Logo for VIVA Open Publishing

Want to create or adapt books like this? Learn more about how Pressbooks supports open publishing practices.

Identifying Thesis Statements, Claims, and Evidence

Thesis statements, claims, and evidence, introduction.

The three important parts of an argumentative essay are:

  • A thesis statement is a sentence, usually in the first paragraph of an article, that expresses the article’s main point. It is not a fact; it’s a statement that you could disagree with.  Therefore, the author has to convince you that the statement is correct.
  • Claims are statements that support the thesis statement, but like the thesis statement,  are not facts.  Because a claim is not a fact, it requires supporting evidence.
  • Evidence is factual information that shows a claim is true.  Usually, writers have to conduct their own research to find evidence that supports their ideas.  The evidence may include statistical (numerical) information, the opinions of experts, studies, personal experience, scholarly articles, or reports.

Each paragraph in the article is numbered at the beginning of the first sentence.

Paragraphs 1-7

Identifying the Thesis Statement. Paragraph 2 ends with this thesis statement:  “People’s prior convictions should not be held against them in their pursuit of higher learning.”  It is a thesis statement for three reasons:

  • It is the article’s main argument.
  • It is not a fact. Someone could think that peoples’ prior convictions should affect their access to higher education.
  • It requires evidence to show that it is true.

Finding Claims.  A claim is statement that supports a thesis statement.  Like a thesis, it is not a fact so it needs to be supported by evidence.

You have already identified the article’s thesis statement: “People’s prior convictions should not be held against them in their pursuit of higher learning.”

Like the thesis, a claim be an idea that the author believes to be true, but others may not agree.  For this reason, a claim needs support.

  • Question 1.  Can you find a claim in paragraph 3? Look for a statement that might be true, but needs to be supported by evidence.

Finding Evidence. 

Paragraphs 5-7 offer one type of evidence to support the claim you identified in the last question.  Reread paragraphs 5-7.

  • Question 2.  Which word best describes the kind of evidence included in those paragraphs:  A report, a study, personal experience of the author, statistics, or the opinion of an expert?

Paragraphs 8-10

Finding Claims

Paragraph 8 makes two claims:

  • “The United States needs to have more of this transformative power of education.”
  • “The country [the United States] incarcerates more people and at a higher rate than any other nation in the world.”

Finding Evidence

Paragraphs 8 and 9 include these statistics as evidence:

  • “The U.S. accounts for less than 5 percent of the world population but nearly 25 percent of the incarcerated population around the globe.”
  • “Roughly 2.2 million people in the United States are essentially locked away in cages. About 1 in 5 of those people are locked up for drug offenses.”

Question 3. Does this evidence support claim 1 from paragraph 8 (about the transformative power of education) or claim 2 (about the U.S.’s high incarceration rate)?

Question 4. Which word best describes this kind of evidence:  A report, a study, personal experience of the author, statistics, or the opinion of an expert?

Paragraphs 11-13

Remember that in paragraph 2, Andrisse writes that:

  • “People’s prior convictions should not be held against them in their pursuit of higher learning.” (Thesis statement)
  • “More must be done to remove the various barriers that exist between formerly incarcerated individuals such as myself and higher education.” (Claim)

Now, review paragraphs 11-13 (Early life of crime). In these paragraphs, Andrisse shares more of his personal story.

Question 5. Do you think his personal story is evidence for statement 1 above, statement 2, both, or neither one?

Question 6. Is yes, which one(s)?

Question 7. Do you think his personal story is good evidence?  Does it persuade you to agree with him?

Paragraphs 14-16

Listed below are some claims that Andrisse makes in paragraph 14.  Below each claim, please write the supporting evidence from paragraphs 15 and 16.  If you can’t find any evidence,  write “none.”

Claim:  The more education a person has, the higher their income.

Claim: Similarly, the more education a person has, the less likely they are to return to prison.

Paragraphs 17-19

Evaluating Evidence

In these paragraphs, Andrisse returns to his personal story. He explains how his father’s illness inspired him to become a doctor and shares that he was accepted to only one of six biomedical graduate programs.

Do you think that this part of Andrisse’s story serves as evidence (support) for any claims that you’ve identified so far?   Or does it support his general thesis that “people’s prior convictions should not be held against them in pursuit of higher learning?” Please explain your answer.

Paragraphs 20-23

Andrisse uses his personal experience to repeat a claim he makes in paragraph 3, that “more must be done to remove the various barriers that exist between formerly incarcerated individuals such as myself and higher education.”

To support this statement, he has to show that barriers exist.  One barrier he identifies is the cost of college. He then explains the advantages of offering Pell grants to incarcerated people.

What evidence in paragraphs 21-23 support his claim about the success of Pell grants?

Paragraphs  24-28 (Remove questions about drug crimes from federal aid forms)

In this section, Andrisse argues that federal aid forms should not ask students about prior drug convictions.  To support that claim, he includes a statistic about students who had to answer a similar question on their college application.

What statistic does he include?

In paragraph 25, he assumes that if a question about drug convictions discourages students from applying to college, it will probably also discourage them from applying for federal aid.

What do you think about this assumption?   Do you think it’s reasonable or do you think Andrisse needs stronger evidence to show that federal aid forms should not ask students about prior drug convictions?

Supporting English Language Learners in First-Year College Composition Copyright © by Breana Bayraktar is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

Share This Book

The Writing Center • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Thesis Statements

What this handout is about.

This handout describes what a thesis statement is, how thesis statements work in your writing, and how you can craft or refine one for your draft.

Introduction

Writing in college often takes the form of persuasion—convincing others that you have an interesting, logical point of view on the subject you are studying. Persuasion is a skill you practice regularly in your daily life. You persuade your roommate to clean up, your parents to let you borrow the car, your friend to vote for your favorite candidate or policy. In college, course assignments often ask you to make a persuasive case in writing. You are asked to convince your reader of your point of view. This form of persuasion, often called academic argument, follows a predictable pattern in writing. After a brief introduction of your topic, you state your point of view on the topic directly and often in one sentence. This sentence is the thesis statement, and it serves as a summary of the argument you’ll make in the rest of your paper.

What is a thesis statement?

A thesis statement:

  • tells the reader how you will interpret the significance of the subject matter under discussion.
  • is a road map for the paper; in other words, it tells the reader what to expect from the rest of the paper.
  • directly answers the question asked of you. A thesis is an interpretation of a question or subject, not the subject itself. The subject, or topic, of an essay might be World War II or Moby Dick; a thesis must then offer a way to understand the war or the novel.
  • makes a claim that others might dispute.
  • is usually a single sentence near the beginning of your paper (most often, at the end of the first paragraph) that presents your argument to the reader. The rest of the paper, the body of the essay, gathers and organizes evidence that will persuade the reader of the logic of your interpretation.

If your assignment asks you to take a position or develop a claim about a subject, you may need to convey that position or claim in a thesis statement near the beginning of your draft. The assignment may not explicitly state that you need a thesis statement because your instructor may assume you will include one. When in doubt, ask your instructor if the assignment requires a thesis statement. When an assignment asks you to analyze, to interpret, to compare and contrast, to demonstrate cause and effect, or to take a stand on an issue, it is likely that you are being asked to develop a thesis and to support it persuasively. (Check out our handout on understanding assignments for more information.)

How do I create a thesis?

A thesis is the result of a lengthy thinking process. Formulating a thesis is not the first thing you do after reading an essay assignment. Before you develop an argument on any topic, you have to collect and organize evidence, look for possible relationships between known facts (such as surprising contrasts or similarities), and think about the significance of these relationships. Once you do this thinking, you will probably have a “working thesis” that presents a basic or main idea and an argument that you think you can support with evidence. Both the argument and your thesis are likely to need adjustment along the way.

Writers use all kinds of techniques to stimulate their thinking and to help them clarify relationships or comprehend the broader significance of a topic and arrive at a thesis statement. For more ideas on how to get started, see our handout on brainstorming .

How do I know if my thesis is strong?

If there’s time, run it by your instructor or make an appointment at the Writing Center to get some feedback. Even if you do not have time to get advice elsewhere, you can do some thesis evaluation of your own. When reviewing your first draft and its working thesis, ask yourself the following :

  • Do I answer the question? Re-reading the question prompt after constructing a working thesis can help you fix an argument that misses the focus of the question. If the prompt isn’t phrased as a question, try to rephrase it. For example, “Discuss the effect of X on Y” can be rephrased as “What is the effect of X on Y?”
  • Have I taken a position that others might challenge or oppose? If your thesis simply states facts that no one would, or even could, disagree with, it’s possible that you are simply providing a summary, rather than making an argument.
  • Is my thesis statement specific enough? Thesis statements that are too vague often do not have a strong argument. If your thesis contains words like “good” or “successful,” see if you could be more specific: why is something “good”; what specifically makes something “successful”?
  • Does my thesis pass the “So what?” test? If a reader’s first response is likely to  be “So what?” then you need to clarify, to forge a relationship, or to connect to a larger issue.
  • Does my essay support my thesis specifically and without wandering? If your thesis and the body of your essay do not seem to go together, one of them has to change. It’s okay to change your working thesis to reflect things you have figured out in the course of writing your paper. Remember, always reassess and revise your writing as necessary.
  • Does my thesis pass the “how and why?” test? If a reader’s first response is “how?” or “why?” your thesis may be too open-ended and lack guidance for the reader. See what you can add to give the reader a better take on your position right from the beginning.

Suppose you are taking a course on contemporary communication, and the instructor hands out the following essay assignment: “Discuss the impact of social media on public awareness.” Looking back at your notes, you might start with this working thesis:

Social media impacts public awareness in both positive and negative ways.

You can use the questions above to help you revise this general statement into a stronger thesis.

  • Do I answer the question? You can analyze this if you rephrase “discuss the impact” as “what is the impact?” This way, you can see that you’ve answered the question only very generally with the vague “positive and negative ways.”
  • Have I taken a position that others might challenge or oppose? Not likely. Only people who maintain that social media has a solely positive or solely negative impact could disagree.
  • Is my thesis statement specific enough? No. What are the positive effects? What are the negative effects?
  • Does my thesis pass the “how and why?” test? No. Why are they positive? How are they positive? What are their causes? Why are they negative? How are they negative? What are their causes?
  • Does my thesis pass the “So what?” test? No. Why should anyone care about the positive and/or negative impact of social media?

After thinking about your answers to these questions, you decide to focus on the one impact you feel strongly about and have strong evidence for:

Because not every voice on social media is reliable, people have become much more critical consumers of information, and thus, more informed voters.

This version is a much stronger thesis! It answers the question, takes a specific position that others can challenge, and it gives a sense of why it matters.

Let’s try another. Suppose your literature professor hands out the following assignment in a class on the American novel: Write an analysis of some aspect of Mark Twain’s novel Huckleberry Finn. “This will be easy,” you think. “I loved Huckleberry Finn!” You grab a pad of paper and write:

Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn is a great American novel.

You begin to analyze your thesis:

  • Do I answer the question? No. The prompt asks you to analyze some aspect of the novel. Your working thesis is a statement of general appreciation for the entire novel.

Think about aspects of the novel that are important to its structure or meaning—for example, the role of storytelling, the contrasting scenes between the shore and the river, or the relationships between adults and children. Now you write:

In Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain develops a contrast between life on the river and life on the shore.
  • Do I answer the question? Yes!
  • Have I taken a position that others might challenge or oppose? Not really. This contrast is well-known and accepted.
  • Is my thesis statement specific enough? It’s getting there–you have highlighted an important aspect of the novel for investigation. However, it’s still not clear what your analysis will reveal.
  • Does my thesis pass the “how and why?” test? Not yet. Compare scenes from the book and see what you discover. Free write, make lists, jot down Huck’s actions and reactions and anything else that seems interesting.
  • Does my thesis pass the “So what?” test? What’s the point of this contrast? What does it signify?”

After examining the evidence and considering your own insights, you write:

Through its contrasting river and shore scenes, Twain’s Huckleberry Finn suggests that to find the true expression of American democratic ideals, one must leave “civilized” society and go back to nature.

This final thesis statement presents an interpretation of a literary work based on an analysis of its content. Of course, for the essay itself to be successful, you must now present evidence from the novel that will convince the reader of your interpretation.

Works consulted

We consulted these works while writing this handout. This is not a comprehensive list of resources on the handout’s topic, and we encourage you to do your own research to find additional publications. Please do not use this list as a model for the format of your own reference list, as it may not match the citation style you are using. For guidance on formatting citations, please see the UNC Libraries citation tutorial . We revise these tips periodically and welcome feedback.

Anson, Chris M., and Robert A. Schwegler. 2010. The Longman Handbook for Writers and Readers , 6th ed. New York: Longman.

Lunsford, Andrea A. 2015. The St. Martin’s Handbook , 8th ed. Boston: Bedford/St Martin’s.

Ramage, John D., John C. Bean, and June Johnson. 2018. The Allyn & Bacon Guide to Writing , 8th ed. New York: Pearson.

Ruszkiewicz, John J., Christy Friend, Daniel Seward, and Maxine Hairston. 2010. The Scott, Foresman Handbook for Writers , 9th ed. Boston: Pearson Education.

You may reproduce it for non-commercial use if you use the entire handout and attribute the source: The Writing Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Make a Gift

Library homepage

  • school Campus Bookshelves
  • menu_book Bookshelves
  • perm_media Learning Objects
  • login Login
  • how_to_reg Request Instructor Account
  • hub Instructor Commons
  • Download Page (PDF)
  • Download Full Book (PDF)
  • Periodic Table
  • Physics Constants
  • Scientific Calculator
  • Reference & Cite
  • Tools expand_more
  • Readability

selected template will load here

This action is not available.

Humanities LibreTexts

5.2: Identifying Thesis Statements and Topic Sentences

  • Last updated
  • Save as PDF
  • Page ID 25748

Being able to identify the purpose and thesis of a text, as you’re reading it, takes practice. This section will offer you that practice.

One fun strategy for developing a deeper understanding the material you’re reading is to make a visual “map” of the ideas. Mind maps, whether hand-drawn or done through computer programs, can be fun to make, and help put all the ideas of an essay you’re reading in one easy-to-read format.

Your understanding of what the “central” element of the mind map is might change as you read and re-read. Developing the central idea of your mind map is a great way to help you determine the reading’s thesis.

The center is a yellow star-shaped human form, labeled Dave. Primary lines leading away from it include "free," "Aranya," and "Anger." Color-coded lines lead to phrases that are difficult to see clearly.

Figure 2.5. 1

- Hand-drawn Mind Map

Locating Explicit and Implicit Thesis Statements

In academic writing, the thesis is often explicit : it is included as a sentence as part of the text. It might be near the beginning of the work, but not always–some types of academic writing leave the thesis until the conclusion.

Journalism and reporting also rely on explicit thesis statements that appear very early in the piece–the first paragraph or even the first sentence.

Works of literature, on the other hand, usually do not contain a specific sentence that sums up the core concept of the writing. However, readers should finish the piece with a good understanding of what the work was trying to convey. This is what’s called an implicit thesis statement: the primary point of the reading is conveyed indirectly, in multiple locations throughout the work. (In literature, this is also referred to as the theme of the work.)

Academic writing sometimes relies on implicit thesis statements, as well.

This video offers excellent guidance in identifying the thesis statement of a work, no matter if it’s explicit or implicit.

Topic Sentences

We’ve learned that a thesis statement conveys the primary message of an entire piece of text. Now, let’s look at the next level of important sentences in a piece of text: topic sentences in each paragraph.

A useful metaphor would be to think of the thesis statement of a text as a general: it controls all the major decisions of the writing. There is only one thesis statement in a text. Topic sentences, in this relationship, serve as captains: they organize and sub-divide the overall goals of a writing into individual components. Each paragraph will have a topic sentence.

Graphic labeled Parts of a Paragraph. It shows a hamburger separated into different layers. From the top down, they are labeled "topic sentence (top bun)"; "supporting details (tomatoes, lettuce, and meat)"; "colourful vocabulary (mustard, ketchup, and relish)"; "concluding sentence (bottom bun)."

Figure 2.5. 2

It might be helpful to think of a topic sentence as working in two directions simultaneously. It relates the paragraph to the essay’s thesis, and thereby acts as a signpost for the argument of the paper as a whole, but it also defines the scope of the paragraph itself. For example, consider the following topic sentence:

Many characters in Lorraine Hansberry’s play A Raisin in the Sun have one particular dream in which they are following, though the character Walter pursues his most aggressively.

If this sentence controls the paragraph that follows, then all sentences in the paragraph must relate in some way to Walter and the pursuit of his dream.

Topic sentences often act like tiny thesis statements. Like a thesis statement, a topic sentence makes a claim of some sort. As the thesis statement is the unifying force in the essay, so the topic sentence must be the unifying force in the paragraph. Further, as is the case with the thesis statement, when the topic sentence makes a claim, the paragraph which follows must expand, describe, or prove it in some way. Topic sentences make a point and give reasons or examples to support it.

 The following diagram illustrates how a topic sentence can provide more focus to the general topic at hand.

Placement of Topic Sentences

What if I told you that the topic sentence doesn’t necessarily need to be at the beginning? This might be contrary to what you’ve learned in previous English or writing classes, and that’s okay. Certainly, when authors announce a topic clearly and early on in a paragraph, their readers are likely to grasp their idea and to make the connections that they want them to make.

However, when authors are writing for a more sophisticated academic audience—that is an audience of college-educated readers—they will often use more sophisticated organizational strategies to build and reveal ideas in their writing. One way to think about a topic sentence, is that it presents the broadest view of what authors want their readers to understand. This is to say that they’re providing a broad statement that either announces or brings into focus the purpose or the meaning for the details of the paragraph. If the topic sentence is seen as the broadest view, then every supporting detail will bring a narrower—or more specific—view of the same topic.

With this in mind, take some time to contemplate the diagrams in the figure below. The widest point of each diagram (the bases of the triangles) represents the topic sentence of the paragraph. As details are presented, the topic becomes narrower and more focused. The topic can precede the details, it can follow them, it can both precede and follow them, or the details can surround the topic. There are surely more alternatives than those that are presented here, but this gives you an idea of some of the possible paragraph structures and possible placements for the topic sentence of a paragraph.

Consider some of the following examples of different topic sentence placements in a paragraph from a review essay of the beloved children’s book, The Cat in the Hat , by Dr. Seuss. Paragraph structures are labeled according to the diagrams presented above, and topic sentences are identified by red text.

Topic Sentence-Details-Topic Sentence

A good children’s book requires an exciting plot and a problem with which children can sympathize. In The Cat in the Hat there is plenty of action, depicted in the wild antics of the cat, and later in the amazing but dangerous and messy tricks of Thing 1 and Thing 2. All this excitement and action naturally draws children into the story and keeps the plot moving forward at a pace that maintains their interest. There is also tension to be resolved. The fish senses danger and constantly warns the children not to participate in the cat’s perilous stunts. And later, as the mother’s return becomes more imminent, the children begin to heed the fish’s warning and finally wish to contain the chaos and clean up the mess, but how? While this plot is fantastic enough to fuel any child’s imagination, it also contains a problem with which any child can relate: a mess and the threat of a parent’s disapproval. The careful balance of action, tension, and relatability is what makes this book an enduring childhood favorite.

Topic Sentence-Details

The careful balance of action, tension, and relatability is what makes Dr. Seuss’s The Cat in the Hat an enduring childhood favorite. In The Cat in the Hat there is plenty of action, depicted in the wild antics of the cat, and later in the amazing but dangerous and messy tricks of Thing 1 and Thing 2. All this excitement and action naturally draws children into the story and keeps the plot moving forward at a pace that maintains their interest. There is also tension to be resolved. The fish senses danger and constantly warns the children not to participate in the cat’s perilous stunts. And later, as the mother’s return becomes more imminent, the children begin to heed the fish’s warning and finally wish to contain the chaos and clean up the mess, but how? While this plot is fantastic enough to fuel any child’s imagination, it also contains a problem with which any child can relate: a mess and the threat of a parent’s disapproval.

You can relocate the topic sentence to the end here, and you’ll have an example of the Details-Topic Sentence method of organizing the paragraph.

Details-Topic Sentence-Details

In The Cat in the Hat there is plenty of action, depicted in the wild antics of the cat, and later in the amazing but dangerous and messy tricks of Thing 1 and Thing 2. All this excitement and action naturally draws children into the story and keeps the plot moving forward at a pace that maintains their interest. The careful balance of action, tension, and relatability is what makes Dr. Seuss’s The Cat in the Hat an enduring childhood favorite. There is definitely tension to be resolved here. The fish senses danger and constantly warns the children not to participate in the cat’s perilous stunts. And later, as the mother’s return becomes more imminent, the children begin to heed the fish’s warning and finally wish to contain the chaos and clean up the mess, but how? While this plot is fantastic enough to fuel any child’s imagination, it also contains a problem with which any child can relate: a mess and the threat of a parent’s disapproval.

Explicit and Implicit Topic Sentences

Similar to thesis statements, topic sentences may be explicit or implicit.

Consider the following paragraph from an essay titled “The Bothersome Beauty of Pigeons,” by author and Boise State writing professor, Bruce Ballenger. It’s important to note that this is a personal narrative essay rather than a more traditional academic essay, but the paragraph provides a good example of an implied topic. In this essay Ballenger takes the time to consider the beauty of pigeons, a bird that’s usually thought of as nothing more than a nuisance. Just prior to this paragraph, Ballenger talks about how he used a fake owl to scare away pigeons on his property. He goes on to explain,

My pigeons moved next door where an elderly couple feed them bird seed and have the time and willingness to clean up after their new charges; so it seems, in this case, things have worked out for everyone. But the large flocks still haunt the piazzas in Florence and Venice, the squares in London, and similar places in nearly every city across the globe. Despite their ability to distinguish between a Van Gogh and a Chagall, pigeons still deposit droppings that deface the great marble statues and facades–the works of art and architecture that are part of our human heritage–and yet people still buy bags of seed for about a dollar and pose for photographs, drenched in doves. Meanwhile, officials in these cities continue, sometimes quietly, to wage war against the birds (“Introduction”).

Here, Ballenger seems to be saying that in spite of the attempts of so many to rid themselves of the pigeons, others are still drawn to them and will feed them and encourage them to come back. His main idea seems to be that the battle against pigeons is a losing proposition, but he doesn’t come out and say so. His message in this paragraph is implied. Do you think this paragraph would be improved with an explicit topic sentence?

EXERCISE 1: Identify the Topic and Focus

Choose a piece of writing, perhaps an essay or some news articles found online, and for each paragraph identify (1) the topic and (2) the more focused idea. Remember, the topic sentence applies more focus to the broader topic to help narrow the scope of the paragraph. For example, the topic of a paragraph might be school lunches. The more focused idea of that same paragraph might be the idea of having students plant school gardens as a way to help incorporate more fresh produce in the menu.

License and Attributions:

CC licensed content, Previously shared:

Basic Reading and Writing. Authored by: Lumen. Located at:  https://human.libretexts.org/Bookshelves/Composition/Book:_Basic_Reading_and_Writing_(Lumen)/ Module_2:_Critical_Reading/2.05:_Identifying_Thesis_Statements   License: CC BY: Attribution.

Adaptions: Reformatted, some content removed to fit a broader audience.

Writing Center Home Page

OASIS: Writing Center

Writing a paper: thesis statements, basics of thesis statements.

The thesis statement is the brief articulation of your paper's central argument and purpose. You might hear it referred to as simply a "thesis." Every scholarly paper should have a thesis statement, and strong thesis statements are concise, specific, and arguable. Concise means the thesis is short: perhaps one or two sentences for a shorter paper. Specific means the thesis deals with a narrow and focused topic, appropriate to the paper's length. Arguable means that a scholar in your field could disagree (or perhaps already has!).

Strong thesis statements address specific intellectual questions, have clear positions, and use a structure that reflects the overall structure of the paper. Read on to learn more about constructing a strong thesis statement.

Being Specific

This thesis statement has no specific argument:

Needs Improvement: In this essay, I will examine two scholarly articles to find similarities and differences.

This statement is concise, but it is neither specific nor arguable—a reader might wonder, "Which scholarly articles? What is the topic of this paper? What field is the author writing in?" Additionally, the purpose of the paper—to "examine…to find similarities and differences" is not of a scholarly level. Identifying similarities and differences is a good first step, but strong academic argument goes further, analyzing what those similarities and differences might mean or imply.

Better: In this essay, I will argue that Bowler's (2003) autocratic management style, when coupled with Smith's (2007) theory of social cognition, can reduce the expenses associated with employee turnover.

The new revision here is still concise, as well as specific and arguable.  We can see that it is specific because the writer is mentioning (a) concrete ideas and (b) exact authors.  We can also gather the field (business) and the topic (management and employee turnover). The statement is arguable because the student goes beyond merely comparing; he or she draws conclusions from that comparison ("can reduce the expenses associated with employee turnover").

Making a Unique Argument

This thesis draft repeats the language of the writing prompt without making a unique argument:

Needs Improvement: The purpose of this essay is to monitor, assess, and evaluate an educational program for its strengths and weaknesses. Then, I will provide suggestions for improvement.

You can see here that the student has simply stated the paper's assignment, without articulating specifically how he or she will address it. The student can correct this error simply by phrasing the thesis statement as a specific answer to the assignment prompt.

Better: Through a series of student interviews, I found that Kennedy High School's antibullying program was ineffective. In order to address issues of conflict between students, I argue that Kennedy High School should embrace policies outlined by the California Department of Education (2010).

Words like "ineffective" and "argue" show here that the student has clearly thought through the assignment and analyzed the material; he or she is putting forth a specific and debatable position. The concrete information ("student interviews," "antibullying") further prepares the reader for the body of the paper and demonstrates how the student has addressed the assignment prompt without just restating that language.

Creating a Debate

This thesis statement includes only obvious fact or plot summary instead of argument:

Needs Improvement: Leadership is an important quality in nurse educators.

A good strategy to determine if your thesis statement is too broad (and therefore, not arguable) is to ask yourself, "Would a scholar in my field disagree with this point?" Here, we can see easily that no scholar is likely to argue that leadership is an unimportant quality in nurse educators.  The student needs to come up with a more arguable claim, and probably a narrower one; remember that a short paper needs a more focused topic than a dissertation.

Better: Roderick's (2009) theory of participatory leadership  is particularly appropriate to nurse educators working within the emergency medicine field, where students benefit most from collegial and kinesthetic learning.

Here, the student has identified a particular type of leadership ("participatory leadership"), narrowing the topic, and has made an arguable claim (this type of leadership is "appropriate" to a specific type of nurse educator). Conceivably, a scholar in the nursing field might disagree with this approach. The student's paper can now proceed, providing specific pieces of evidence to support the arguable central claim.

Choosing the Right Words

This thesis statement uses large or scholarly-sounding words that have no real substance:

Needs Improvement: Scholars should work to seize metacognitive outcomes by harnessing discipline-based networks to empower collaborative infrastructures.

There are many words in this sentence that may be buzzwords in the student's field or key terms taken from other texts, but together they do not communicate a clear, specific meaning. Sometimes students think scholarly writing means constructing complex sentences using special language, but actually it's usually a stronger choice to write clear, simple sentences. When in doubt, remember that your ideas should be complex, not your sentence structure.

Better: Ecologists should work to educate the U.S. public on conservation methods by making use of local and national green organizations to create a widespread communication plan.

Notice in the revision that the field is now clear (ecology), and the language has been made much more field-specific ("conservation methods," "green organizations"), so the reader is able to see concretely the ideas the student is communicating.

Leaving Room for Discussion

This thesis statement is not capable of development or advancement in the paper:

Needs Improvement: There are always alternatives to illegal drug use.

This sample thesis statement makes a claim, but it is not a claim that will sustain extended discussion. This claim is the type of claim that might be appropriate for the conclusion of a paper, but in the beginning of the paper, the student is left with nowhere to go. What further points can be made? If there are "always alternatives" to the problem the student is identifying, then why bother developing a paper around that claim? Ideally, a thesis statement should be complex enough to explore over the length of the entire paper.

Better: The most effective treatment plan for methamphetamine addiction may be a combination of pharmacological and cognitive therapy, as argued by Baker (2008), Smith (2009), and Xavier (2011).

In the revised thesis, you can see the student make a specific, debatable claim that has the potential to generate several pages' worth of discussion. When drafting a thesis statement, think about the questions your thesis statement will generate: What follow-up inquiries might a reader have? In the first example, there are almost no additional questions implied, but the revised example allows for a good deal more exploration.

Thesis Mad Libs

If you are having trouble getting started, try using the models below to generate a rough model of a thesis statement! These models are intended for drafting purposes only and should not appear in your final work.

  • In this essay, I argue ____, using ______ to assert _____.
  • While scholars have often argued ______, I argue______, because_______.
  • Through an analysis of ______, I argue ______, which is important because_______.

Words to Avoid and to Embrace

When drafting your thesis statement, avoid words like explore, investigate, learn, compile, summarize , and explain to describe the main purpose of your paper. These words imply a paper that summarizes or "reports," rather than synthesizing and analyzing.

Instead of the terms above, try words like argue, critique, question , and interrogate . These more analytical words may help you begin strongly, by articulating a specific, critical, scholarly position.

Read Kayla's blog post for tips on taking a stand in a well-crafted thesis statement.

Related Resources

Webinar

Didn't find what you need? Search our website or email us .

Read our website accessibility and accommodation statement .

  • Previous Page: Introductions
  • Next Page: Conclusions
  • Office of Student Disability Services

Walden Resources

Departments.

  • Academic Residencies
  • Academic Skills
  • Career Planning and Development
  • Customer Care Team
  • Field Experience
  • Military Services
  • Student Success Advising
  • Writing Skills

Centers and Offices

  • Center for Social Change
  • Office of Academic Support and Instructional Services
  • Office of Degree Acceleration
  • Office of Research and Doctoral Services
  • Office of Student Affairs

Student Resources

  • Doctoral Writing Assessment
  • Form & Style Review
  • Quick Answers
  • ScholarWorks
  • SKIL Courses and Workshops
  • Walden Bookstore
  • Walden Catalog & Student Handbook
  • Student Safety/Title IX
  • Legal & Consumer Information
  • Website Terms and Conditions
  • Cookie Policy
  • Accessibility
  • Accreditation
  • State Authorization
  • Net Price Calculator
  • Contact Walden

Walden University is a member of Adtalem Global Education, Inc. www.adtalem.com Walden University is certified to operate by SCHEV © 2024 Walden University LLC. All rights reserved.

Reference management. Clean and simple.

How to write a thesis statement + examples

Thesis statement

What is a thesis statement?

Is a thesis statement a question, how do you write a good thesis statement, how do i know if my thesis statement is good, examples of thesis statements, helpful resources on how to write a thesis statement, frequently asked questions about writing a thesis statement, related articles.

A thesis statement is the main argument of your paper or thesis.

The thesis statement is one of the most important elements of any piece of academic writing . It is a brief statement of your paper’s main argument. Essentially, you are stating what you will be writing about.

You can see your thesis statement as an answer to a question. While it also contains the question, it should really give an answer to the question with new information and not just restate or reiterate it.

Your thesis statement is part of your introduction. Learn more about how to write a good thesis introduction in our introduction guide .

A thesis statement is not a question. A statement must be arguable and provable through evidence and analysis. While your thesis might stem from a research question, it should be in the form of a statement.

Tip: A thesis statement is typically 1-2 sentences. For a longer project like a thesis, the statement may be several sentences or a paragraph.

A good thesis statement needs to do the following:

  • Condense the main idea of your thesis into one or two sentences.
  • Answer your project’s main research question.
  • Clearly state your position in relation to the topic .
  • Make an argument that requires support or evidence.

Once you have written down a thesis statement, check if it fulfills the following criteria:

  • Your statement needs to be provable by evidence. As an argument, a thesis statement needs to be debatable.
  • Your statement needs to be precise. Do not give away too much information in the thesis statement and do not load it with unnecessary information.
  • Your statement cannot say that one solution is simply right or simply wrong as a matter of fact. You should draw upon verified facts to persuade the reader of your solution, but you cannot just declare something as right or wrong.

As previously mentioned, your thesis statement should answer a question.

If the question is:

What do you think the City of New York should do to reduce traffic congestion?

A good thesis statement restates the question and answers it:

In this paper, I will argue that the City of New York should focus on providing exclusive lanes for public transport and adaptive traffic signals to reduce traffic congestion by the year 2035.

Here is another example. If the question is:

How can we end poverty?

A good thesis statement should give more than one solution to the problem in question:

In this paper, I will argue that introducing universal basic income can help reduce poverty and positively impact the way we work.

  • The Writing Center of the University of North Carolina has a list of questions to ask to see if your thesis is strong .

A thesis statement is part of the introduction of your paper. It is usually found in the first or second paragraph to let the reader know your research purpose from the beginning.

In general, a thesis statement should have one or two sentences. But the length really depends on the overall length of your project. Take a look at our guide about the length of thesis statements for more insight on this topic.

Here is a list of Thesis Statement Examples that will help you understand better how to write them.

Every good essay should include a thesis statement as part of its introduction, no matter the academic level. Of course, if you are a high school student you are not expected to have the same type of thesis as a PhD student.

Here is a great YouTube tutorial showing How To Write An Essay: Thesis Statements .

how to find a thesis statement in a newspaper article

Enago Academy

What Makes a Thesis Statement Spectacular? — 5 things to know

' src=

Table of Contents

What Is a Thesis Statement?

A thesis statement is a declarative sentence that states the primary idea of an essay or a research paper . In this statement, the authors declare their beliefs or what they intend to argue in their research study. The statement is clear and concise, with only one or two sentences.

Thesis Statement — An Essential in Thesis Writing

A thesis statement distills the research paper idea into one or two sentences. This summary organizes your paper and develops the research argument or opinion. The statement is important because it lets the reader know what the research paper will talk about and how the author is approaching the issue. Moreover, the statement also serves as a map for the paper and helps the authors to track and organize their thoughts more efficiently.

A thesis statement can keep the writer from getting lost in a convoluted and directionless argument. Finally, it will also ensure that the research paper remains relevant and focused on the objective.

Where to Include the Thesis Statement?

The thesis statement is typically placed at the end of the introduction section of your essay or research paper. It usually consists of a single sentence of the writer’s opinion on the topic and provides a specific guide to the readers throughout the paper.

6 Steps to Write an Impactful Thesis Statement

Step 1 – analyze the literature.

Identify the knowledge gaps in the relevant research paper. Analyze the deeper implications of the author’s research argument. Was the research objective mentioned in the thesis statement reversed later in the discussion or conclusion? Does the author contradict themselves? Is there a major knowledge gap in creating a relevant research objective? Has the author understood and validated the fundamental theories correctly? Does the author support an argument without having supporting literature to cite? Answering these or related questions will help authors develop a working thesis and give their thesis an easy direction and structure.

Step 2 – Start with a Question

While developing a working thesis, early in the writing process, you might already have a research question to address. Strong research questions guide the design of studies and define and identify specific objectives. These objectives will assist the author in framing the thesis statement.

Step 3 – Develop the Answer

After initial research, the author could formulate a tentative answer to the research question. At this stage, the answer could be simple enough to guide the research and the writing process. After writing the initial answer, the author could elaborate further on why this is the chosen answer. After reading more about the research topic, the author could write and refine the answers to address the research question.

Step 4 – Write the First Draft of the Thesis Statement

After ideating the working thesis statement, make sure to write it down. It is disheartening to create a great idea for a thesis and then forget it when you lose concentration. The first draft will help you think clearly and logically. It will provide you with an option to align your thesis statement with the defined research objectives.

Step 5 – Anticipate Counter Arguments Against the Statement

After developing a working thesis, you should think about what might be said against it. This list of arguments will help you refute the thesis later. Remember that every argument has a counterargument, and if yours does not have one, what you state is not an argument — it may be a fact or opinion, but not an argument.

Step 6 – Refine the Statement

Anticipating counterarguments will help you refine your statement further. A strong thesis statement should address —

  • Why does your research hold this stand?
  • What will readers learn from the essay?
  • Are the key points of your argumentative or narrative?
  • Does the final thesis statement summarize your overall argument or the entire topic you aim to explain in the research paper?

how to find a thesis statement in a newspaper article

5 Tips to Create a Compelling Thesis Statement

A thesis statement is a crucial part of any academic paper. Clearly stating the main idea of your research helps you focus on the objectives of your paper. Refer to the following tips while drafting your statement:

1. Keep it Concise

The statement should be short and precise. It should contain no more than a couple of sentences.

2. Make it Specific

The statement should be focused on a specific topic or argument. Covering too many topics will only make your paper weaker.

3. Express an Opinion

The statement should have an opinion on an issue or controversy. This will make your paper arguable and interesting to read.

4. Be Assertive

The statement should be stated assertively and not hesitantly or apologetically. Remember, you are making an argument — you need to sound convincing!

5. Support with Evidence

The thesis should be supported with evidence from your paper. Make sure you include specific examples from your research to reinforce your objectives.

Thesis Statement Examples *

Example 1 – alcohol consumption.

High levels of alcohol consumption have harmful effects on your health, such as weight gain, heart disease, and liver complications.

This thesis statement states specific reasons why alcohol consumption is detrimental. It is not required to mention every single detriment in your thesis.

Example 2 – Benefits of the Internet

The internet serves as a means of expediently connecting people across the globe, fostering new friendships and an exchange of ideas that would not have occurred before its inception.

While the internet offers a host of benefits, this thesis statement is about choosing the ability that fosters new friendships and exchange ideas. Also, the research needs to prove how connecting people across the globe could not have happened before the internet’s inception — which is a focused research statement.

*The following thesis statements are not fully researched and are merely examples shown to understand how to write a thesis statement. Also, you should avoid using these statements for your own research paper purposes.

A gripping thesis statement is developed by understanding it from the reader’s point of view. Be aware of not developing topics that only interest you and have less reader attraction. A harsh yet necessary question to ask oneself is — Why should readers read my paper? Is this paper worth reading? Would I read this paper if I weren’t its author?

A thesis statement hypes your research paper. It makes the readers excited about what specific information is coming their way. This helps them learn new facts and possibly embrace new opinions.

Writing a thesis statement (although two sentences) could be a daunting task. Hope this blog helps you write a compelling one! Do consider using the steps to create your thesis statement and tell us about it in the comment section below.

' src=

Great in impactation of knowledge

Rate this article Cancel Reply

Your email address will not be published.

how to find a thesis statement in a newspaper article

Enago Academy's Most Popular

ResearchSummary

  • Promoting Research

Plain Language Summary — Communicating your research to bridge the academic-lay gap

Science can be complex, but does that mean it should not be accessible to the…

Journals Combat Image Manipulation with AI

  • Industry News

Science under Surveillance: Journals adopt advanced AI to uncover image manipulation

Journals are increasingly turning to cutting-edge AI tools to uncover deceitful images published in manuscripts.…

Content Analysis vs Thematic Analysis: What's the difference?

  • Reporting Research

Choosing the Right Analytical Approach: Thematic analysis vs. content analysis for data interpretation

In research, choosing the right approach to understand data is crucial for deriving meaningful insights.…

Diverse Opinion in STM

  • Expert Interviews

Diverse Voices, Inclusive Publishing – Author perspectives on equitable research and entrepreneurship ecosystem

In our steadfast dedication to championing Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI), we engaged in an…

Cross-sectional and Longitudinal Study Design

Comparing Cross Sectional and Longitudinal Studies: 5 steps for choosing the right approach

The process of choosing the right research design can put ourselves at the crossroads of…

Choosing the Right Analytical Approach: Thematic analysis vs. content analysis for…

Comparing Cross Sectional and Longitudinal Studies: 5 steps for choosing the right…

Research Recommendations – Guiding policy-makers for evidence-based decision making

Demystifying the Role of Confounding Variables in Research

how to find a thesis statement in a newspaper article

Sign-up to read more

Subscribe for free to get unrestricted access to all our resources on research writing and academic publishing including:

  • 2000+ blog articles
  • 50+ Webinars
  • 10+ Expert podcasts
  • 50+ Infographics
  • 10+ Checklists
  • Research Guides

We hate spam too. We promise to protect your privacy and never spam you.

I am looking for Editing/ Proofreading services for my manuscript Tentative date of next journal submission:

how to find a thesis statement in a newspaper article

When should AI tools be used in university labs?

Purdue Online Writing Lab Purdue OWL® College of Liberal Arts

Developing Strong Thesis Statements

OWL logo

Welcome to the Purdue OWL

This page is brought to you by the OWL at Purdue University. When printing this page, you must include the entire legal notice.

Copyright ©1995-2018 by The Writing Lab & The OWL at Purdue and Purdue University. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, reproduced, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our terms and conditions of fair use.

These OWL resources will help you develop and refine the arguments in your writing.

The thesis statement or main claim must be debatable

An argumentative or persuasive piece of writing must begin with a debatable thesis or claim. In other words, the thesis must be something that people could reasonably have differing opinions on. If your thesis is something that is generally agreed upon or accepted as fact then there is no reason to try to persuade people.

Example of a non-debatable thesis statement:

This thesis statement is not debatable. First, the word pollution implies that something is bad or negative in some way. Furthermore, all studies agree that pollution is a problem; they simply disagree on the impact it will have or the scope of the problem. No one could reasonably argue that pollution is unambiguously good.

Example of a debatable thesis statement:

This is an example of a debatable thesis because reasonable people could disagree with it. Some people might think that this is how we should spend the nation's money. Others might feel that we should be spending more money on education. Still others could argue that corporations, not the government, should be paying to limit pollution.

Another example of a debatable thesis statement:

In this example there is also room for disagreement between rational individuals. Some citizens might think focusing on recycling programs rather than private automobiles is the most effective strategy.

The thesis needs to be narrow

Although the scope of your paper might seem overwhelming at the start, generally the narrower the thesis the more effective your argument will be. Your thesis or claim must be supported by evidence. The broader your claim is, the more evidence you will need to convince readers that your position is right.

Example of a thesis that is too broad:

There are several reasons this statement is too broad to argue. First, what is included in the category "drugs"? Is the author talking about illegal drug use, recreational drug use (which might include alcohol and cigarettes), or all uses of medication in general? Second, in what ways are drugs detrimental? Is drug use causing deaths (and is the author equating deaths from overdoses and deaths from drug related violence)? Is drug use changing the moral climate or causing the economy to decline? Finally, what does the author mean by "society"? Is the author referring only to America or to the global population? Does the author make any distinction between the effects on children and adults? There are just too many questions that the claim leaves open. The author could not cover all of the topics listed above, yet the generality of the claim leaves all of these possibilities open to debate.

Example of a narrow or focused thesis:

In this example the topic of drugs has been narrowed down to illegal drugs and the detriment has been narrowed down to gang violence. This is a much more manageable topic.

We could narrow each debatable thesis from the previous examples in the following way:

Narrowed debatable thesis 1:

This thesis narrows the scope of the argument by specifying not just the amount of money used but also how the money could actually help to control pollution.

Narrowed debatable thesis 2:

This thesis narrows the scope of the argument by specifying not just what the focus of a national anti-pollution campaign should be but also why this is the appropriate focus.

Qualifiers such as " typically ," " generally ," " usually ," or " on average " also help to limit the scope of your claim by allowing for the almost inevitable exception to the rule.

Types of claims

Claims typically fall into one of four categories. Thinking about how you want to approach your topic, or, in other words, what type of claim you want to make, is one way to focus your thesis on one particular aspect of your broader topic.

Claims of fact or definition: These claims argue about what the definition of something is or whether something is a settled fact. Example:

Claims of cause and effect: These claims argue that one person, thing, or event caused another thing or event to occur. Example:

Claims about value: These are claims made of what something is worth, whether we value it or not, how we would rate or categorize something. Example:

Claims about solutions or policies: These are claims that argue for or against a certain solution or policy approach to a problem. Example:

Which type of claim is right for your argument? Which type of thesis or claim you use for your argument will depend on your position and knowledge of the topic, your audience, and the context of your paper. You might want to think about where you imagine your audience to be on this topic and pinpoint where you think the biggest difference in viewpoints might be. Even if you start with one type of claim you probably will be using several within the paper. Regardless of the type of claim you choose to utilize it is key to identify the controversy or debate you are addressing and to define your position early on in the paper.

Write articles in minutes

Write faster with 70+ templates

Do your work 3x faster

Make images with AI

Support & live chat with customers

Build better customer relationships

Give 24/7 self-service support

Write content fluently in 30+ languages

10 Proven Steps: How to Find the Thesis of an Article - Guide 2024

10 Proven Steps How to Find the Thesis of an Article  Guide 2024

Here are 10 important statistics about finding the thesis of an article:

  • Over 80% of readers struggle to identify the thesis of an article.
  • Only 20% of readers actively look for the thesis statement.
  • Articles with clear and concise thesis statements receive 50% more engagement.
  • Readers spend an average of 15 seconds searching for the thesis statement.
  • Articles without a clear thesis statement have a 70% higher bounce rate.
  • Thesis statements help readers understand the main argument of an article.
  • Identifying the thesis statement can improve reading comprehension by 40%.
  • Articles with well-defined thesis statements are more likely to be shared on social media.
  • Effective thesis statements provide a roadmap for the rest of the article.
  • Understanding the thesis statement is crucial for critical analysis of an article.

1. What is a Thesis Statement?

1  what is a thesis statement

A thesis statement is a concise summary of the main argument or point of an article. It is usually found in the introduction or early paragraphs of an article and provides a roadmap for the reader. A strong thesis statement helps readers understand the purpose and focus of the article.

What is the purpose of a thesis statement?

The purpose of a thesis statement is to clearly communicate the main argument or point of an article. It helps guide the reader and provides a framework for understanding the content that follows.

Example of me using AtOnce's AIDA framework generator to improve ad copy and marketing:

AtOnce AIDA framework generator

2. Why is Finding the Thesis Important?

2  why is finding the thesis important

Finding the thesis of an article is important for several reasons:

Improves Reading Comprehension

Understanding the thesis statement helps readers grasp the main argument and key points of an article. This improves overall reading comprehension and allows readers to engage more effectively with the content.

Identifies the Main Argument

The thesis statement identifies the main argument or point that the author is trying to make. By finding the thesis, readers can better understand the author's perspective and evaluate the strength of their argument.

Provides a Roadmap

A clear thesis statement provides a roadmap for the rest of the article. It outlines the main points and structure of the content, making it easier for readers to follow along and navigate through the article.

Aids in Critical Analysis

Identifying the thesis statement is crucial for critical analysis of an article. It allows readers to evaluate the author's reasoning, evidence, and overall effectiveness in supporting their main argument.

3. Steps to Find the Thesis of an Article

3  steps to find the thesis of an article

Step 1: Read the Introduction

Start by reading the introduction of the article. The thesis statement is often found in this section, as it sets the tone and purpose of the article.

Step 2: Look for Clear Statements

Pay attention to clear and concise statements that express the main argument or point of the article. These statements are likely to be the thesis statement.

Step 3: Identify Key Words

Identify key words or phrases that indicate the main focus of the article. These words are often repeated throughout the article and can help you locate the thesis statement.

Step 4: Analyze the Structure

Analyze the structure of the article. The thesis statement is usually located at the beginning or end of the introduction, but it can also be found in other sections such as the conclusion or topic sentences of paragraphs.

Step 5: Consider the Author's Perspective

Consider the author's perspective and purpose for writing the article. This can help you identify the main argument or point that the author is trying to convey.

Step 6: Look for Supporting Evidence

Look for supporting evidence or arguments that align with a central idea. These supporting points often lead back to the thesis statement.

Step 7: Pay Attention to Tone

Pay attention to the tone of the article. The thesis statement is usually expressed with confidence and authority, reflecting the author's stance on the topic.

Step 8: Consider the Article's Context

Consider the context of the article, including the publication, author's background, and intended audience. This can provide clues about the main argument or point of the article.

Step 9: Summarize the Article

Summarize the main points and arguments of the article. This can help you identify the overarching theme or main argument that the thesis statement supports.

Step 10: Revise and Refine

Revise and refine your understanding of the thesis statement as you read through the article. Adjust your interpretation based on new information and evidence that emerges.

4. Common Challenges in Finding the Thesis

4  common challenges in finding the thesis

Lack of Clarity

Some articles may lack a clear and concise thesis statement, making it challenging for readers to identify the main argument or point.

Complex Language

Articles that use complex language or technical terms can make it difficult for readers to locate the thesis statement. Simplifying the language can help improve clarity.

Example of me using AtOnce's AI language generator to write fluently & grammatically correct in any language:

AtOnce AI language generator

Hidden Thesis Statements

Some authors may choose to hide the thesis statement within the article, making it harder for readers to find. Close reading and careful analysis are necessary in such cases.

Multiple Perspectives

Articles that present multiple perspectives or arguments may have more than one thesis statement. Identifying the main thesis can be challenging in these cases.

5. Tips for Finding the Thesis

5  tips for finding the thesis

Read Actively

Engage actively with the article by highlighting key points, taking notes, and asking questions. This can help you identify the main argument or point.

Focus on the Introduction

The introduction often contains the thesis statement or provides clues about the main argument. Pay close attention to this section of the article.

Look for Repetition

Identify key words or phrases that are repeated throughout the article. These repetitions can indicate the main focus and help you locate the thesis statement.

Consider the Author's Purpose

Think about why the author wrote the article and what they hope to achieve. This can provide insights into the main argument or point.

Discuss with Others

Engage in discussions with others who have read the article. Sharing perspectives and interpretations can help you refine your understanding of the thesis statement.

6. Examples of Strong Thesis Statements

6  examples of strong thesis statements

"The use of renewable energy sources is essential for reducing carbon emissions and mitigating the effects of climate change."

"The legalization of marijuana for medical purposes has proven to be an effective treatment option for various health conditions."

"The education system should prioritize critical thinking skills over rote memorization to prepare students for the challenges of the 21st century."

7. Conclusion

7  conclusion

Finding the thesis of an article is a crucial skill that improves reading comprehension and critical analysis. By following the proven steps outlined in this guide, readers can confidently identify the main argument or point of any article. Remember to read actively, analyze the structure, and consider the author's perspective to uncover the thesis statement. With practice, finding the thesis will become easier, leading to a deeper understanding of the articles you read.

Over 15,763 SEO agencies and brands are using AtOnce to rank higher on Google.

It lets you write hundreds of articles on any topic, giving you more clicks to your site.

how to find a thesis statement in a newspaper article

Get more traffic and sales — without wasting months of your time.

What is the purpose of a thesis in an article?

The purpose of a thesis in an article is to provide a clear and concise statement that summarizes the main argument or point of the article. It helps guide the reader and sets the direction for the rest of the content.

How can I identify the thesis of an article?

To identify the thesis of an article, you can start by reading the introduction and conclusion carefully. Look for a sentence or two that presents a central claim or argument. Additionally, pay attention to any recurring themes or ideas throughout the article that may indicate the thesis.

Why is it important to find the thesis of an article?

Finding the thesis of an article is important because it helps you understand the main point or argument the author is trying to make. It allows you to critically analyze the article and evaluate its validity and relevance to your own research or understanding of the topic.

Asim Akhtar

Asim Akhtar

Asim is the CEO & founder of AtOnce. After 5 years of marketing & customer service experience, he's now using Artificial Intelligence to save people time.

  • How to Cite
  • Language & Lit
  • Rhyme & Rhythm
  • The Rewrite
  • Search Glass

How to Write a Thesis Statement for an Article Critique

Article critiques should always discuss the author's main points, how they argue those points and any weaknesses in the argument. A thesis statement for such a critique should encompass your general response to the main arguments in the original article and can also suggest some further insights you would give to the main article's premise. Writing a few rough drafts of the thesis statement will help you refine the main argument of your article critique.

Note all the main points you will bring up in the article critique on a sheet of scratch paper. For example: the original author's main point, their main emphases in the article, and the strengths and the weaknesses of the article. These points will comprise the main points you will be making in the article and the potential ideas that will make up your thesis statement.

Connect the main points from Step 1 into your concise argument or response regarding the article. For example, the author may be talking about issues with dyslexia, which adds to the literature on the topic, but they do not problematize a couple of their sources. A possible conclusion you would draw from these factors would be that the article is helpful in building on earlier authors, but fails to complete the argument because of weak sources.

Practice writing sentences that reflect your ideas from Step 2. For example, "This article adds valuable emphasis to work done on the level of stress experienced by children with dyslexia, although the author could have used stronger sources." This statement could be made into more than one sentence if there is too much information for a single sentence. The thesis statement should tell the reader where you are going with your response to the critique, and open up the rest of the critique.

Place the thesis statement in the first paragraph of the article critique. Often, the thesis will come near the end of the first paragraph.

  • Edit the thesis as your article critique changes. Your critique will transform as you write, and so will your thesis statement.

Things You'll Need

  • OWL Purdue: Creating a Thesis Statement

Sarah Vrba has been a writer and editor since 2006. She has contributed to "Seed," "AND Magazine," Care2 Causes and "202 Magazine," among other outlets, focusing on fashion, pop culture, style and identity. Vrba holds an M.A. in history with an emphasis on gender and fashion in the 19th century.

Thesis Statement Finder

Looking for help with your thesis? Try our thesis statement finder tool! It will help you create a custom-made thesis statement for an argumentative, informative, or comparative essay.

Need some help with formulating a thesis? This thesis statement finder will save your time and nerves! Follow these 3 steps:

  • 👌 The Tool’s Benefits
  • 🕵️ Finding a Thesis in a Text
  • 🤔 Formulating Your Thesis
  • ✅ Checklist with Examples

🔗 References

👌 thesis statement finder: 4 benefits.

  • This thesis statement finder works for any essay type (argumentative, analytical, compare-and-contrast, or informative ). You can specify it for a better result. Besides, the program offers a thesis example specifically for each genre.
  • It is intuitively clear . You can check ready-made thesis examples during your work with the tool. All the samples are education-related, as this is the subject area of this website.
  • The tool is 100% free . We don’t charge our users either at the first instance of their using the thesis statement finder or afterward.
  • It doesn’t require registration . We have done our best to eliminate all the unnecessary features that could eat up your time.

🕵️ How to Find a Thesis Statement in a Text

A thesis statement is the last sentence of the introductory paragraph.

If your text is longer, for example, in a research paper, you can find this sentence at the end of the introduction.

But to make sure the line you’ve spotted is the one, you should know the roles of a thesis statement.

  • It describes the principal idea of the essay. Besides, it unifies all the main body statements under a shared message.

Online education is beneficial for low-income students because it gives them better access to education resources, trains their online learning skills, and eliminates the need to travel abroad.

Here the author united three random facts under a single idea that online education helps poor students.

  • It foreshadows the focus of the essay and narrows down the scope of the text.

This essay will explore the adverse consequences of globalization in terms of third-world economic development.

Here the author puts away the positive effects of globalization and focuses on the negative outcome for the developing economies.

  • It presents the writer’s position in the argument.

This essay aims to prove that a prison sentence does not rehabilitate dangerous criminals.

This example implies the author’s opinion: confinement is ineffective for severe offenders.

  • It promises to explain every statement of the thesis statement.

All the examples above tell the reader that they will find a proper explanation in the main body. However, the first variant gives only a hint, and the other two provide an explicit formula: “This essay will…”

Implicit Thesis Statements

A PhD thesis statement is explicit and takes the form of a separate sentence in the first part of the dissertation. Still, some types of academic writing include the thesis only in the conclusion .

On the other hand, you’ll rarely find a specific sentence summing up the central concept in literary works. On the contrary, your job as the reader is to find out what the piece conveys. In such cases, you have to deal with an implicit thesis statement, i.e., the message is transmitted indirectly throughout the entire work. (In literature, we call it the theme.)

Academic papers may also rely on implicit thesis statements, although quite rarely.

🤔 Finding a Thesis for Your Paper in 3 Steps

A thesis statement is a line that sums up the key message of your paper. Unfortunately, you will never formulate it on the first try before the entire work is ready. After all, a good thesis comprises your principal conclusions. You will work on this single sentence throughout the time you dedicate to the paper. And even if you come up with an idea in the process, it will likely require editing.

Still, you’ll have to formulate an initial or working thesis statement at the beginning of your work on a Master’s or PhD topic. It will also create direction and structure in the essay. Here’s how you can do it.

Step 1: Formulate the Question

If your assignment already contains the question, you can skip this point. You’ll have to distill the task into a single interrogatory sentence in all the other cases. No matter how complicated the assignment is, it is always possible to reduce it.

For example, consider the task:

Based on the proposed literature, research the positive and negative features of the teaching methods of the previous century.

If you turn it into a question, you’ll get:

What were the positive and negative features of the teaching methods of the previous century?

If an assignment contains several questions, look for the most general one. The remaining ones will help you structure the text.

Step 2: Draft up the Answer to the Question

Once you’ve completed the initial research and determined your opinion about the studied problem, write down a tentative answer to the question we described above. It will be non-academic and straightforward at this point but enough to guide the research and writing. Here is an explanation of what you are expected to write in a thesis statement of each essay genre. Press “Show Example” to consult the illustrations of each variant in our tool.

  • In an argumentative essay , take a side on the issue by stating your opinion.
  • In an analytical essay , list the main findings of your research and offer a solution.
  • In a compare and contrast essay , highlight whether the compared categories are similar or different and explain why.
  • In an informative article , outline the scope of your research and name the key facts.

Step 3: Add Details

Your answer will flesh out as you read into the topic and start writing on it. This step narrows down the scope of your future research and saves you much time. The more specific the thesis statement is, the less literature you’ll have to search for the necessary facts.

Why is this your answer? How do you plan to convince the reader? Which information should be mentioned in this sentence to disambiguate it? The final version of a thesis statement doesn’t just clarify your opinion. It summarizes the argument and states what it does not comprise.

For instance, your draft answer was as follows:

Screen time is bad because it deteriorates eyesight and increases nervousness.

Thus, a final version could be:

Extended screen time for children under ten years old is unwanted, as it deteriorates their eyesight and raises the possibility of nervous disorders.

✅ Thesis Statement Checklist with Examples

Below you can find a thesis generator free checker: look through the checklist to verify the result.

Thus, a good thesis statement:

  • Is focused enough for the reader to know what it is not about.
  • Expresses your opinion on the problem under investigation.
  • Is formulated as a statement without self-interrogation.
  • Opens a discussion with the reader.
  • Is brief and fits in one or two sentences.
  • Can be easily found in the text.

📌 Thesis Statement Finder FAQ

What is the thesis finder.

A thesis statement finder is a tool that analyses your central finding and the evidence you used in its support to create a perfect thesis. It is adjustable to the essay genre in question, as the same thesis for an analytical and argumentative text will be different. If you doubt the genre, you can check the example.

Find a Thesis Statement?

A thesis statement is located at the end of the last introductory paragraph in most texts. More rarely, it can be found in the conclusion. But most literary works and even some academic papers have an implicit thesis statement. To know if you’ve spotted the right sentence, check if it conveys the central message of the text.

What Is an Example of a Thesis Statement?

  • The growth of the human population changes and breaks down the traditional social structures.
  • This essay aims to establish the relationship between low income and substance abuse in young people.
  • This research has demonstrated that punishment is a less efficient educational strategy than encouragement.

How Long Is a Thesis Statement?

If you ask this question doubting how to write a thesis statement correctly, don’t make it longer than two sentences. One would be even better. Professional researchers working on a hundred-page text can formulate their thesis in three or even four sentences. But for educational purposes, that is too much.

  • Thesis Statements – UNC Writing Center
  • How to Write a Thesis Statement
  • Developing A Thesis
  • Developing a Thesis Statement – UW-Madison Writing Center
  • How to Write a Good Thesis Statement – ThoughtCo

Module 2: Critical Reading

Identifying thesis statements, introduction, learning objectives.

  • identify explicit thesis statements in texts
  • identify implicit thesis statements in texts
  • identify strategies for using thesis statements to predict content of texts

Being able to identify the purpose and thesis of a text, as you’re reading it, takes practice. This section will offer you that practice.

One fun strategy for developing a deeper understanding the material you’re reading is to make a visual “map” of the ideas. Mind maps, whether hand-drawn or done through computer programs, can be fun to make, and help put all the ideas of an essay you’re reading in one easy-to-read format.

Your understanding of what the “central” element of the mind map is might change as you read and re-read. Developing the central idea of your mind map is a great way to help you determine the reading’s thesis.

The center is a yellow star-shaped human form, labeled Dave. Primary lines leading away from it include "free," "Aranya," and "Anger." Color-coded lines lead to phrases that are difficult to see clearly.

Hand-drawn Mind Map

Locating Explicit and Implicit Thesis Statements

In academic writing, the thesis is often explicit : it is included as a sentence as part of the text. It might be near the beginning of the work, but not always–some types of academic writing leave the thesis until the conclusion.

Journalism and reporting also rely on explicit thesis statements that appear very early in the piece–the first paragraph or even the first sentence.

Works of literature, on the other hand, usually do not contain a specific sentence that sums up the core concept of the writing. However, readers should finish the piece with a good understanding of what the work was trying to convey. This is what’s called an implicit thesis statement: the primary point of the reading is conveyed indirectly, in multiple locations throughout the work. (In literature, this is also referred to as the theme of the work.)

Academic writing sometimes relies on implicit thesis statements, as well.

This video offers excellent guidance in identifying the thesis statement of a work, no matter if it’s explicit or implicit.

Topic Sentences

We’ve learned that a thesis statement conveys the primary message of an entire piece of text. Now, let’s look at the next level of important sentences in a piece of text: topic sentences in each paragraph.

A useful metaphor would be to think of the thesis statement of a text as a general: it controls all the major decisions of the writing. There is only one thesis statement in a text. Topic sentences, in this relationship, serve as captains: they organize and sub-divide the overall goals of a writing into individual components. Each paragraph will have a topic sentence.

Graphic labeled Parts of a Paragraph. It shows a hamburger separated into different layers. From the top down, they are labeled "topic sentence (top bun)"; "supporting details (tomatoes, lettuce, and meat)"; "colourful vocabulary (mustard, ketchup, and relish)"; "concluding sentence (bottom bun)."

It might be helpful to think of a topic sentence as working in two directions simultaneously. It relates the paragraph to the essay’s thesis, and thereby acts as a signpost for the argument of the paper as a whole, but it also defines the scope of the paragraph itself. For example, consider the following topic sentence:

Many characters in Lorraine Hansberry’s play  A Raisin in the Sun have one particular dream in which they are following, though the character Walter pursues his most aggressively.

If this sentence controls the paragraph that follows, then all sentences in the paragraph must relate in some way to Walter and the pursuit of his dream.

Topic sentences often act like tiny thesis statements. Like a thesis statement, a topic sentence makes a claim of some sort. As the thesis statement is the unifying force in the essay, so the topic sentence must be the unifying force in the paragraph. Further, as is the case with the thesis statement, when the topic sentence makes a claim, the paragraph which follows must expand, describe, or prove it in some way. Topic sentences make a point and give reasons or examples to support it.

The topic sentence is often, though not always, the first sentence of a paragraph.

  • Outcome: Thesis. Provided by : Lumen Learning. License : CC BY: Attribution
  • Revision and Adaptation of Topic Sentences. Provided by : Lumen Learning. License : CC BY: Attribution
  • Image of hand-drawn mind map. Authored by : Aranya. Located at : https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Guru_Mindmap.jpg . License : CC BY-SA: Attribution-ShareAlike
  • Topic Sentences. Authored by : Ms. Beardslee. Located at : http://msbeardslee.wikispaces.com/Topic+Sentences?showComments=1 . License : CC BY-SA: Attribution-ShareAlike
  • Image of Parts of a Paragraph. Authored by : Enokson. Located at : https://flic.kr/p/ak9H3v . License : CC BY: Attribution
  • How to Identify the Thesis Statement. Authored by : Martha Ann Kennedy. Located at : https://youtu.be/di1cQgc1akg . License : All Rights Reserved . License Terms : Standard YouTube License

Williams logo

  • Research Guides
  • How to Find Newspaper Articles
  • From A Specific Newspaper

How to Find Newspaper Articles: From A Specific Newspaper

  • Introduction
  • Recent News
  • Historical News
  • By Type of Article

See the bar on the left to navigate this section of the guide.

From a Specific Newspaper

If you have a citation.

  • Search the library catalog  by Title for the title of the newspaper to see if it is available in print, through an online database, or on microfilm.
  • Check what dates are available in the "Get It" section (for print/microfilm) or "View It" section (for online access).
  • If we don't own the title or date you need, use interlibrary loan to request a scan.

If You Need To Find Articles

If you do not have citations for newspaper articles in the specific publication, you will need to find an online version of the newspaper , use a newspaper index , or browse for articles .

Find an online version of the newspaper

  • Search the library catalog  for the newspaper title.
  • Look for a record that says Online
  • Click into the record and look at the dates in the "View It" section to see whether the time frame you need is available for searching.
  • Click on the link for the correct time frame.
  • Enter your search terms. The results should include only articles from the newspaper title you chose. If not, look for a publication title limit or database selection option to choose the needed title.

If you don't see an online version in the library catalog or it is the wrong time period, try finding freely available digitized versions through:

  • Williams WorldCat  
  • International Coalition on Newspapers list of  newspaper digitization projects
  • Google News Archive Search

Note: if you find an online newspaper that allows free searching, but doesn't provide the full text of the article for free, don't pay for the article. If it provides the full citation (article title, newspaper title, date, page numbers), use request a scan through interlibrary loan .

Use a newspaper index

If an online searchable version of the newspaper is not available, there may be an index available to help you identify articles on your topic.  Some indexes are created by a public library for their local newspaper or by a company for larger regional/national newspapers. To find an index:

  • See the Library of Congress list of U.S. Newspaper Archives & Indexes
  • Search Williams WorldCat  for [name of newspaper] index (e.g., Boston Globe index) Look for format journal/magazine or newspaper. Be sure to look at what years the index was published. Most indexes are issued on an annual basis, so you may need to look at multiple volumes if your research topic covers several years.

If you find a print index, you can try requesting the year(s) you need through interlibrary loan , but you may need to visit a library that has it or contact librarians at that institution for assistance.

Browse for articles

If there is no online version or indexing available, you will need to go through the newspaper (most likely on microfilm) yourself to find articles of interest. This process is easier if you are looking for articles about a particular event so that you can limit your browsing to a few issues before and/or after the date. If you are looking for a general topic (e.g., women during the civil rights movement) such browsing will be very time consuming. In this case, take advantage of research that has already been done on the topic. Search for scholarly articles or books and examine their footnotes to find citations.

If the library doesn't own the newspaper: 

  • Search the  Center for Research Libraries (CRL) newspaper catalog  or Williams WorldCat  to determine whether it is available on microfilm.
  • Request the month(s) and year(s) you need through interlibrary loan .

​ Since browsing through newspapers can be time consuming, limit your request to 10 reels at a time (1 reel is approximately equivalent to two weeks for a daily newspaper ).

Individual Newspaper Databases

The following newspapers are available as separate databases that allow you to search the content of that newspaper only. To find articles from newspapers not on this list, especially current newspapers, search the library catalog for the newspaper title to get links to databases that contain the newspaper.

Williams only resource

Need Help? You can ask!

Other ways to get help:

Call us at 413-597-4500

Text us at 413-648-6071

Stop by during our service hours .

  • << Previous: Historical News
  • Next: By Type of Article >>
  • Last Updated: Jan 30, 2024 5:40 PM
  • URL: https://libguides.williams.edu/newspaper-articles

Artificial Intelligence Computing Leadership from NVIDIA

Press Release Details

Nvidia announces financial results for fourth quarter and fiscal 2024.

  • Record quarterly revenue of $22.1 billion, up 22% from Q3, up 265% from year ago 
  • Record quarterly Data Center revenue of $18.4 billion, up 27% from Q3, up 409% from year ago
  • Record full-year revenue of $60.9 billion, up 126%

SANTA CLARA, Calif., Feb. 21, 2024 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- NVIDIA (NASDAQ: NVDA) today reported revenue for the fourth quarter ended January 28, 2024, of $22.1 billion, up 22% from the previous quarter and up 265% from a year ago.

For the quarter, GAAP earnings per diluted share was $4.93, up 33% from the previous quarter and up 765% from a year ago. Non-GAAP earnings per diluted share was $5.16, up 28% from the previous quarter and up 486% from a year ago.

For fiscal 2024, revenue was up 126% to $60.9 billion. GAAP earnings per diluted share was $11.93, up 586% from a year ago. Non-GAAP earnings per diluted share was $12.96, up 288% from a year ago.

“Accelerated computing and generative AI have hit the tipping point. Demand is surging worldwide across companies, industries and nations,” said Jensen Huang, founder and CEO of NVIDIA.

“Our Data Center platform is powered by increasingly diverse drivers — demand for data processing, training and inference from large cloud-service providers and GPU-specialized ones, as well as from enterprise software and consumer internet companies. Vertical industries — led by auto, financial services and healthcare — are now at a multibillion-dollar level.

“NVIDIA RTX, introduced less than six years ago, is now a massive PC platform for generative AI, enjoyed by 100 million gamers and creators. The year ahead will bring major new product cycles with exceptional innovations to help propel our industry forward. Come join us at next month’s GTC, where we and our rich ecosystem will reveal the exciting future ahead,” he said.

NVIDIA will pay its next quarterly cash dividend of $0.04 per share on March 27, 2024, to all shareholders of record on March 6, 2024.

Q4 Fiscal 2024 Summary

Fiscal 2024 Summary

Outlook NVIDIA’s outlook for the first quarter of fiscal 2025 is as follows:

  • Revenue is expected to be $24.0 billion, plus or minus 2%.
  • GAAP and non-GAAP gross margins are expected to be 76.3% and 77.0%, respectively, plus or minus 50 basis points.
  • GAAP and non-GAAP operating expenses are expected to be approximately $3.5 billion and $2.5 billion, respectively.
  • GAAP and non-GAAP other income and expense are expected to be an income of approximately $250 million, excluding gains and losses from non-affiliated investments.
  • GAAP and non-GAAP tax rates are expected to be 17.0%, plus or minus 1%, excluding any discrete items.

NVIDIA achieved progress since its previous earnings announcement in these areas: 

Data Center

  • Fourth-quarter revenue was a record $18.4 billion, up 27% from the previous quarter and up 409% from a year ago. Full-year revenue rose 217% to a record $47.5 billion.
  • Launched, in collaboration with Google, optimizations across NVIDIA’s data center and PC AI platforms for Gemma , Google’s groundbreaking open language models.
  • Expanded its strategic collaboration with Amazon Web Services to host NVIDIA ® DGX™ Cloud on AWS.
  • Announced that Amgen will use the NVIDIA DGX SuperPOD ™ to power insights into drug discovery, diagnostics and precision medicine.
  • Announced  NVIDIA NeMo™ Retriever , a generative AI microservice that lets enterprises connect custom large language models with enterprise data to deliver highly accurate responses for AI applications. 
  • Introduced NVIDIA MONAI™ cloud APIs to help developers and platform providers integrate AI into their medical-imaging offerings. 
  • Announced that Singtel will bring generative AI services to Singapore through energy-efficient data centers that the telco is building with NVIDIA Hopper™ architecture GPUs.
  • Introduced plans with Cisco to help enterprises quickly and easily deploy and manage secure AI infrastructure.
  • Supported the National Artificial Intelligence Research Resource pilot program , a major step by the U.S. government toward a shared national research infrastructure.
  • Fourth-quarter revenue was $2.9 billion, flat from the previous quarter and up 56% from a year ago. Full-year revenue rose 15% to $10.4 billion.
  • Launched GeForce RTX™ 40 SUPER Series GPUs , starting at $599, which support the latest NVIDIA RTX™ technologies, including DLSS 3.5 Ray Reconstruction and NVIDIA Reflex.
  • Announced generative AI capabilities for its installed base of over 100 million RTX AI PCs, including Tensor-RT™ LLM to accelerate inference on large language models, and Chat with RTX, a tech demo that lets users personalize a chatbot with their own content.
  • Introduced microservices for the NVIDIA Avatar Cloud Engine , allowing game and application developers to integrate state-of-the-art generative AI models into non-playable characters.
  • Reached the milestone of 500 AI-powered RTX games and applications utilizing NVIDIA DLSS, ray tracing and other NVIDIA RTX technologies.

Professional Visualization

  • Fourth-quarter revenue was $463 million, up 11% from the previous quarter and up 105% from a year ago. Full-year revenue rose 1% to $1.6 billion.
  • Announced adoption of NVIDIA Omniverse ™ by the global automotive-configurator ecosystem.
  • Announced the NVIDIA RTX 2000 Ada Generation GPU , bringing the latest AI, graphics and compute technology to compact workstations.
  • Fourth-quarter revenue was $281 million, up 8% from the previous quarter and down 4% from a year ago. Full-year revenue rose 21% to $1.1 billion.
  • Announced further adoption of its NVIDIA DRIVE ® platform , with Great Wall Motors, ZEEKR and Xiaomi using DRIVE Orin™ to power intelligent automated-driving systems and Li Auto selecting DRIVE Thor™ as its centralized car computer.

CFO Commentary Commentary on the quarter by Colette Kress, NVIDIA’s executive vice president and chief financial officer, is available at https://investor.nvidia.com .

Conference Call and Webcast Information NVIDIA will conduct a conference call with analysts and investors to discuss its fourth quarter and fiscal 2024 financial results and current financial prospects today at 2 p.m. Pacific time (5 p.m. Eastern time). A live webcast (listen-only mode) of the conference call will be accessible at NVIDIA’s investor relations website, https://investor.nvidia.com . The webcast will be recorded and available for replay until NVIDIA’s conference call to discuss its financial results for its first quarter of fiscal 2025.

Non-GAAP Measures To supplement NVIDIA’s condensed consolidated financial statements presented in accordance with GAAP, the company uses non-GAAP measures of certain components of financial performance. These non-GAAP measures include non-GAAP gross profit, non-GAAP gross margin, non-GAAP operating expenses, non-GAAP income from operations, non-GAAP other income (expense), net, non-GAAP net income, non-GAAP net income, or earnings, per diluted share, and free cash flow. For NVIDIA’s investors to be better able to compare its current results with those of previous periods, the company has shown a reconciliation of GAAP to non-GAAP financial measures. These reconciliations adjust the related GAAP financial measures to exclude acquisition termination costs, stock-based compensation expense, acquisition-related and other costs, IP-related costs, other, gains and losses from non-affiliated investments, interest expense related to amortization of debt discount, and the associated tax impact of these items where applicable. Free cash flow is calculated as GAAP net cash provided by operating activities less both purchases related to property and equipment and intangible assets and principal payments on property and equipment and intangible assets. NVIDIA believes the presentation of its non-GAAP financial measures enhances the user’s overall understanding of the company’s historical financial performance. The presentation of the company’s non-GAAP financial measures is not meant to be considered in isolation or as a substitute for the company’s financial results prepared in accordance with GAAP, and the company’s non-GAAP measures may be different from non-GAAP measures used by other companies.

About NVIDIA Since its founding in 1993, NVIDIA (NASDAQ: NVDA) has been a pioneer in accelerated computing. The company’s invention of the GPU in 1999 sparked the growth of the PC gaming market, redefined computer graphics, ignited the era of modern AI and is fueling industrial digitalization across markets. NVIDIA is now a full-stack computing infrastructure company with data-center-scale offerings that are reshaping industry. More information at https://nvidianews.nvidia.com/ .

Certain statements in this press release including, but not limited to, statements as to: demand for accelerated computing and generative AI surging worldwide across companies, industries and nations; our Data Center platform being powered by increasingly diverse drivers, including demand for data processing, training and inference from large cloud-service providers and GPU-specialized ones, as well as from enterprise software and consumer internet companies; vertical industries led by auto, financial, services and healthcare now at a multibillion-dollar level; NVIDIA RTX becoming a massive PC platform for generative AI enjoyed by 100 million gamers and creators; the year ahead bringing major new product cycles with exceptional innovations to help propel our industry forward; our upcoming conference at GTC, where we and our rich ecosystem will reveal the exciting future ahead; NVIDIA’s next quarterly cash dividend; NVIDIA’s financial outlook and expected tax rates for the first quarter of fiscal 2025; the benefits, impact, performance, features and availability of NVIDIA’s products and technologies, including NVIDIA AI platforms, NVIDIA DGX Cloud, NVIDIA DGX SuperPOD, NVIDIA NeMo Retriever, NVIDIA MONAI cloud APIs, NVIDIA Hopper architecture GPUs, NVIDIA GeForce RTX 40 SUPER Series GPUs, NVIDIA DLSS 3.5 Ray Reconstruction, NVIDIA Reflex, NVIDIA TensorRT-LLM, Chat with RTX, microservices for the NVIDIA Avatar Cloud Engine, NVIDIA DLSS, ray tracing and other NVIDIA RTX technologies, NVIDIA Omniverse, NVIDIA RTX 2000 Ada Generation GPU, NVIDIA DRIVE platform, NVIDIA DRIVE Orin and NVIDIA DRIVE Thor; and our collaborations with third parties are forward-looking statements that are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause results to be materially different than expectations. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially include: global economic conditions; our reliance on third parties to manufacture, assemble, package and test our products; the impact of technological development and competition; development of new products and technologies or enhancements to our existing product and technologies; market acceptance of our products or our partners’ products; design, manufacturing or software defects; changes in consumer preferences or demands; changes in industry standards and interfaces; and unexpected loss of performance of our products or technologies when integrated into systems, as well as other factors detailed from time to time in the most recent reports NVIDIA files with the Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC, including, but not limited to, its annual report on Form 10-K and quarterly reports on Form 10-Q. Copies of reports filed with the SEC are posted on the company’s website and are available from NVIDIA without charge. These forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and speak only as of the date hereof, and, except as required by law, NVIDIA disclaims any obligation to update these forward-looking statements to reflect future events or circumstances.

© 2024 NVIDIA Corporation. All rights reserved. NVIDIA, the NVIDIA logo, GeForce, GeForce RTX, NVIDIA DGX, NVIDIA DGX SuperPOD, NVIDIA DRIVE, NVIDIA DRIVE Orin, NVIDIA DRIVE Thor, NVIDIA Hopper, NVIDIA MONAI, NVIDIA NeMo, NVIDIA Omniverse, NVIDIA RTX and TensorRT are trademarks and/or registered trademarks of NVIDIA Corporation in the U.S. and/or other countries. Other company and product names may be trademarks of the respective companies with which they are associated. Features, pricing, availability and specifications are subject to change without notice.

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/38343cb8-8bc8-42b0-aa76-e3d280ae5507

how to find a thesis statement in a newspaper article

NVIDIA Corporate Offices

how to find a thesis statement in a newspaper article

NVIDIA's Silicon Valley campus in Santa Clara, Calif.

Quick links.

  • Email Alerts
  • Request Printed Materials
  • Download Library

To receive notifications via email, enter your email address and select at least one subscription below. After submitting your information, you will receive an email. You must click the link in the email to activate your subscription. You can sign up for additional subscriptions at any time.

Email Alert Sign Up Confirmation

Investor contact.

2788 San Tomas Expressway Santa Clara, CA 95051

  • Contact Investor Relations

Investor Resources

  • Request Information
  • Stock Quote & Chart
  • Historical Price Lookup
  • Investment Calculator
  • Fundamentals
  • Analyst Coverage
  • Management Team
  • Board of Directors
  • Governance Documents
  • Committee Composition
  • Contact the Board
  • Corporate Social Responsibility
  • Events & Presentations

Financial Info

  • Financial Reports
  • SEC Filings
  • Quarterly Results
  • Annual Reports and Proxies

Investors and others should note that we announce material financial information to our investors using our investor relations website, press releases, SEC filings and public conference calls and webcasts. We intend to use our  @NVIDIA  Twitter account,  NVIDIA Facebook  page,  NVIDIA LinkedIn  page and company  blog  as a means of disclosing information about our company, our services and other matters and for complying with our disclosure obligations under Regulation FD. The information we post through these social media channels may be deemed material. Accordingly, investors should monitor these accounts and the blog, in addition to following our press releases, SEC filings and public conference calls and webcasts. This list may be updated from time to time.

how to find a thesis statement in a newspaper article

  • Privacy Policy
  • Election 2024
  • Entertainment
  • Newsletters
  • Photography
  • Press Releases
  • Israel-Hamas War
  • Russia-Ukraine War
  • Latin America
  • Middle East
  • Asia Pacific
  • AP Top 25 College Football Poll
  • Movie reviews
  • Book reviews
  • Financial Markets
  • Business Highlights
  • Financial wellness
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Social Media

How is an ex-FBI informant charged with lying about Bidens allegedly linked to Russian intelligence?

Members of Congress react to an FBI informant in the Biden investigation being charged with lying to his FBI handler. Prosecutors laid out “extensive and extremely recent” contact Smirnov had with people aligned with Russian intelligence. (Feb. 21) (AP Video/Dan Huff)

Former FBI informant Alexander Smirnov, center, leaves the courthouse on Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2024, in Las Vegas. Prosecutors say that Smirnov, who is charged with making up a multimillion-dollar bribery scheme involving President Joe Biden, his son Hunter and a Ukrainian energy company, had contacts with Russian intelligence-affiliated officials. (Bizuayehu Tesfaye/Las Vegas Review-Journal via AP)

Former FBI informant Alexander Smirnov, center, leaves the courthouse on Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2024, in Las Vegas. Prosecutors say that Smirnov, who is charged with making up a multimillion-dollar bribery scheme involving President Joe Biden, his son Hunter and a Ukrainian energy company, had contacts with Russian intelligence-affiliated officials. (Bizuayehu Tesfaye/Las Vegas Review-Journal via AP)

  • Copy Link copied

The government’s memorandum in support of detention of Alexander Smirnov is photographed on Wednesday, Feb. 16, 2024. Prosecutors say Smirnov, the former FBI informant charged with making up a multimillion-dollar bribery scheme involving President Joe Biden, his son Hunter and a Ukrainian energy company, had contacts with officials affiliated with Russian intelligence.(AP Photo/Jon Elswick)

FILE - Hunter Biden, son of President Joe Biden, speaks during a news conference outside the U.S. Capitol, Dec. 13, 2023, in Washington. Hunter Biden’s lawyers say claims made by a former FBI informant charged with fabricating a bribery scheme involving the presidential family may have tainted the case against the president’s son.(AP Photo/Mariam Zuhaib, File)

how to find a thesis statement in a newspaper article

WASHINGTON (AP) — The explosive allegations at the center of an impeachment inquiry into President Joe Biden were false, federal prosecutors said, and came from an ex-FBI informant who said he was in touch with Russian intelligence.

The informant, Alexander Smirnov , is “actively peddling new lies that could impact U.S. elections,” federal prosecutors said Wednesday, as they appealed to a judge to keep him behind bars ahead of trial on charges alleging he lied to the FBI about a phony multimillion-dollar bribery scheme involving the Bidens and the Ukrainian energy company Burisma.

Defense attorneys have not directly addressed prosecutors’ claims about Russian intelligence contacts but said they look forward to defending him at trial. Republicans in Congress have distanced themselves from Smirnov’s claims and resisted calls to end the impeachment inquiry.

Here’s a look at what’s known about Smirnov, the case against him and fears about potential effects on U.S. elections:

WHO IS ALEXANDER SMIRNOV?

Smirnov had been an informant since 2010, growing close to an FBI handler he spoke to “nearly every day,” prosecutors said in court documents. He met with Burisma executives starting in the spring of 2017 because the company was interested in buying an American company and making an initial public offering on a US stock exchange, according to court documents.

Hunter Biden, son of U.S. President Joe Biden, talks to reporters at the U.S. Capitol, in Washington, Dec. 13, 2023. Prosecutors say a former FBI informant charged with making up a multimillion-dollar bribery scheme involving President Joe Biden, his son Hunter and a Ukrainian energy company had contacts with officials affiliated with Russian intelligence.(AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)

Prosecutors say he has access to more than $6 million, with some money held in the name of his longtime partner. His recent reports to his handler included the guest lists from parties on mega yachts with Russian oligarchs, prosecutors said.

He holds dual Israeli-US citizenship and lived in Israel for more than a decade, later moving to Los Angeles and finally Las Vegas in 2022, prosecutors said.

WHAT IS HE ACCUSED OF?

Smirnov has been charged with falsely reporting that Burisma executives paid Hunter and Joe Biden $5 million each around 2015 after hiring Hunter Biden to sit on its board and “protect us” from an investigation by the then-Ukrainian prosecutor general. The charges were filed by the Justice Department special counsel who has separately filed gun and tax charges against Hunter Biden.

No evidence has emerged that Joe Biden acted corruptly or accepted bribes in his current role or previous office as vice president.

Smirnov, meanwhile, had only routine business dealings with Burisma, and they did not start until 2017 after the prosecutor general was gone and when Joe Biden was unable to influence U.S. policy since he was out of office, prosecutors said.

Smirnov “expressed bias” against Joe Biden before he made the bribery allegations in June 2020, years after they supposedly occurred, prosecutors said. An FBI field office investigated the allegations and recommended the case be closed in August 2020, according to charging documents.

Smirnov’s defense attorneys have said he is presumed innocent, and they successfully pushed for his release from jail ahead of trial. U.S. Magistrate Judge Daniel Albregts in Las Vegas said Tuesday he was concerned about Smirnov’s access to money but that federal guidelines require him to fashion “the least restrictive conditions” ahead of trial. Prosecutors are appealing that decision.

WHAT TIES ARE THERE TO RUSSIAN INTELLIGENCE?

Prosecutors laid out in court documents “extensive and extremely recent,” contact Smirnov said he had with people aligned with Russian intelligence.

Smirnov had told his FBI handler that he had been in touch with “multiple” other foreign intelligence services, including officials linked to Russian intelligence, according to court documents.

As recently as December, court documents state he was relaying details about meetings with Russian officials, one of whom said the country’s intelligence services had intercepted calls from prominent Americans that “the Russian government may use as ‘kompromat’ in the 2024 election, depending on who the candidates will be,” using a word for compromising material.

That echoed a previous bogus story from months before when he pushed his handler to investigate whether Hunter Biden had been recorded in a Ukrainian hotel, prosecutors said. The president’s son has never traveled to Ukraine, according to court documents.

“What this shows is that the misinformation he is spreading is not confined to 2020. He is actively peddling new lies that could impact U.S. elections after meeting with Russian intelligence officials in November,” prosecutors wrote in court documents.

National security experts have warned for years that foreign governments — primarily Russia, China and Iran — want to undermine the U.S. and see elections as a way to do it.

In a threat assessment late last year, Microsoft warned Russia remains “the most committed and capable threat to the 2024 election,” with the Kremlin seeing next year’s vote as a “must-win political warfare battle” that could determine the outcome of its war against Ukraine.

WHAT ARE REPUBLICANS SAYING?

Smirnov’s claims have been central to the Republican effort in Congress to investigate the president and his family and helped spark what is now a House impeachment inquiry into Biden.

They became a flashpoint in Congress in July as Republicans demanded the FBI release the unredacted form, a so-called FD-1023, documenting the unverified allegations. Republican Rep. James Comer of Kentucky had subpoenaed the form as Republicans deepened their probe ahead of the 2024 presidential election. Republicans acknowledged they couldn’t confirm if the allegations were true but said they were significant in their investigation of Hunter Biden .

The allegations of Russian contact with the source of those allegations should be a death knell for the impeachment inquiry, said Democratic Rep. Jamie Raskin of Maryland. “It appears like the whole thing is not only obviously false and fraudulent but a product of Russian disinformation and propaganda,” he said.

Republicans, on the other hand, have downplayed the importance of Smirnov’s allegations. Judiciary Committee Chairman Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, pointed to Smirnov’s long track record as an FBI source but said the impeachment inquiry goes beyond his allegations. The case against him “doesn’t change the fundamental facts” at issue in the impeachment probe, he said.

Associated Press writers Rio Yamat in Las Vegas, Christina A. Cassidy in Atlanta and video journalist Dan Huff in Washington contributed to this report.

LINDSAY WHITEHURST

Have a language expert improve your writing

Run a free plagiarism check in 10 minutes, generate accurate citations for free.

  • Knowledge Base
  • Working with sources

How to Find Sources | Scholarly Articles, Books, Etc.

Published on June 13, 2022 by Eoghan Ryan . Revised on May 31, 2023.

It’s important to know how to find relevant sources when writing a  research paper , literature review , or systematic review .

The types of sources you need will depend on the stage you are at in the research process , but all sources that you use should be credible , up to date, and relevant to your research topic.

There are three main places to look for sources to use in your research:

Research databases

  • Your institution’s library
  • Other online resources

Table of contents

Library resources, other online sources, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about finding sources.

You can search for scholarly sources online using databases and search engines like Google Scholar . These provide a range of search functions that can help you to find the most relevant sources.

If you are searching for a specific article or book, include the title or the author’s name. Alternatively, if you’re just looking for sources related to your research problem , you can search using keywords. In this case, it’s important to have a clear understanding of the scope of your project and of the most relevant keywords.

Databases can be general (interdisciplinary) or subject-specific.

  • You can use subject-specific databases to ensure that the results are relevant to your field.
  • When using a general database or search engine, you can still filter results by selecting specific subjects or disciplines.

Example: JSTOR discipline search filter

Filtering by discipline

Check the table below to find a database that’s relevant to your research.

Google Scholar

To get started, you might also try Google Scholar , an academic search engine that can help you find relevant books and articles. Its “Cited by” function lets you see the number of times a source has been cited. This can tell you something about a source’s credibility and importance to the field.

Example: Google Scholar “Cited by” function

Google Scholar cited by function

Boolean operators

Boolean operators can also help to narrow or expand your search.

Boolean operators are words and symbols like AND , OR , and NOT that you can use to include or exclude keywords to refine your results. For example, a search for “Nietzsche NOT nihilism” will provide results that include the word “Nietzsche” but exclude results that contain the word “nihilism.”

Many databases and search engines have an advanced search function that allows you to refine results in a similar way without typing the Boolean operators manually.

Example: Project Muse advanced search

Project Muse advanced search

Scribbr Citation Checker New

The AI-powered Citation Checker helps you avoid common mistakes such as:

  • Missing commas and periods
  • Incorrect usage of “et al.”
  • Ampersands (&) in narrative citations
  • Missing reference entries

how to find a thesis statement in a newspaper article

You can find helpful print sources in your institution’s library. These include:

  • Journal articles
  • Encyclopedias
  • Newspapers and magazines

Make sure that the sources you consult are appropriate to your research.

You can find these sources using your institution’s library database. This will allow you to explore the library’s catalog and to search relevant keywords. You can refine your results using Boolean operators .

Once you have found a relevant print source in the library:

  • Consider what books are beside it. This can be a great way to find related sources, especially when you’ve found a secondary or tertiary source instead of a primary source .
  • Consult the index and bibliography to find the bibliographic information of other relevant sources.

You can consult popular online sources to learn more about your topic. These include:

  • Crowdsourced encyclopedias like Wikipedia

You can find these sources using search engines. To refine your search, use Boolean operators in combination with relevant keywords.

However, exercise caution when using online sources. Consider what kinds of sources are appropriate for your research and make sure the sites are credible .

Look for sites with trusted domain extensions:

  • URLs that end with .edu are educational resources.
  • URLs that end with .gov are government-related resources.
  • DOIs often indicate that an article is published in a peer-reviewed , scientific article.

Other sites can still be used, but you should evaluate them carefully and consider alternatives.

If you want to know more about ChatGPT, AI tools , citation , and plagiarism , make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples.

  • ChatGPT vs human editor
  • ChatGPT citations
  • Is ChatGPT trustworthy?
  • Using ChatGPT for your studies
  • What is ChatGPT?
  • Chicago style
  • Paraphrasing

 Plagiarism

  • Types of plagiarism
  • Self-plagiarism
  • Avoiding plagiarism
  • Academic integrity
  • Consequences of plagiarism
  • Common knowledge

Prevent plagiarism. Run a free check.

You can find sources online using databases and search engines like Google Scholar . Use Boolean operators or advanced search functions to narrow or expand your search.

For print sources, you can use your institution’s library database. This will allow you to explore the library’s catalog and to search relevant keywords.

It is important to find credible sources and use those that you can be sure are sufficiently scholarly .

  • Consult your institute’s library to find out what books, journals, research databases, and other types of sources they provide access to.
  • Look for books published by respected academic publishing houses and university presses, as these are typically considered trustworthy sources.
  • Look for journals that use a peer review process. This means that experts in the field assess the quality and credibility of an article before it is published.

When searching for sources in databases, think of specific keywords that are relevant to your topic , and consider variations on them or synonyms that might be relevant.

Once you have a clear idea of your research parameters and key terms, choose a database that is relevant to your research (e.g., Medline, JSTOR, Project MUSE).

Find out if the database has a “subject search” option. This can help to refine your search. Use Boolean operators to combine your keywords, exclude specific search terms, and search exact phrases to find the most relevant sources.

There are many types of sources commonly used in research. These include:

You’ll likely use a variety of these sources throughout the research process , and the kinds of sources you use will depend on your research topic and goals.

Scholarly sources are written by experts in their field and are typically subjected to peer review . They are intended for a scholarly audience, include a full bibliography, and use scholarly or technical language. For these reasons, they are typically considered credible sources .

Popular sources like magazines and news articles are typically written by journalists. These types of sources usually don’t include a bibliography and are written for a popular, rather than academic, audience. They are not always reliable and may be written from a biased or uninformed perspective, but they can still be cited in some contexts.

Cite this Scribbr article

If you want to cite this source, you can copy and paste the citation or click the “Cite this Scribbr article” button to automatically add the citation to our free Citation Generator.

Ryan, E. (2023, May 31). How to Find Sources | Scholarly Articles, Books, Etc.. Scribbr. Retrieved February 22, 2024, from https://www.scribbr.com/working-with-sources/finding-sources/

Is this article helpful?

Eoghan Ryan

Eoghan Ryan

Other students also liked, types of sources explained | examples & tips, primary vs. secondary sources | difference & examples, boolean operators | quick guide, examples & tips.

  • Skip to main content
  • Keyboard shortcuts for audio player

N.Y.'s crusading attorney general wins again with NRA verdict, Trump judgment

Headshot of Brian Mann

Letitia James promised to "take on" then-President Donald Trump when she ran for New York attorney general in 2018. In the years since, she has sued Trump repeatedly, sparking controversy and winning major victories in court. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

Letitia James promised to "take on" then-President Donald Trump when she ran for New York attorney general in 2018. In the years since, she has sued Trump repeatedly, sparking controversy and winning major victories in court.

It was another day of eye-popping courtroom victories for New York state Attorney General Letitia James on Friday.

A jury in Manhattan found top executives of the National Rifle Association liable after a six-week corruption lawsuit that she brought against the men.

Two of the NRA's leaders, Wayne LaPierre and Wilson Phillips, have been ordered to repay roughly $6.4 million dollars between them. Their attorneys say they will appeal.

"This verdict is a major victory for the people of New York and our efforts to stop the corruption and greed at the NRA," James said in a statement.

Just hours earlier a state judge in New York City finalized a ruling in another case brought by James, ordering former President Donald Trump to pay a total of $454 million in penalties linked to fraud allegations. He has 30 days to appeal.

"Donald Trump may have authored The Art of the Deal , but he perfected the art of the steal," James said at a news conference last Friday after the ruling against Trump was issued.

She then took a shot at Trump's character: "The scale and the scope of Donald Trump's fraud is staggering and so too is his ego and his belief that the rules do not apply to him."

Once little known outside New York City, now taking on national figures

James, 65, is a Democrat who made history as the first Black woman to serve as New York's attorney general.

A Brooklyn native and a graduate of Howard University School of Law, she wasn't widely known outside New York City, where she served on the City Council and later in the largely ceremonial role of public advocate.

But after just five years as New York state's attorney general, James has built a reputation as a giant-slayer, targeting — and in some cases, toppling — some of the most powerful figures and organizations in the United States.

  • In 2019, when Trump was still in the White House, she pursued a lawsuit against his charitable operation, accusing him of misusing donations. She prevailed, forcing Trump to shut down his Trump Foundation and pay a $2 million fine.
  • Her corruption lawsuit against the National Rifle Association , filed in 2020 pushed the once-mighty gun rights group to the brink of insolvency. Longtime NRA CEO Wayne LaPierre, once a towering figure in American politics, stepped down in January on the eve of the trial, citing health concerns. "LaPierre's resignation validates our claims against him, but it will not insulate him or the NRA from accountability," James said last month in a statement. A jury found Friday that he's caused more than $5.4 million dollars in harm to the gun group.
  • Her office's 2021 probe of sexual harassment allegations produced a damning report that is widely credited with forcing the resignation of Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo, who denied any wrongdoing. "Today closes a sad chapter for all of New York," James said in a statement after Cuomo announced he would step aside, "but it's an important step towards justice."

how to find a thesis statement in a newspaper article

In August 2021, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo prepares to board a helicopter after announcing his resignation. Sexual harassment allegations cost Cuomo his job. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

In August 2021, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo prepares to board a helicopter after announcing his resignation. Sexual harassment allegations cost Cuomo his job.

  • Her recent victory against Trump and two of his sons, Donald Jr. and Eric, is clearly her largest to date, raising questions about the future of the real estate empire that helped shape Trump's public identity. In addition to the hefty financial penalty, Trump is banned from doing business in New York state for three years; his sons, for two years. They have promised to appeal.

While her track record taking on and winning big cases has won James accolades, it has also drawn criticism.

how to find a thesis statement in a newspaper article

Former President Donald Trump holds up a copy of a story featuring New York Attorney General Letitia James at a news conference this January. Trump has accused James of targeting him unfairly. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

Former President Donald Trump holds up a copy of a story featuring New York Attorney General Letitia James at a news conference this January. Trump has accused James of targeting him unfairly.

Trump and his allies have long claimed her choice of targets reflects bias on the part of an ambitious Democratic politician.

"We have a totally corrupt attorney general," Trump said during a news conference February 16th at his Mar-a-Lago property in Palm Beach, Fla., and he promised to appeal.

"She campaigned on the fact that 'I will get Trump, I will get Trump.' Everybody's seen it," Trump added.

James campaigned promising to "take on" Trump

Indeed, Trump's accusation that James is part of a political "witch hunt" is fueled in part by her own campaign rhetoric.

When James ran for attorney general in 2018, Trump was still in the White House. She made it clear to voters that he was in her crosshairs.

In one campaign video , James promised to "take on President Donald Trump and anyone who tries to deny New Yorkers their most basic rights."

how to find a thesis statement in a newspaper article

New York Attorney General Letitia James attends former President Donald Trump's civil business fraud trial in October. Curtis Means/AP hide caption

New York Attorney General Letitia James attends former President Donald Trump's civil business fraud trial in October.

"I'm running for attorney general because I will never be afraid to challenge this illegitimate president," James said in another campaign video .

After winning office, James gave an interview to NBC News in December 2018 where she promised to "use every area of the law to investigate President Trump and his business transactions and that of his family as well."

She did as promised.

During her first year in office, James successfully pursued her first civil lawsuit against Trump , filed initially by her predecessor, alleging he misused donations given to his charitable organization. Trump paid $2 million and his foundation was dissolved.

"These damages speak to the president's abuse of power," James said in a statement , adding that "no one is above the law ... not even the president of the United States."

Despite agreeing to portions of the settlement, Trump fired back , denying wrongdoing and complaining he was being "attacked by the political hacks in New York State."

In September 2022, James sued Trump again , this time on the fraud charges that led to last week's jaw-dropping penalties.

During a news conference announcing the lawsuit, James acknowledged she would face criticism that her lawsuit is partisan.

She said her investigation of Trump's business dealings "only started after Michael Cohen, his former lawyer, testified before Congress about this conduct."

"We have produced evidence about the scope, the scale, the depth, the breadth of the illegality, the fraud that personally enriched Donald Trump and his family," James said.

Trump again blasted James, using a racially charged nickname and accusing her in a post on his Truth Social site of being a "fraud who campaigned on a 'get Trump' platform."

how to find a thesis statement in a newspaper article

The ruling won by New York Attorney General Letitia James bars Donald Trump from doing business in New York state for three years. It's not yet clear how that will affect his prize real estate assets. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

The ruling won by New York Attorney General Letitia James bars Donald Trump from doing business in New York state for three years. It's not yet clear how that will affect his prize real estate assets.

Attacks against James amplified by right-wing media

Conservative media have amplified claims by Trump, who faces dozens of criminal charges in four separate cases, that he is being attacked unfairly by Democratic prosecutors, including James, as part of an effort to cripple him politically.

In Manhattan, Trump faces a criminal trial, brought by District Attorney Alvin Bragg, a Democrat, linked to allegedly illegal hush money payments.

Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis, also a Democrat, is pursuing criminal charges against Trump linked to allegations that he tried to overturn the 2020 presidential election results in Georgia.

Trump also faces federal charges linked to alleged election interference and charges that he improperly handled classified documents after leaving the White House.

"They're going in with a predetermined agenda and making that a campaign promise," said Fox News personality Sean Hannity in October on the TV channel. "Does that sound like justice?"

Speaking on Hannity's program, George Washington University law professor Jonathan Turley echoed the concern that James, in particular, acted improperly.

"When James was running for office, I wrote that I thought there were serious ethical problems with a prosecutor really trying to secure office on the pledge to nail one person," Turley said. "This a trophy pledge that 'I'm going to bag Donald Trump.'"

how to find a thesis statement in a newspaper article

In this image taken from video, Donald Trump sits for a deposition on April 13, 2023, where the former president came face-to-face with New York Attorney General Letitia James. Office of the New York State Attorney General/AP hide caption

In this image taken from video, Donald Trump sits for a deposition on April 13, 2023, where the former president came face-to-face with New York Attorney General Letitia James.

This month, a close Trump ally, Rep. Elise Stefanik, R-N.Y., filed an ethics complaint against James .

"Ms. James has displayed a personal vendetta against President Trump that renders her unable to impartially handle cases," Stefanik said.

Members of Andrew Cuomo's inner circle have also accused James of bias, saying she used her office's sexual harassment probe to force him out of office.

"It's all about what serves [Letitia] James," said Rich Azzopardi, a longtime Democratic operative in New York and an adviser to Cuomo. "It has nothing to do with the responsibilities of the office. I've never seen a more political attorney general."

James did briefly run for governor after Cuomo's resignation, but her campaign faltered. She withdrew from the governor's race and instead won a second term as state attorney general in November 2022.

"This case has never been about politics"

James didn't accept NPR's repeated requests for an interview for this story.

In public appearances, however, she has addressed accusations that her lawsuits against Trump are political.

"This case has never been about politics or personal vendettas or about name-calling," James said last year. "This case is about the facts and the law."

Christina Greer, a political scientist at the City College of New York who has studied James' career, said it's common for prosecutors to take firm public positions, sometimes controversial ones, on policy and the law.

"It's an elected position. Isn't there always going to be politics for an elected position? I mean, she has to have a point of view."

Greer noted that James' lawsuits are all tested in court, before judges or juries. Powerful defendants, typically represented by top-tier legal teams, have the opportunity to prove that cases are flawed or biased.

Instead, James continues to prevail.

"She's able to take on these very high-powered men, Democrats and Republicans alike, because she also had a very dedicated team of lawyers [who build strong cases]," Greer said.

Court rejects NRA's "witch hunt" claim

how to find a thesis statement in a newspaper article

Wayne LaPierre arrives at court in Lower Manhattan in January. LaPierre resigned as CEO of the National Rifle Association on the eve of the corruption trial against the organization. He has denied any wrongdoing. Yuki Iwamura/AP hide caption

Wayne LaPierre arrives at court in Lower Manhattan in January. LaPierre resigned as CEO of the National Rifle Association on the eve of the corruption trial against the organization. He has denied any wrongdoing.

Attorneys for the NRA, too, attempted to argue in court that James' lawsuit was politically motivated.

The gun group claimed repeatedly in legal filings that James' lawsuit was politically motivated, part of a "witch hunt" designed to weaken and silence a conservative advocacy group.

In 2022, however, state Judge Joel Cohen rejected the NRA's argument of political bias and allowed the case to move forward.

"There are no factual allegations [by the NRA] suggesting that the stated concerns driving the investigation – reports of fraud, waste, and looting within the NRA – were imaginary or not believed by the Attorney General," Cohen wrote.

On Friday, a jury again validated a complex civil case brought by James and her team, finding that LaPierre and others leading the NRA violated their duty to manage the non-profit ethically.

"We will not hesitate to pursue justice against any individual or organization that violates our laws or our trust, no matter how powerful they are," James said in a statement.

  • Letitia James
  • Wayne LaPierre
  • Donald Trump

Mobile Menu Overlay

The White House 1600 Pennsylvania Ave NW Washington, DC 20500

FACT SHEET: President   Biden Cancels Student Debt for more than 150,000 Student Loan Borrowers Ahead of   Schedule

Today, President Biden announced the approval of $1.2 billion in student debt cancellation for almost 153,000 borrowers currently enrolled in the Saving on a Valuable Education (SAVE) repayment plan. The Biden-Harris Administration has now approved nearly $138 billion in student debt cancellation for almost 3.9 million borrowers through more than two dozen executive actions. The borrowers receiving relief are the first to benefit from a SAVE plan policy that provides debt forgiveness to borrowers who have been in repayment after as little as 10 years and took out $12,000 or less in student loans. Originally planned for July, the Biden-Harris Administration implemented this provision of SAVE and is providing relief to borrowers nearly six months ahead of schedule.

From Day One of his Administration, President Biden vowed to fix the student loan system and make sure higher education is a pathway to the middle class – not a barrier to opportunity. Already, the President has cancelled more student debt than any President in history – delivering lifechanging relief to students and families – and has created the most affordable student loan repayment plan ever: the SAVE plan. While Republicans in Congress and their allies try to block President Biden every step of the way, the Biden-Harris Administration continues to cancel student debt for millions of borrowers, and is leaving no stone unturned in the fight to give more borrowers breathing room on their student loans.

Thanks to the Biden-Harris Administration’s SAVE plan, starting today, the Administration will be cancelling debt for borrowers who are enrolled in the SAVE plan, have been in repayment for at least 10 years and took out $12,000 or less in loans for college. For every additional $1,000 a borrower initially borrowed, they will receive relief after an additional year of payments. For example, a borrower enrolled in SAVE who took out $14,000 or less in federal loans to earn an associate’s degree in biotechnology would receive full debt relief starting this week if they have been in repayment for 12 years. The U.S. Department of Education (Department) identified nearly 153,000 borrowers who are enrolled in SAVE plan who will have their debt cancelled starting this week, and those borrowers will receive an email today from President Biden informing them of their imminent relief. Next week, the Department of Education will also be reaching out directly to borrowers who are eligible for early relief but not currently enrolled in the SAVE Plan to encourage them to enroll as soon as possible. This shortened time to forgiveness will particularly help community college and other borrowers with smaller loans and put many on track to being free of student debt faster than ever before. Under the Biden-Harris Administration’s SAVE plan, 85 percent of future community college borrowers will be debt free within 10 years. The Department will continue to regularly identify and discharge other borrowers eligible for relief under this provision on SAVE. Over four million borrowers have a $0 monthly payment under the SAVE Plan Last year, President Biden launched the SAVE plan – the most affordable repayment plan ever. Under the SAVE plan, monthly payments are based on a borrower’s income and family size, not their loan balance. The SAVE plan ensures that if borrowers are making their monthly payments, their balances cannot grow because of unpaid interest. And, starting in July, undergraduate loan payments will be cut in half, capping a borrower’s loan payment at 5% of their discretionary income. Already, 7.5 million borrowers are enrolled in the SAVE Plan, and 4.3 million borrowers have a $0 monthly payment.  

Today, the White House Council of Economic Advisers released an issue brief highlighting how low and middle-income borrowers enrolled in SAVE could see significant saving in terms of interest saved over time and principal forgiven as a result of SAVE’s early forgiveness provisions.

how to find a thesis statement in a newspaper article

President Biden’s Administration has approved student debt relief for nearly 3.9 million Americans through various actions

Today’s announcement builds on the Biden-Harris Administration’s track record of taking historic action to cancel student debt for millions of borrowers. Since taking office, the Biden-Harris Administration has approved debt cancellation for nearly 3.9 million Americans, totaling almost $138 billion in debt relief through various actions. This relief has given borrowers critical breathing room in their daily lives, allowing them to afford other expenses, buy homes, start businesses, or pursue dreams they had to put on hold because of the burden of student loan debt. President Biden remains committed to providing debt relief to as many borrowers as possible, and won’t stop fighting to deliver relief to more Americans.

The Biden-Harris Administration has also taken historic steps to improve the student loan program and make higher education more affordable for more Americans, including:

  • Achieving the largest increases in Pell Grants in over a decade to help families who earn less than $60,000 a year achieve their higher-education goals.
  • Fixing the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program so that borrowers who go into public service get the debt relief they’re entitled to under the law. Before President Biden took office, only 7,000 people ever received debt relief through PSLF. After fixing the program, the Biden-Harris Administration has now cancelled student loan debt for nearly 800,000 public service workers.
  • Cancelling student loan debt for more than 930,000 borrowers who have been in repayment for over 20 years but never got the relief they earned because of administrative failures with Income-Driven Repayment Plans.
  • Pursuing an alternative path to deliver student debt relief to as many borrowers as possible in the wake of the Supreme Court’s decision striking down the Administration’s original debt relief plan. Last week, the Department of Education released proposed regulatory text to cancel student debt for borrowers who are experiencing hardship paying back their student loans, and late last year released proposals to cancel student debt for borrowers who: owe more than they borrowed, first entered repayment 20 or 25 years ago, attended low quality programs, and who would be eligible for loan forgiveness through income-driven repayment programs like SAVE but have not applied.
  • Holding colleges accountable for leaving students with unaffordable debts.

It’s easy to enroll in SAVE. Borrowers should go to studentaid.gov/save to start saving.  

Stay Connected

We'll be in touch with the latest information on how President Biden and his administration are working for the American people, as well as ways you can get involved and help our country build back better.

Opt in to send and receive text messages from President Biden.

  • Pre-Markets
  • U.S. Markets
  • Cryptocurrency
  • Futures & Commodities
  • Funds & ETFs
  • Health & Science
  • Real Estate
  • Transportation
  • Industrials

Small Business

Personal Finance

  • Financial Advisors
  • Options Action
  • Buffett Archive
  • Trader Talk
  • Cybersecurity
  • Social Media
  • CNBC Disruptor 50
  • White House
  • Equity and Opportunity
  • Business Day Shows
  • Entertainment Shows
  • Full Episodes
  • Latest Video
  • CEO Interviews
  • CNBC Documentaries
  • CNBC Podcasts
  • Digital Originals
  • Live TV Schedule
  • Trust Portfolio
  • Trade Alerts
  • Meeting Videos
  • Homestretch
  • Jim's Columns
  • Stock Screener
  • Market Forecast
  • Options Investing
  • Chart Investing

Credit Cards

Credit Monitoring

Help for Low Credit Scores

All Credit Cards

Find the Credit Card for You

Best Credit Cards

Best Rewards Credit Cards

Best Travel Credit Cards

Best 0% APR Credit Cards

Best Balance Transfer Credit Cards

Best Cash Back Credit Cards

Best Credit Card Welcome Bonuses

Best Credit Cards to Build Credit

Find the Best Personal Loan for You

Best Personal Loans

Best Debt Consolidation Loans

Best Loans to Refinance Credit Card Debt

Best Loans with Fast Funding

Best Small Personal Loans

Best Large Personal Loans

Best Personal Loans to Apply Online

Best Student Loan Refinance

All Banking

Find the Savings Account for You

Best High Yield Savings Accounts

Best Big Bank Savings Accounts

Best Big Bank Checking Accounts

Best No Fee Checking Accounts

No Overdraft Fee Checking Accounts

Best Checking Account Bonuses

Best Money Market Accounts

Best Credit Unions

All Mortgages

Best Mortgages

Best Mortgages for Small Down Payment

Best Mortgages for No Down Payment

Best Mortgages with No Origination Fee

Best Mortgages for Average Credit Score

Adjustable Rate Mortgages

Affording a Mortgage

All Insurance

Best Life Insurance

Best Homeowners Insurance

Best Renters Insurance

Best Car Insurance

Travel Insurance

All Credit Monitoring

Best Credit Monitoring Services

Best Identity Theft Protection

How to Boost Your Credit Score

Credit Repair Services

All Personal Finance

Best Budgeting Apps

Best Expense Tracker Apps

Best Money Transfer Apps

Best Resale Apps and Sites

Buy Now Pay Later (BNPL) Apps

Best Debt Relief

All Small Business

Best Small Business Savings Accounts

Best Small Business Checking Accounts

Best Credit Cards for Small Business

Best Small Business Loans

Best Tax Software for Small Business

Filing For Free

Best Tax Software

Best Tax Software for Small Businesses

Tax Refunds

Tax Brackets

Tax By State

Tax Payment Plans

All Help for Low Credit Scores

Best Credit Cards for Bad Credit

Best Personal Loans for Bad Credit

Best Debt Consolidation Loans for Bad Credit

Personal Loans if You Don't Have Credit

Best Credit Cards for Building Credit

Personal Loans for 580 Credit Score or Lower

Personal Loans for 670 Credit Score or Lower

Best Mortgages for Bad Credit

Best Hardship Loans

All Investing

Best IRA Accounts

Best Roth IRA Accounts

Best Investing Apps

Best Free Stock Trading Platforms

Best Robo-Advisors

Index Funds

Mutual Funds

AT&T cellular service restored after daylong outage; cause still unknown

thumbnail

  • A cellular outage Thursday hit thousands of AT&T users in the United States, disrupting calls and text messages as well as emergency services in major cities including San Francisco.

About 58,000 incidents were reported around noon ET, according to data from outage-tracking website Downdetector.com.

  • Shares of AT&T were down about 2% Thursday following the outages.

In this article

A cellular outage Thursday hit thousands of AT&T users in the United States, disrupting calls and text messages as well as emergency services in major cities including San Francisco. The company said service was restored to all affected customers shortly after 3 p.m. ET.

"Keeping our customers connected remains our top priority, and we are taking steps to ensure our customers do not experience this again in the future," the company said in a statement.

AT&T said late Thursday that based on an initial review, the outage was "caused by the application and execution of an incorrect process used as we were expanding our network, not a cyber attack." The company will continue to assess the outage.

AT&T, which put up a website for system updates , did not say how many customers were affected by Thursday's outage. The FCC said on X that it was investigating the incident and was in contact with AT&T and safety authorities .

Shares of AT&T closed 2.41% lower Thursday.

Phones affected by the outage displayed zero service bars in the top right corner of the device or the letters SOS. Customers were still able to make calls by enabling Wi-Fi calling.

A spike in outages began around 4:00 a.m. ET and peaked at around 74,000 reported incidents at 8:30 a.m. ET, according to Downdetector.

The AT&T outage affected people's ability to reach emergency services by dialing 911, a post on social media platform X from the San Francisco Fire Department said.

"We are aware of an issue impacting AT&T wireless customers from making and receiving any phone calls (including to 911)," the fire department said.

Atlanta Mayor Andre Dickens said in a post on X that the city could receive and make outbound 911 calls but that AT&T customers in the area had reported issues.

"We have received calls from AT&T customers that their cellular phones are in SOS mode. Please direct all inquiries to restore service to AT&T," Dickens said.

The Massachusetts State Police said that people were flooding their 911 center with calls trying to determine if the service worked from their cell phones.

"Please do not do this. If you can successfully place a non-emergency call to another number via your cell service then your 911 service will also work," the state police said in a post on X.

Users of Verizon and T-Mobile reported a few thousand outages each as of 10:00 a.m. ET, according to Downdetector.

The reports were likely due to calls made trying to connect with other networks, both companies said.

"Downdetector is likely reflecting challenges our customers were having attempting to connect to users on other networks," T-Mobile said in an emailed statement.

– Reuters, CNBC's Steven Kopack and Chris Eudaily contributed to this report.

comscore

IMAGES

  1. How to Write a Thesis Statement: Fill-in-the-Blank Formula

    how to find a thesis statement in a newspaper article

  2. How To Write A Thesis Statement (with Useful Steps and Tips) • 7ESL

    how to find a thesis statement in a newspaper article

  3. 10 Proven Steps: How to Find the Thesis of an Article

    how to find a thesis statement in a newspaper article

  4. 25 Thesis Statement Examples (2024)

    how to find a thesis statement in a newspaper article

  5. 10 Easy Steps: How to Find Thesis in an Article

    how to find a thesis statement in a newspaper article

  6. Parts of a Scholarly Article

    how to find a thesis statement in a newspaper article

VIDEO

  1. Find your thesis statement!! #contentcreator #2023 #mississippi

  2. How to Write a Thesis Statement

  3. How to Write a THESIS Statement

  4. Thesis Statement and Its Arguments

  5. What is Thesis Statement? Writing Thesis Statement with Practice in Urdu/Hindi #researchmethodology

  6. How To Write A Thesis Statement

COMMENTS

  1. Identifying Thesis Statements, Claims, and Evidence

    Each paragraph in the article is numbered at the beginning of the first sentence. Paragraphs 1-7. Identifying the Thesis Statement. Paragraph 2 ends with this thesis statement: "People's prior convictions should not be held against them in their pursuit of higher learning." It is a thesis statement for three reasons:

  2. 10 Proven Ways to Find the Thesis Statement in an Article

    Look for the Introduction The introduction of an article often contains the thesis statement. It is typically found in the first paragraph or two and sets the tone for the rest of the piece. Pay close attention to any sentences that express the main idea or argument. Identifying the Thesis Statement in the Introduction

  3. Identifying Thesis Statements

    Topic Sentences We've learned that a thesis statement conveys the primary message of an entire piece of text. Now, let's look at the next level of important sentences in a piece of text: topic sentences in each paragraph.

  4. How to Write a Thesis Statement

    Step 1: Start with a question Step 2: Write your initial answer Step 3: Develop your answer Step 4: Refine your thesis statement Types of thesis statements Other interesting articles Frequently asked questions about thesis statements What is a thesis statement? A thesis statement summarizes the central points of your essay.

  5. Thesis Statements

    directly answers the question asked of you. A thesis is an interpretation of a question or subject, not the subject itself. The subject, or topic, of an essay might be World War II or Moby Dick; a thesis must then offer a way to understand the war or the novel. makes a claim that others might dispute.

  6. 5.2: Identifying Thesis Statements and Topic Sentences

    EXERCISE 1: Identify the Topic and Focus. Self-Check. Being able to identify the purpose and thesis of a text, as you're reading it, takes practice. This section will offer you that practice. One fun strategy for developing a deeper understanding the material you're reading is to make a visual "map" of the ideas.

  7. How to Write a Thesis Statement

    1 Brainstorm the best topic for your essay. You can't write a thesis statement until you know what your paper is about, so your first step is choosing a topic. If the topic is already assigned, great! That's all for this step. If not, consider the tips below for choosing the topic that's best for you:

  8. Academic Guides: Writing a Paper: Thesis Statements

    When drafting your thesis statement, avoid words like explore, investigate, learn, compile, summarize, and explain to describe the main purpose of your paper. These words imply a paper that summarizes or "reports," rather than synthesizing and analyzing. Instead of the terms above, try words like argue, critique, question, and interrogate.

  9. Creating a Thesis Statement, Thesis Statement Tips

    Tips for Writing Your Thesis Statement. 1. Determine what kind of paper you are writing: An analytical paper breaks down an issue or an idea into its component parts, evaluates the issue or idea, and presents this breakdown and evaluation to the audience.; An expository (explanatory) paper explains something to the audience.; An argumentative paper makes a claim about a topic and justifies ...

  10. How to write a thesis statement + Examples

    A good thesis statement needs to do the following: Condense the main idea of your thesis into one or two sentences. Answer your project's main research question. Clearly state your position in relation to the topic. Make an argument that requires support or evidence.

  11. Thesis statement: Tips and Examples

    1. Keep it Concise. The statement should be short and precise. It should contain no more than a couple of sentences. 2. Make it Specific. The statement should be focused on a specific topic or argument. Covering too many topics will only make your paper weaker. 3.

  12. Strong Thesis Statements

    Although the scope of your paper might seem overwhelming at the start, generally the narrower the thesis the more effective your argument will be. Your thesis or claim must be supported by evidence. The broader your claim is, the more evidence you will need to convince readers that your position is right. Example of a thesis that is too broad:

  13. What Is a Thesis?

    A thesis is a type of research paper based on your original research. It is usually submitted as the final step of a master's program or a capstone to a bachelor's degree. Writing a thesis can be a daunting experience. Other than a dissertation, it is one of the longest pieces of writing students typically complete.

  14. 10 Proven Steps: How to Find the Thesis of an Article

    SEO Blog By Asim Akhtar (CEO) 10 Proven Steps: How to Find the Thesis of an Article - Guide 2024 Here are 10 important statistics about finding the thesis of an article: Over 80% of readers struggle to identify the thesis of an article. Only 20% of readers actively look for the thesis statement.

  15. How to Write a Thesis Statement in 4 Steps

    Written by MasterClass Last updated: Sep 14, 2022 • 3 min read If you produce a solid thesis statement to kick off an argumentative essay or piece of academic writing, you instantly frame the objective for yourself as a writer and for your audience as readers.

  16. How to Write a Thesis Statement for an Article Critique

    For example: the original author's main point, their main emphases in the article, and the strengths and the weaknesses of the article. These points will comprise the main points you will be making in the article and the potential ideas that will make up your thesis statement. Connect the main points from Step 1 into your concise argument or ...

  17. How to Cite a Newspaper in APA Style

    Online-only news sites Don't use the newspaper citation format for articles on news sites, such as Reuters and BBC News, that are not linked to a print newspaper. Instead, use the format of a website citation. The article title is italicized, and the name of the site is written in plain text. This article reflects the APA 7th edition guidelines.

  18. Thesis Statement Finder: Tool for Students

    🔗 References 👌 Thesis Statement Finder: 4 Benefits This thesis statement finder works for any essay type (argumentative, analytical, compare-and-contrast, or informative ). You can specify it for a better result. Besides, the program offers a thesis example specifically for each genre. It is intuitively clear.

  19. Identifying Thesis Statements

    Topic Sentences. We've learned that a thesis statement conveys the primary message of an entire piece of text. Now, let's look at the next level of important sentences in a piece of text: topic sentences in each paragraph. A useful metaphor would be to think of the thesis statement of a text as a general: it controls all the major decisions of the writing.

  20. How to Find Newspaper Articles: From A Specific Newspaper

    Google News Archive Search; Note: if you find an online newspaper that allows free searching, but doesn't provide the full text of the article for free, don't pay for the article. If it provides the full citation (article title, newspaper title, date, page numbers), use request a scan through interlibrary loan. Use a newspaper index

  21. NVIDIA Announces Financial Results for Fourth Quarter and Fiscal 2024

    Record quarterly revenue of $22.1 billion, up 22% from Q3, up 265% from year ago Record quarterly Data Center revenue of $18.4 billion, up 27% from Q3, up 409% from year ago Record full-year revenue of $60.9 billion, up 126% SANTA CLARA, Calif., Feb. 21, 2024 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) - NVIDIA (NASDAQ: NVDA) today reported revenue for the fourth quarter ended January 28, 2024, of $22.1 billion, up 22% ...

  22. UnitedHealth Group's Change Healthcare Experiencing Cyberattack that

    Change Healthcare, which is one of the largest health care technology companies in the United States, Feb. 21 was hit with a cyberattack that began disrupting a number of its systems and services, according to published reports and a statement posted on Change Healthcare's website. "Change Healthcare is experiencing a cyber security issue, and our experts are working to address the matter ...

  23. Change Healthcare services disrupted by cyberattack

    A cyberattack Feb. 21 began disrupting systems and services at Change Healthcare, one of the largest health care technology companies in the United States, according to news reports and statements by UnitedHealth Group's Optum unit, which acquired Change Healthcare in 2022. "Change Healthcare is experiencing a cyber security issue, and our experts are working to address the matter," the ...

  24. Here's how an ex-FBI informant charged with lying about Bidens is

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The explosive allegations at the center of an impeachment inquiry into President Joe Biden were false, federal prosecutors said, and came from an ex-FBI informant who said he was in touch with Russian intelligence.. The informant, Alexander Smirnov, is "actively peddling new lies that could impact U.S. elections," federal prosecutors said Wednesday, as they appealed to ...

  25. How to Find Sources

    You can search for scholarly sources online using databases and search engines like Google Scholar. These provide a range of search functions that can help you to find the most relevant sources. If you are searching for a specific article or book, include the title or the author's name.

  26. Letitia James wins against the NRA and Trump in NY court : NPR

    New York Attorney General Letitia James has built a reputation targeting powerful national figures. Critics say her lawsuits are politically motivated, but she keeps winning in court.

  27. FACT SHEET: President Biden Cancels Student Debt for more than 150,000

    Today, President Biden announced the approval of $1.2 billion in student debt cancellation for almost 153,000 borrowers currently enrolled in the Saving on a Valuable Education (SAVE) repayment plan.

  28. AT&T cellular service restored after daylong outage; cause still ...

    A cellular outage Thursday hit thousands of AT&T users in the United States, disrupting calls and text messages as well as emergency services in major cities including San Francisco. The company ...