genetic crosses

Blood / The heart / The nervous system

Structure of fl. plants / Exchange in fl. plants / Vegetative propagation

Photosynthesis / Respiration

Human nutrition

The nervous system / The skeleton

Respiration / Enzymes

DNA and RNA / Genetic crosses / Evolution

Excretion

Photosynthesis / Respiration

Exchange in fl. plants / The heart /  The breathing system

Cell structure / Genetic crosses / Evolution

Photosynthesis / Cell division

Plant responses / The senses

Ecology / Evolution

Enzymes / Respiration

Sexual reproduction in fl. plants

Viruses

Evolution

Human defense system

Sexual reproduction in fl. plants

Exchange in fl. plants

The Human defense system

Cell diversity

The nervous system

Structure of fl. plants

Endocrine system

The senses / The nervous system / Human nutrition / Excretion / Sexual reproduction in fl. plants

Diffusion and osmosis

Human reproduction

Exchange in fl. plants

Monera

Homeostasis / Human breathing

The heart

Sexual reproduction in fl. plants

Ecology

Human nutrition / Human defense system / homeostasis / Monera / Diffusion and osmosis

The skeleton

Human reproduction

Fungi 

Ecology

The senses

Human reproduction

Skeleton / Food / Genetic crosses / Endocrine system / Viruses / Pollution / Vegetative propagation

Monera

Ecology – pollution

2023: what we predicted

  • Sexual reproduction
  • Cell division
  • Diffusion and osmosis

A recent trend has been to ask short questions on the Scientific Method in the first parts of an experiment question so it is a good idea to know this well.

  • Visit to an ecosystem – carry6ing out a quantitative study (quadrats), abiotic factors
  • Food tests – test for starch, fat, reducing sugars, and protein
  • Prepare an enzyme immobilisation and examine its application
  • Investigate the effect of water, oxygen, and temperature on germination
  • Dissect, display and identify an ox’s or sheep’s heart
  • Endocrine system
  • Human reproduction
  • Plant structure
  • Immune system
  • The skin/body temperature
  • Bacterial, fungi and yeast
  • Nervous system

2022: what we predicted

  • DNA & RNA
  • Plant structure and transport
  • Blood/circulatory system
  • Use a light microscope to examine animal/plant cells
  • Visit to an ecosystem – carrying out a quantitative study (quadrats), abiotic factors
  • Investigate the effect of temperature on enzyme activity
  • Investigate the influence of light intensity or carbon dioxide on the rate of photosynthesis
  • Investigate the effect of I.A.A. growth regulator on plant tissue
  • Investigate the effect of water, oxygen and temperature on germination
  • Genetic crosses
  • Variation and evolution
  • Human reproductive system
  • Musculoskeletal system
  • Plant responses
  • Plant reproduction

2021: what we predicted

  • Scientific Method
  • Cell Division
  • Prepare and show the production of alcohol by yeast
  • Investigate the influence of light intensity or carbon dioxide concentration on the rate of photosynthesis
  • Prepare and examine microscopically a transverse section of a dicotyledonous stem
  • DNA & RNA/Genetics
  • Blood/human circulatory system
  • Human nutrition
  • Cell diversity

2020: what we predicted

Short Questions: 

  • Human Nutrition
  • Plant Reproduction

Experiments: 

  • How to use a microscope
  • Dissection of the heart
  • Ecology – quantitative study
  • Enzymes – temperature/ pH/ heat denaturation/ immobilisation
  • Digestive activity during seed germination
  • *Note that The Scientific Method almost always form part of an experiment question*

Long Questions: 

  • Photosynthesis/ Respiration
  • Genetic Crosses/ DNA and RNA

Long Questions with options (Q14 and Q15)

  • Human Defence System
  • Human Reproduction
  • Plant Responses
  • Transport, storage and gas exchange in flowering plants

2019: what we predicted

For your reference, this is what came up in 2019:

  • Cell Structure
  • Blood vessels/ Human Breathing
  • Food tests/ Prepare and examine animal cells/ Isolate DNA from plant tissue/ Investigate the effect of IAA on plant tissue/ Investigate osmosis
  • Prepare and examine a transverse section of a dicot stem

Long Questions

  • DNA and RNA/ Protein synthesis/ Genetic crosses
  • Enzymes/ Photosynthesis

Long Questions with options (Q14 and Q5)

  • Nervous system/ Endocrine system
  • Immune system/ Plant responses/ Bacteria/ Heart
  • Digestive system

This is what we had predicted:

Short Questions

Food Ecology Respiration Cell division The skeleton and muscles Protista

Experiments

Denaturation/ immobilisation of enzymes Show the production of alcohol by yeast Pulse rate/ breathing rate Dissection of the heart Effect of IAA on plant tissue

Ecology DNA and RNA/ Genetic crosses Sexual reproduction of flowering plants Photosynthesis/ respiration Long Questions with options (Q14 and Q5)

Fungi Plant responses Human nutrition/ food Diffusion and osmosis Human reproduction The nervous system

Not bad, eh?

  • Post author: Martina
  • Post published: January 22, 2024
  • Post category: Biology / Predictions

You Might Also Like

Leaving cert geography predictions 2024 (higher level), cell structure: notes and sample answers, leaving cert english predictions 2024 (higher level).

  • International
  • Education Jobs
  • Schools directory
  • Resources Education Jobs Schools directory News Search

Summer 2024 AQA A Level Biology Predicted Exam - Paper 3

Summer 2024 AQA A Level Biology Predicted Exam - Paper 3

Subject: Biology

Age range: 16+

Resource type: Assessment and revision

Empirical Tuition

Last updated

24 May 2024

  • Share through email
  • Share through twitter
  • Share through linkedin
  • Share through facebook
  • Share through pinterest

prediction essay biology 2023

Back by popular demand for a third year! Our heads of department have once again been hard at work to create a series of predicted exams for Summer 2024!

These questions are completely original and have been designed from scratch. There has been no reuse of previous exam questions.

This is for the following paper: AQA A Level Biology Paper 3 (7402/3)

Our predicted paper follows the format of the true AQA A Level Biology Paper 3 closely. It is also the exact duration and mark-count, with questions of increasing difficulty and the obligatory essay question. A mark scheme is also attached.

The paper covers the following specification points:

• 3.2.1 - Cell structure • 3.2.4 - Cell recognition and the immune system • 3.5.2 - Respiration • 3.6.4 - Homeostasis is the maintenance of a stable internal environment • 3.7.2 - Populations • 3.7.4 - Evolution may lead to speciation • 3.8.2 - Gene expression is controlled by a number of features

Disclaimer: This document was created by department heads with many years of experience teaching the AQA A Level Biology course. We cannot however guarantee that it is an accurate representation of the 2024 examinations and students should not treat it as such. Please use this as an aid, alongside other methods of revision.

Tes paid licence How can I reuse this?

Get this resource as part of a bundle and save up to 54%

A bundle is a package of resources grouped together to teach a particular topic, or a series of lessons, in one place.

AQA A Level Biology Presentations + 2024 Predicted Papers - The Complete Course

**The complete AQA A Level Biology** course from start to finish. **Huge bundle** of resources with every topic covered. **Now includes the 2024 Predicted Papers!** Complete set of concise, modern presentations for **AQA A Level Biology** (7401 and 7402) **Chapters 1 - 8**. Contains colour coded specification points with **handmade vector graphics**. **Sixty one** presentations included: 1 - Monomers and Polymers 2 - Carbohydrates 3 - Lipids 4 - Proteins 5 - Enzymes 6 - Factors Affecting Enzymes 7 - DNA and RNA 8 - ATP, Water and Inorganic Ions 9 - Eukaryotic Cells 10 - Prokaryotic Cells and Viruses 11 - Analysing Cell Components 12 - Cell Division 13 - Cell Membranes 14 - Transport Across Membranes 15 - The Immune System 16 - Immunity, Vaccines and Monoclonal Antibodies 17 - HIV and Viruses 18 - Size and Surface Area 19 - Gas Exchange 20 - Gas Exchange in Humans 21 - Lung Disease 22 - Digestion and Absorption 23 - Haemoglobin 24 - The Circulatory System 25 - Cardiovascular Disease 26 - Xylem and Phloem 27 - DNA, Genes and Chromosomes 28 - Transcription and Translation 29 - Meiosis and Genetic Variation 30 - Mutations 31 - Genetic Diversity 32 - Natural Selection 33 - Classifying Organisms 34 - Biodiversity 35 - Investigating Variation 36 - Photosynthesis and the Light Dependent Reaction 37 - Photosynthesis and the Light Independent Reaction 38 - The Rate of Photosynthesis 39 - Respiration 40 - Energy and Ecosystems 41 - Nutrient Cycles 42 - Survival and Response 43 - Receptors and Effectors 44 - The Control of Heart Rate 45 - Nerves and Synapses 46 - Muscles 47 - Homeostasis 48 - Controlling Blood Glucose 49 - The Kidneys 50 - Genetics 51 - Linkage and Epistasis 52 - Variation and Speciation 53 - Populations and Ecosystems 54 - Ecological Sampling 55 - Succession 56 - Conservation 57 - Mutations and Cancer 58 - Stem Cells 59 - Gene Expression 60 - Gene Technologies 61 - Gene Therapy and Genetic Fingerprinting

Summer 2024 AQA A Level Biology Predicted Exams - Papers 1-3

**UPDATE! The issue with downloading Paper 1 is now fixed!** **Back by popular demand for a third year! Our heads of department have once again been hard at work to create a series of predicted exams for Summer 2024!** **Look no further, the complete set of AQA A Level Biology (7402) predicted exams. 3 full papers with mark schemes.** These questions are completely original and have been designed from scratch. There has been no reuse of previous exam questions. This is for the following papers: 7402/1, 7402/2 and 7402/3 For Paper 1: Our predicted paper follows the format of the true AQA A Level Biology Paper 1 closely. It is also the exact duration and mark-count, with questions of increasing difficulty. A mark scheme is also attached. The paper covers the following specification points: • 3.1.2 - Carbohydrates • 3.1.4 - Proteins • 3.1.5 - Nucleic acids are important information-carrying molecules • 3.2.1 - Cell structure • 3.2.3 - Transport across cell membranes • 3.3.4 - Mass transport • 3.4.2 - DNA and protein synthesis • 3.4.5 - Species and taxonomy • 3.4.6 - Biodiversity within a community • 3.4.7 - Investigating biodiversity For Paper 2: Our predicted paper follows the format of the true AQA A Level Biology Paper 2 closely. It is also the exact duration and mark-count, with questions of increasing difficulty. A mark scheme is also attached. The paper covers the following specification points: • 3.5.1 - Photosynthesis • 3.5.3 - Energy and ecosystems • 3.5.4 - Nutrient cycles • 3.6.1 - Stimuli, both internal and external, are detected and lead to a response • 3.6.2 - Nervous communication • 3.7.1 - Inheritance • 3.7.4 - Populations in ecosystems • 3.8.1 - Alteration of the sequence of bases in DNA can alter the structure of proteins • 3.8.4 - Recombinant DNA technology For Paper 3: Our predicted paper follows the format of the true AQA A Level Biology Paper 3 closely. It is also the exact duration and mark-count, with questions of increasing difficulty and the obligatory essay question. A mark scheme is also attached. The paper covers the following specification points: • 3.2.1 - Cell structure • 3.2.4 - Cell recognition and the immune system • 3.5.2 - Respiration • 3.6.4 - Homeostasis is the maintenance of a stable internal environment • 3.7.2 - Populations • 3.7.4 - Evolution may lead to speciation • 3.8.2 - Gene expression is controlled by a number of features **Disclaimer: This document was created by department heads with many years of experience teaching the AQA A Level Biology course. We cannot however guarantee that it is an accurate representation of the 2024 examinations and students should not treat it as such. Please use this as an aid, alongside other methods of revision.**

Your rating is required to reflect your happiness.

It's good to leave some feedback.

Something went wrong, please try again later.

ocarpenter15

Fab exams, great content and nicely presented - will be buying again!

Empty reply does not make any sense for the end user

Report this resource to let us know if it violates our terms and conditions. Our customer service team will review your report and will be in touch.

Not quite what you were looking for? Search by keyword to find the right resource:

prediction essay biology 2023

McKinsey technology trends outlook 2024

Despite challenging overall market conditions in 2023, continuing investments in frontier technologies promise substantial future growth in enterprise adoption. Generative AI (gen AI) has been a standout trend since 2022, with the extraordinary uptick in interest and investment in this technology unlocking innovative possibilities across interconnected trends such as robotics and immersive reality. While the macroeconomic environment with elevated interest rates has affected equity capital investment and hiring, underlying indicators—including optimism, innovation, and longer-term talent needs—reflect a positive long-term trajectory in the 15 technology trends we analyzed.

What’s new in this year’s analysis

This year, we reflected the shifts in the technology landscape with two changes on the list of trends: digital trust and cybersecurity (integrating what we had previously described as Web3 and trust architectures) and the future of robotics. Robotics technologies’ synergy with AI is paving the way for groundbreaking innovations and operational shifts across the economic and workforce landscapes. We also deployed a survey to measure adoption levels across trends.

These are among the findings in the latest McKinsey Technology Trends Outlook, in which the McKinsey Technology Council  identified the most significant technology trends unfolding today. This research is intended to help executives plan ahead by developing an understanding of potential use cases, sources of value, adoption drivers, and the critical skills needed to bring these opportunities to fruition.

Our analysis examines quantitative measures of interest, innovation, investment, and talent to gauge the momentum of each trend. Recognizing the long-term nature and interdependence of these trends, we also delve into the underlying technologies, uncertainties, and questions surrounding each trend. (For more about new developments in our research, please see the sidebar “What’s new in this year’s analysis”; for more about the research itself, please see the sidebar “Research methodology.”)

New and notable

The two trends that stood out in 2023 were gen AI and electrification and renewables. Gen AI has seen a spike of almost 700 percent in Google searches from 2022 to 2023, along with a notable jump in job postings and investments. The pace of technology innovation has been remarkable. Over the course of 2023 and 2024, the size of the prompts that large language models (LLMs) can process, known as “context windows,” spiked from 100,000 to two million tokens. This is roughly the difference between adding one research paper to a model prompt and adding about 20 novels to it. And the modalities that gen AI can process have continued to increase, from text summarization and image generation to advanced capabilities in video, images, audio, and text. This has catalyzed a surge in investments and innovation aimed at advancing more powerful and efficient computing systems. The large foundation models that power generative AI, such as LLMs, are being integrated into various enterprise software tools and are also being employed for diverse purposes such as powering customer-facing chatbots, generating ad campaigns, accelerating drug discovery, and more. We expect this expansion to continue, pushing the boundaries of AI capabilities. Senior leaders’ awareness of gen AI innovation has increased interest, investment, and innovation in AI technologies, such as robotics, which is a new addition to our trends analysis this year. Advancements in AI are ushering in a new era of more capable robots, spurring greater innovation and a wider range of deployments.

Research methodology

To assess the development of each technology trend, our team collected data on five tangible measures of activity: search engine queries, news publications, patents, research publications, and investment. For each measure, we used a defined set of data sources to find occurrences of keywords associated with each of the 15 trends, screened those occurrences for valid mentions of activity, and indexed the resulting numbers of mentions on a 0–1 scoring scale that is relative to the trends studied. The innovation score combines the patents and research scores; the interest score combines the news and search scores. (While we recognize that an interest score can be inflated by deliberate efforts to stimulate news and search activity, we believe that each score fairly reflects the extent of discussion and debate about a given trend.) Investment measures the flows of funding from the capital markets into companies linked with the trend.

Data sources for the scores include the following:

  • Patents. Data on patent filings are sourced from Google Patents, where the data highlight the number of granted patents.
  • Research. Data on research publications are sourced from Lens.
  • News. Data on news publications are sourced from Factiva.
  • Searches. Data on search engine queries are sourced from Google Trends.
  • Investment. Data on private-market and public-market capital raises (venture capital and corporate and strategic M&A, including joint ventures), private equity (including buyouts and private investment in public equity), and public investments (including IPOs) are sourced from PitchBook.
  • Talent demand. Number of job postings is sourced from McKinsey’s proprietary Organizational Data Platform, which stores licensed, de-identified data on professional profiles and job postings. Data are drawn primarily from English-speaking countries.

In addition, we updated the selection and definition of trends from last year’s report to reflect the evolution of technology trends:

  • The future of robotics trend was added since last year’s publication.
  • Data sources and keywords were updated. For data on the future of space technologies investments, we used research from McKinsey’s Aerospace & Defense Practice.

Finally, we used survey data to calculate the enterprise-wide adoption scores for each trend:

  • Survey scope. The survey included approximately 1,000 respondents from 50 countries.
  • Geographical coverage. Survey representation was balanced across Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, and North America.
  • Company size. Size categories, based on annual revenue, included small companies ($10 million to $50 million), medium-size companies ($50 million to $1 billion), and large companies (greater than $1 billion).
  • Respondent profile. The survey was targeted to senior-level professionals knowledgeable in technology, who reported their perception of the extent to which their organizations were using the technologies.
  • Survey method. The survey was conducted online to enhance reach and accessibility.
  • Question types. The survey employed multiple-choice and open-ended questions for comprehensive insights.
  • 1: Frontier innovation. This technology is still nascent, with few organizations investing in or applying it. It is largely untested and unproven in a business context.
  • 2: Experimentation. Organizations are testing the functionality and viability of the technology with a small-scale prototype, typically done without a strong focus on a near-term ROI. Few companies are scaling or have fully scaled the technology.
  • 3: Piloting. Organizations are implementing the technology for the first few business use cases. It may be used in pilot projects or limited deployments to test its feasibility and effectiveness.
  • 4: Scaling. Organizations are in the process of scaling the deployment and adoption of the technology across the enterprise. The technology is being scaled by a significant number of companies.
  • 5: Fully scaled. Organizations have fully deployed and integrated the technology across the enterprise. It has become the standard and is being used at a large scale as companies have recognized the value and benefits of the technology.

Electrification and renewables was the other trend that bucked the economic headwinds, posting the highest investment and interest scores among all the trends we evaluated. Job postings for this sector also showed a modest increase.

Although many trends faced declines in investment and hiring in 2023, the long-term outlook remains positive. This optimism is supported by the continued longer-term growth in job postings for the analyzed trends (up 8 percent from 2021 to 2023) and enterprises’ continued innovation and heightened interest in harnessing these technologies, particularly for future growth.

Photo of McKinsey Partners, Lareina Yee and Roger Roberts

Future frontiers: Navigating the next wave of tech innovations

Join Lareina Yee and Roger Roberts on Tuesday, July 30, at 12:30 p.m. EDT/6:30 p.m. CET as they discuss the future of these technological trends, the factors that will fuel their growth, and strategies for investing in them through 2024 and beyond.

In 2023, technology equity investments fell by 30 to 40 percent to approximately $570 billion due to rising financing costs and a cautious near-term growth outlook, prompting investors to favor technologies with strong revenue and margin potential. This approach aligns with the strategic perspective leading companies are adopting, in which they recognize that fully adopting and scaling cutting-edge technologies is a long-term endeavor. This recognition is evident when companies diversify their investments across a portfolio of several technologies, selectively intensifying their focus on areas most likely to push technological boundaries forward. While many technologies have maintained cautious investment profiles over the past year, gen AI saw a sevenfold increase in investments, driven by substantial advancements in text, image, and video generation.

About QuantumBlack, AI by McKinsey

QuantumBlack, McKinsey’s AI arm, helps companies transform using the power of technology, technical expertise, and industry experts. With thousands of practitioners at QuantumBlack (data engineers, data scientists, product managers, designers, and software engineers) and McKinsey (industry and domain experts), we are working to solve the world’s most important AI challenges. QuantumBlack Labs is our center of technology development and client innovation, which has been driving cutting-edge advancements and developments in AI through locations across the globe.

Despite an overall downturn in private equity investment, the pace of innovation has not slowed. Innovation has accelerated in the three trends that are part of the “AI revolution” group: gen AI, applied AI, and industrializing machine learning. Gen AI creates new content from unstructured data (such as text and images), applied AI leverages machine learning models for analytical and predictive tasks, and industrializing machine learning accelerates and derisks the development of machine learning solutions. Applied AI and industrializing machine learning, boosted by the widening interest in gen AI, have seen the most significant uptick in innovation, reflected in the surge in publications and patents from 2022 to 2023. Meanwhile, electrification and renewable-energy technologies continue to capture high interest, reflected in news mentions and web searches. Their popularity is fueled by a surge in global renewable capacity, their crucial roles in global decarbonization efforts, and heightened energy security needs amid geopolitical tensions and energy crises.

The talent environment largely echoed the investment picture in tech trends in 2023. The technology sector faced significant layoffs, particularly among large technology companies, with job postings related to the tech trends we studied declining by 26 percent—a steeper drop than the 17 percent decrease in global job postings overall. The greater decline in demand for tech-trends-related talent may have been fueled by technology companies’ cost reduction efforts amid decreasing revenue growth projections. Despite this reduction, the trends with robust investment and innovation, such as gen AI, not only maintained but also increased their job postings, reflecting a strong demand for new and advanced skills. Electrification and renewables was the other trend that saw positive job growth, partially due to public sector support for infrastructure spending.

Even with the short-term vicissitudes in talent demand, our analysis of 4.3 million job postings across our 15 tech trends underscored a wide skills gap. Compared with the global average, fewer than half the number of potential candidates have the high-demand tech skills specified in job postings. Despite the year-on-year decreases for job postings in many trends from 2022 to 2023, the number of tech-related job postings in 2023 still represented an 8 percent increase from 2021, suggesting the potential for longer-term growth (Exhibit 1).

Enterprise technology adoption momentum

The trajectory of enterprise technology adoption is often described as an S-curve that traces the following pattern: technical innovation and exploration, experimenting with the technology, initial pilots in the business, scaling the impact throughout the business, and eventual fully scaled adoption (Exhibit 2). This pattern is evident in this year’s survey analysis of enterprise adoption conducted across our 15 technologies. Adoption levels vary across different industries and company sizes, as does the perceived progress toward adoption.

Technologies progress through different stages, with some at the leading edge of innovation and others approaching large-scale adoption.

Image description:

A graph depicts the adoption curve of technology trends, scored from 1 to 5, where 1 represents frontier innovation, located at the bottom left corner of the curve; 2 is experimenting, located slightly above frontier innovation; 3 is piloting, which follows the upward trajectory of the curve; 4 is scaling, marked by a vertical ascent as adoption increases; and 5 is fully scaled, positioned at the top of the curve, indicating near-complete adoption.

In 2023, the trends are positioned along the adoption curve as follows: future of space technologies and quantum technologies are at the frontier innovation stage; climate technologies beyond electrification and renewables, future of bioengineering, future of mobility, future of robotics, and immersive-reality technologies are at the experimenting stage; digital trust and cybersecurity, electrification and renewables, industrializing machine learning, and next-gen software development are at the piloting stage; and advanced connectivity, applied AI, cloud and edge computing, and generative AI are at the scaling stage.

Footnote: Trend is more relevant to certain industries, resulting in lower overall adoption across industries compared with adoption within relevant industries.

Source: McKinsey technology adoption survey data

End of image description.

We see that the technologies in the S-curve’s early stages of innovation and experimenting are either on the leading edge of progress, such as quantum technologies and robotics, or are more relevant to a specific set of industries, such as bioengineering and space. Factors that could affect the adoption of these technologies include high costs, specialized applications, and balancing the breadth of technology investments against focusing on a select few that may offer substantial first-mover advantages.

As technologies gain traction and move beyond experimenting, adoption rates start accelerating, and companies invest more in piloting and scaling. We see this shift in a number of trends, such as next-generation software development and electrification. Gen AI’s rapid advancement leads among trends analyzed, about a quarter of respondents self-reporting that they are scaling its use. More mature technologies, like cloud and edge computing and advanced connectivity, continued their rapid pace of adoption, serving as enablers for the adoption of other emerging technologies as well (Exhibit 3).

More-mature technologies are more widely adopted, often serving as enablers for more-nascent technologies.

A segmented bar graph shows the adoption levels of tech trends in 2023 as a percentage of respondents. The trends are divided into 5 segments, comprising 100%: fully scaled, scaling, piloting, experimenting, and not investing. The trends are arranged based on the combined percentage sum of fully scaled and scaling shares. Listed from highest to lowest, these combined percentages are as follows:

  • cloud and edge computing at 48%
  • advanced connectivity at 37%
  • generative AI at 36%
  • applied AI at 35%
  • next-generation software development at 31%
  • digital trust and cybersecurity at 30%
  • electrification and renewables at 28%
  • industrializing machine learning at 27%
  • future of mobility at 21%
  • climate technologies beyond electrification and renewables at 20%
  • immersive-reality technologies at 19%
  • future of bioengineering at 18%
  • future of robotics at 18%
  • quantum technologies at 15%
  • future of space technologies at 15%

The process of scaling technology adoption also requires a conducive external ecosystem where user trust and readiness, business model economics, regulatory environments, and talent availability play crucial roles. Since these ecosystem factors vary by geography and industry, we see different adoption scenarios playing out. For instance, while the leading banks in Latin America are on par with their North American counterparts in deploying gen AI use cases, the adoption of robotics in manufacturing sectors varies significantly due to differing labor costs affecting the business case for automation.

As executives navigate these complexities, they should align their long-term technology adoption strategies with both their internal capacities and the external ecosystem conditions to ensure the successful integration of new technologies into their business models. Executives should monitor ecosystem conditions that can affect their prioritized use cases to make decisions about the appropriate investment levels while navigating uncertainties and budgetary constraints on the way to full adoption (see the “Adoption developments across the globe” sections within each trend or particular use cases therein that executives should monitor). Across the board, leaders who take a long-term view—building up their talent, testing and learning where impact can be found, and reimagining the businesses for the future—can potentially break out ahead of the pack.

Lareina Yee is a senior partner in McKinsey’s Bay Area office, where Michael Chui  is a McKinsey Global Institute partner, Roger Roberts  is a partner, and Mena Issler is an associate partner.

The authors wish to thank the following McKinsey colleagues for their contributions to this research: Aakanksha Srinivasan, Ahsan Saeed, Alex Arutyunyants, Alex Singla, Alex Zhang, Alizee Acket-Goemaere, An Yan, Anass Bensrhir, Andrea Del Miglio, Andreas Breiter, Ani Kelkar, Anna Massey, Anna Orthofer, Arjit Mehta, Arjita Bhan, Asaf Somekh, Begum Ortaoglu, Benjamin Braverman, Bharat Bahl, Bharath Aiyer, Bhargs Srivathsan, Brian Constantine, Brooke Stokes, Bryan Richardson, Carlo Giovine, Celine Crenshaw, Daniel Herde, Daniel Wallance, David Harvey, Delphine Zurkiya, Diego Hernandez Diaz, Douglas Merrill, Elisa Becker-Foss, Emma Parry, Eric Hazan, Erika Stanzl, Everett Santana, Giacomo Gatto, Grace W Chen, Hamza Khan, Harshit Jain, Helen Wu, Henning Soller, Ian de Bode, Jackson Pentz, Jeffrey Caso, Jesse Klempner, Jim Boehm, Joshua Katz, Julia Perry, Julian Sevillano, Justin Greis, Kersten Heineke, Kitti Lakner, Kristen Jennings, Liz Grennan, Luke Thomas, Maria Pogosyan, Mark Patel, Martin Harrysson, Martin Wrulich, Martina Gschwendtner, Massimo Mazza, Matej Macak, Matt Higginson, Matt Linderman, Matteo Cutrera, Mellen Masea, Michiel Nivard, Mike Westover, Musa Bilal, Nicolas Bellemans, Noah Furlonge-Walker, Obi Ezekoye, Paolo Spranzi, Pepe Cafferata, Robin Riedel, Ryan Brukardt, Samuel Musmanno, Santiago Comella-Dorda, Sebastian Mayer, Shakeel Kalidas, Sharmila Bhide, Stephen Xu, Tanmay Bhatnagar, Thomas Hundertmark, Tinan Goli, Tom Brennan, Tom Levin-Reid, Tony Hansen, Vinayak HV, Yaron Haviv, Yvonne Ferrier, and Zina Cole.

They also wish to thank the external members of the McKinsey Technology Council for their insights and perspectives, including Ajay Agrawal, Azeem Azhar, Ben Lorica, Benedict Evans, John Martinis, and Jordan Jacobs.

Special thanks to McKinsey Global Publishing colleagues Barr Seitz, Diane Rice, Kanika Punwani, Katie Shearer, LaShon Malone, Mary Gayen, Nayomi Chibana, Richard Johnson, Stephen Landau, and Victor Cuevas for making this interactive come alive.

Explore a career with us

Related articles.

Blue, green, red, brown and white wire in wave pattern on dark blue background - stock photo

Rewired and running ahead: Digital and AI leaders are leaving the rest behind

Close-up eye and a futuristic data screen panel on a dark blue background.

False friends or good ends? The CIO’s four-point guide to navigating technology trends

AQA Alevel Biology 2023

Avatar for MedApplicantttt

Scroll to see replies

Avatar for fdjhjdfsjfdj

Quick Reply

Related discussions.

  • A Level Exam Discussions 2023
  • GCSE Exam Discussions 2023
  • GCSE Biology Study Group 2022-2023
  • Alevel Psychology
  • aqa british empire a level 1j
  • ⭐niamhcheesecake's Yr 11 journal: help me conquer Gcse's :(( ⭐
  • A Level subject regrets? Art>Biology
  • maths replacement
  • Can I take alevel religious studies if I want to be a dentist?
  • Westminster 16+ Entrance Exam
  • AQA GCSE Biology Paper 1 Foundation Tier [16th May 2023] Exam Chat
  • How much Maths in Biology and Psychology A Level?
  • help in AQA a-level biology
  • Do universities allow gcse English language resits?
  • 2023 AQA Alevel Biology Paper 1
  • A level Help
  • a biology mark scheme
  • Do we need to know research methods content for AQA Psych Paper 1?
  • Predictions for 2024 History AQA 1J British Empire?

Last reply 6 days ago

Last reply 3 weeks ago

Last reply 4 weeks ago

Last reply 1 month ago

Articles for you

Students react after A-level Biology Paper 1 on 7 June 2023

Students react after A-level Biology Paper 1 on 7 June 2023

Students react after A-level Biology Paper 2 on 16 June 2023

Students react after A-level Biology Paper 2 on 16 June 2023

Students react after A-level Biology Paper 3 on 21 June

Students react after A-level Biology Paper 3 on 21 June

Students react after GCSE Biology Paper 1 on 16 May 2023

Students react after GCSE Biology Paper 1 on 16 May 2023

IMAGES

  1. Summer 2023 IGCSE Biology Predicted Exams

    prediction essay biology 2023

  2. KCSE 2023 BIOLOGY PAPER 1 TOP PREDICTION MASTER CYCLES

    prediction essay biology 2023

  3. AQA A-Level Biology Paper 1,2 & 3 Predicted Papers 2023 attached with

    prediction essay biology 2023

  4. GCSE PREDICTED 2023 COMBINED SCIENCE BIOLOGY PAPER 1

    prediction essay biology 2023

  5. AQA GCSE Biology Paper 1

    prediction essay biology 2023

  6. 2023 Biology p2 Section B essay prediction

    prediction essay biology 2023

VIDEO

  1. AQA Separate Science GCSE biology Paper 2 2023 predictions #gcses2023 #gcserevision

  2. Ms solutions Biology prediction #mssolutions

  3. Should you get the predicted papers? #gcses2023 #gcsescience #gcsebiology

  4. Прогноз на ЕГЭ 2023 по биологии

  5. 2024 KCSE predictions Biology Essay.Biology paper 2

  6. 2023 SCIENCE PAPER 1 PREDICTION FOR INTERNALS ECZ

COMMENTS

  1. 2023 Biology A level AQA predicted essay

    Students react after A-level Biology Paper 1 on 7 June 2023. Students react after A-level Biology Paper 2 on 16 June 2023. Students react after A-level Biology Paper 3 on 21 June. Finding a university place in Ucas Clearing 2024: 10 top tips to help you get ready

  2. KCSE Biology Final Prediction 2023

    KCSE 2023 FINAL PREDICTION BIOLOGY (KCSE PREDICTIONS 1-10) ##### Confidential Analysis of Possible Expected sample KCSE ##### Questions most likely to be tested in the Forthcoming KNEC ##### examinations scheduled for November 2023. The following are Expected Questions in KCSE 2023 EXAM.

  3. KCSE Biology Prediction Questions and Answers 2023

    KCSE Biology Prediction Questions and Answers 2023. By Dean of Studies / August 29, 2023 . ... 2023 KCSE Prediction Questions and Answers; ... Essay Questions : Free Exams with Marking Schemes; Kenya High School Past Papers; Download Exams Here; Exams 2022;

  4. AQA A-Level Biology Paper 1 Predicted Paper 2023 QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

    1. AQA A-Level Biology Paper 1 Predicted Paper 2023 QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS. 100 Min

  5. ESSAY titles: UPDATED. Plans for 3 essay titles. # ...

    Here are my 3 essay predictions for AQA A level Biology paper 3 (Exams 2022)** Please do not JUST learn these for the exam. The titles may be similar but ar...

  6. AQA A-Level Biology Paper 3

    I want to help you achieve the grades you (and I) know you are capable of; these grades are the stepping stone to your future. Even if you don't want to stud...

  7. Summer 2024 AQA A Level Biology Predicted Exams

    Our predicted paper follows the format of the true AQA A Level Biology Paper 3 closely. It is also the exact duration and mark-count, with questions of increasing difficulty and the obligatory essay question. A mark scheme is also attached. The paper covers the following specification points: • 3.2.1 - Cell structure

  8. PDF Kcse 2023 Regional Mocks Biology

    kcse 2023 regional mocks biology the pdf comprises a compilation of top 4 joint national mocks across the 47 counties for the kcse class of 2023 for marking schemes: contact: mr machuki - 0724333200 or order online at: www.kenyaeducators.co.ke kenya educators consultancy

  9. PDF 231/2 BIOLOGY PAPER 2 Time: 2 hours KCSE 2023 PREDICTION MASTER CYCLE 4

    Compiled and Distributed by Kenya Educators Consultancy, P.O.BOX 15400-00500, Nairobi. Tel 0724333200 E-mail [email protected]. ORDER MARKING SCHEMES AT

  10. GCSE 2023 Predictions AQA (Biology)

    This is a copy of the GCSE AQA predictions that I shared with my department. It is not an exhaustive list and of course all students should revise everything. The document contains both paper 1 and paper 2 predictions for both Biology Combined Science (Trilogy) and Separate Science (Triple).

  11. BIOLOGY PAPER 2 -Questions and Answers

    SECTION B (40MKS) GET THE KCSE PREDICTION BIOLOGY P2 MARKING SCHEMES HERE. Answer question 6 (compulsory) and either question 7 or 8 in the spaces provided after question 8. 6. An experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of hormones on growth of lateral buds of three pea plants. ... KCPE Prediction 2023 KNAT 008 Class 8 Exams ...

  12. 2023 KCSE Exams Predictions, Revision Papers Plus Marking Schemes

    2023 KCSE Exams Predictions, Revision Papers Plus Marking Schemes BLOSSOMS ESSAYS S1 Q (2).pdf THE SAMARITAN GUIDE SP S2.pdf FUNCTIONAL WRITING S1.pdf KCSE GRAMMAR REV S1 (2).pdf THE SAMARITAN KCSE ESSAYS S1 (2).pdf CHOZI LA HERI KCSE QNS (2).pdf KCSE INHERITANCE ESSAYS (2).pdf ISIMU JAMII REVISION S1 (2).pdf KCSE CLOZE-TEST REVISION S1 (2).pdf THE SAMARITAN […]

  13. The Biggest Discoveries in Biology in 2023

    Video: During 2023, ... and as new breakthroughs in fundamental biology come to light in the years ahead, we will be there for them too. Share this article. Copied! ... which focuses on perception — co-created and then led experiments aimed at testing which theory's predictions were more accurate. The results may have been a letdown for ...

  14. A-Level Biology Predicted Papers

    2024 papers are out 2nd April Mark Scheme at the end of every paper 📝 Written by experienced teachers and examiners 📝 📋 Exam board-specific content 📋 ♻️ Environmentally sensitive digital delivery ♻️ 🧐 Thoroughly reviewed and checked 🧐 💪 All papers + video walkthroughs = Bootcamps 💪 🎓All papers + video walkthroughs + live tutorials = Masterclasses 🎓 🤑 ...

  15. PDF 231/3 Biology Paper 3 Practical Kcse 2023 Prediction Master Cycle 6

    BIOLOGY PAPER 3 PRACTICAL KCSE 2023 PREDICTION MASTER CYCLE 6 INSTRUCTIONS TO SCHOOLS 1. The information contained in this paper is to enable the head of school and the teacher in charge of Biology to make adequate preparations for this Biology Practical examination. NO ONE ELSE should have access to this paper or acquire knowledge of its contents.

  16. AQA Biology essay predictions

    A-level Biology Study Group 2022-2023; Predicted essay titles Biology aqa; AQA A-Level Psychology Support for 2024 exams; AQA A-level Environmental Science Paper 1 (7447/1) - 20th May 2024 [Exam Chat] A-level Psychology Study Group 2023-2024; biology, chemistry and history alevel combination ? Is OCR or AQA a-level biology better? A-level ...

  17. Biology essay EXAMS 2022-My 3 predictions & plans! # ...

    If you want to know how to write the A level Biology essay, or how to plan the essay, or even which biology essay titles may come up then this video is for y...

  18. Biology Predictions 2024 for Leaving Cert Higher Level

    Updated March 2024. Our Biology predictions based on analysis of past papers appear to have coincided and agreed quite closely with one of the mock exams. They were temporarily hidden - and now they are back. You may also like: Biology Study Plan Biology Notes (€) Predictions 2024 While it is impossible to be certain about […]

  19. AQA A-Level Biology Paper 3 [21st June 2023] Exam Chat

    AQA A-Level Biology Paper 3 | 21st June 2023 [Exam Chat] Welcome to the exam discussion thread for this exam. Introduce yourself! Let others know what you're aiming for in your exams, what you are struggling with in your revision or anything else. Wishing you all the best of luck. General Information Date/Time: 21st June 2023 AM Length: 2h Link to Study Group: A-Level Biology Study Group 2022-2023

  20. AQA A Level Biology Predicted Papers 2024

    Our AQA A Level Biology predicted papers are unique and original, so you will not have seen our questions before on the internet, or in other past papers. ... 2023 . Add your own answer . Ask a question Contact Details. 020 3633 5145 / [email protected] Mon - Thurs: 09:00 - 19:00, Fri: 09:00 - 18:00, Sat 10:00-16:00; Evans Business Centre ...

  21. Studyclix Leaving Cert Predictions 2023

    Studyclix Leaving Cert Predictions 2023. By Megan Thornton - 2 minute read Every year, in the lead-up to state exams, we are often asked for predictions for Leaving cert subjects. So we've put together our Topic Analysis Tables for you to try & plan your study as best as possible! ... Biology Experiments. Business. Chemistry. Chemistry ...

  22. Summer 2024 AQA A Level Biology Predicted Exam

    This is for the following paper: AQA A Level Biology Paper 3 (7402/3) Our predicted paper follows the format of the true AQA A Level Biology Paper 3 closely. It is also the exact duration and mark-count, with questions of increasing difficulty and the obligatory essay question. A mark scheme is also attached.

  23. McKinsey technology trends outlook 2024

    Despite challenging overall market conditions in 2023, continuing investments in frontier technologies promise substantial future growth in enterprise adoption. Generative AI (gen AI) has been a standout trend since 2022, with the extraordinary uptick in interest and investment in this technology unlocking innovative possibilities across interconnected trends such as robotics and immersive ...

  24. AQA Alevel Biology 2023

    AQA Alevel Biology 2023; Watch. 1 year ago. AQA Alevel Biology 2023. MedApplicantttt. 14. do you guys have any predictions? 0 Report. Reply. Scroll to see replies. 1; 2; Next. Reply 1. 1 year ago. ... do you guys have any prediction for the essay question? (edited 1 year ago) 2 Report. Reply. Reply 19. 1 year ago. HashTag556. 9. Original post ...