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Environmental and Water Resource Engineering M.S. & Ph.D.

Research and courses within the Environmental and Water Resources Systems (EWRS) group are concerned with the development and application of quantitative methods for the evaluation, planning and operation of water resource and environmental systems. Efforts address the integration and analysis of engineering and economic-policy issues posed by the need to manage water, land, air and human resources, as well as environmental remediation efforts. The fundamental sciences upon which such analyses are based include hydrology, hydraulics, environmental sciences, biology, and environmental engineering. For this reason, individuals in this area frequently interact with the other environmentally-orientated groups within CEE, as well as with other departments in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

The systems sciences, including operations research, computer science, statistics and risk analysis, economics, and planning provide the integrating analytical methodologies that are used to evaluate environmental issues. By examining engineering, socio-economics, ecology and public policy issues using analytic model-oriented frameworks, we strive to communicate estimates of the impact and risks of alternative decisions to the many possible stakeholders associated with environmental management decisions. Student projects have addressed regional water resources management issues in California, New York State, New Jersey, Mexico, North Africa, Europe, and parts of Asia. Specialized software packages for water resources system simulation, support of negotiations, stochastic streamflow generation and flood frequency analysis have been used around the world. In a time of quantum leaps in computing technology, when local and national governments face tight budgets, and when society as a whole has a desire for economic efficiency and sustainability, an interest in the intelligent use of environmental resources, and a concern for risks to human health, we believe environmental systems engineering is an important and promising area for research and study. To that end we strive to advance the quality and capability of analytical methodologies for environmental management, and to facilitate the application of such techniques to the solution of real problems.

We believe that in collaboration with faculty from a number of fields across the Cornell campus, our research and our course offerings represent one of the strongest environmental systems programs in the country.

Learn more by viewing the  M.S./Ph.D. in EWRS brochure  (pdf). Additional information can be found in this document:  EWRS pamphlet  (pdf).

If you need an accessible copy of these documents contact [email protected]

Faculty in the EWRS area include:

Patrick Reed

DEEP UNCERTAINTY Decision Analysis: An Interactive Exercise

Texas A&M University Catalogs

Doctor of philosophy in water management and hydrological science.

Program Chair:  Thomas McDonald

Program Coordinator:  Raquel Granados Aguilar

The Water Management and Hydrological Science (WMHS) graduate degree program is supervised by an interdisciplinary faculty from multiple department and colleges. The faculty have expertise in the bio-physical, geo-chemical, management, public health, social sciences and engineering fields. The program offers two masters’ degrees (thesis and non-thesis options) and a PhD. The curriculum is designed to allow students to become leaders in their focal areas of water while making connections with colleagues in other related disciplines.

Each student must have a graduate committee chair before being accepted in the program. Students work with their chair and the advisory committee to develop a course of study satisfying the curriculum. A minimum of 64 credit hours beyond a master’s degree, with thesis, is required. Students complete 9 hours of WMHS courses, 18 hours of water courses, one research methods course, two statistics courses, 9 hours or more of free electives and a minimum of 18 credit hours of research.

Graduate research assistantships are available on a competitive basis.

For more information on degree application, course requirements and program advisors go to the website http://waterprogram.tamu.edu .

Work leading to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) is designed to give students a comprehensive knowledge of water science and hydrology and provide training in research methods. The final basis for granting the degree shall be the candidate’s grasp of the subject matter of a broad field of study and a demonstrated ability to do independent research. In addition, the candidate must have acquired the ability to express thoughts clearly and forcefully in both oral and written communication The degree is not granted solely for the completion of coursework, residence and technical requirements, although these must be met.

Steps to Fulfill a Doctoral Program

Program Requirements

  • Student's Advisory Committee

Degree Plan

Transfer of credit, research proposal.

  • Preliminary Examination

Preliminary Examination Format

Preliminary examination scheduling, report of preliminary examination, failure of the preliminary examination, retake of failed preliminary examination.

  • Final Examination

Report of Final Examination

Dissertation, student’s advisory committee.

After receiving admission to graduate studies and enrolling, the student will consult with the head of his or her major or administrative department (or chair of the intercollegiate faculty) concerning appointment of the chair of the advisory committee. The student’s advisory committee will consist of  no fewer than four members of the graduate faculty  representative of the student’s several fields of study and research, where the chair or co-chair must be from the student’s department (or intercollegiate faculty, if applicable), and at least one or more members must have an appointment to a department different from the chair of the student's committee. 

The chair, in consultation with the student, will select the remainder of the advisory committee. Only tenure or tenure-track members of the Graduate Committee Faculty, affiliated with the Water Management and Hydrological Science program, and located on Texas A&M University campuses may serve as chair of a student’s advisory committee. Other graduate faculty members located off-campus may serve as a member or co-chair (but not chair), with a member as the chair. The chair of the committee, who usually has immediate supervision of the student’s degree program, has the responsibility for calling meetings at any other time considered desirable. 

If the chair of a student’s advisory committee voluntarily leaves the University and the student is near completion of the degree and wants the chair to continue to serve in this role, the student is responsible for securing a current member of the University Graduate Faculty, from the student’s academic program and located near the Texas A&M University campus site, to serve as the co-chair of the committee. The Department Head or Chair of Intercollegiate faculty may request in writing to the Associate Provost and Dean of the Graduate and Professional School that a faculty member who is on an approved leave of absence or has voluntarily separated from the university, be allowed to continue to serve in the role of chair of a student’s advisory committee without a co-chair for up to one year. The students should be near completion of the degree. Extensions beyond the one year period can be granted with additional approval of the Dean.

The committee members’ signatures on the degree plan indicate their willingness to accept the responsibility for guiding and directing the entire academic program of the student and for initiating all academic actions concerning the student. Although individual committee members may be replaced by petition for valid reasons, a committee cannot resign  en masse . The chair of the committee, who usually has immediate supervision of the student’s research and dissertation or record of study, has the responsibility for calling all meetings of the committee. The duties of the committee include responsibility for the proposed degree plan, the research proposal, the preliminary examination, the dissertation or record of study and the final examination. In addition, the committee, as a group and as individual members, is responsible for counseling the student on academic matters, and, in the case of academic deficiency, initiating recommendations to the Graduate and Professional School.

The student’s advisory committee will evaluate the student’s previous education and degree objectives. The committee, in consultation with the student, will develop a proposed degree plan and outline a research problem which, when completed, as indicated by the dissertation (or its equivalent for the degree of Doctor of Education or the degree of Doctor of Engineering), will constitute the basic requirements for the degree. The degree plan must be filed with the Graduate and Professional School prior to the deadline imposed by the student’s college and no later than 90 days prior to the preliminary examination.

This proposed degree plan should be submitted through the online Document Processing Submission System located on the website  http://ogsdpss.tamu.edu . A minimum of 64 hours is required on the degree plan for the Doctor of Philosophy for a student who has completed a master’s degree. A student who has completed a DDS/DMD, DVM or a MD at a U.S. institution is also required to complete a minimum of 64 hours. A student who has completed a baccalaureate degree but not a master’s degree will be required to complete a 96-hour degree plan. Completion of a DDS/DMD, DVM or MD degree at a foreign institution requires completion of a minimum of 96 hours for the Doctor of Philosophy. A field of study may be primarily in one department or in a combination of departments. A degree plan must carry a reasonable amount of 691 (research). A maximum of 9 hours of 400-level undergraduate courses may be used toward meeting credit-hour requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy.

Additional coursework may be added by petition to the approved degree plan by the student’s advisory committee if it is deemed necessary to correct deficiencies in the student’s academic preparation. No changes can be made to the degree plan once the student’s Request for Final Examination is approved by the Graduate and Professional School.

Approval to enroll in any professional course (900-level) should be obtained from the head of the department (or Chair of the intercollegiate faculty, if applicable) in which the course will be offered before including such a course on a degree plan.

No credit may be obtained by correspondence study, by extension or for any course of fewer than three weeks duration.

For non-distance degree programs, no more than four courses may be taken by distance education without approval of the Graduate and Professional School and no more than 50 percent of the non-research credit hours required for the program may be completed through distance education courses.

To receive a graduate degree from Texas A&M University, students must earn one-third or more of the credits through the institution’s own direct instruction. This limitation also applies to joint degree programs. 

Courses for which transfer credits are sought must have been completed with a grade of B or greater and must be approved by the student’s advisory committee and the Graduate and Professional School. These courses must not have been used previously for another degree. Except for officially approved cooperative doctoral programs, credit for thesis or dissertation research or the equivalent is not transferable. Credit for “internship” coursework in any form is not transferable. Courses taken in residence at an accredited U.S. institution or approved international institution with a final grade of B or greater will be considered for transfer credit if, at the time the courses were completed, the courses would be accepted for credit toward a similar degree for a student in degree-seeking status at the host institution. Credit for coursework taken by extension is not transferable. Coursework  in which no formal grades are given or in which grades other than letter grades (A or B) are earned (for example, CR, P, S, U, H, etc.) is not accepted for transfer credit . Credit for coursework submitted for transfer from any college or university must be shown in semester credit hours, or equated to semester credit hours.

Courses used toward a degree at another institution may not be applied for graduate credit. If the course to be transferred was taken prior to the conferral of a degree at the transfer institution, a letter from the registrar at that institution stating that the course was not applied for credit toward the degree must be submitted to the Graduate and Professional School.

Grades for courses completed at other institutions are not included in computing the GPA. An official transcript from the university at which transfer courses are taken must be sent directly to the Office of Admissions.

The general field of research to be used for the dissertation should be agreed on by the student and the advisory committee at their first meeting, as a basis for selecting the proper courses to support the proposed research.

As soon thereafter as the research project can be outlined in reasonable detail, the dissertation research proposal should be completed. The research proposal should be approved at a meeting of the student’s advisory committee, at which time the feasibility of the proposed research and the adequacy of available facilities should be reviewed. The approved proposal, signed by all members of the student’s advisory committee, the head of the student’s major department (or chair of the intercollegiate faculty, if applicable), must be submitted to the Graduate and Professional School at least 20 working days prior to the submission of the Request for the Final Examination.

Compliance issues must be addressed if a graduate student is performing research involving human subjects, animals, infectious biohazards and recombinant DNA. A student involved in these types of research should check with the Office of Research Compliance and Biosafety at (979) 458-1467 to address questions about all research compliance responsibilities. Additional information can also be obtained on the website  http:// rcb.tamu.edu .

Examinations

Preliminary examination for doctoral students.

The student’s major department (or chair of the interdisciplinary degree program faculty, if applicable) and his or her advisory committee may require qualifying, cumulative or other types of examinations at any time deemed desirable. These examinations are entirely at the discretion of the department and the student’s advisory committee.

The preliminary examination is required. The preliminary examination for a doctoral student shall be given no earlier than a date at which the student is within 6 credit hours of completion of the formal coursework on the degree plan (i.e., all coursework on the degree plan except 681, 684, 690, 691, 692, 693, 695, 697, 791, or other graduate courses specifically designated as S/U in the course catalog). The student should complete the Preliminary Examination no later than the end of the semester following the completion of the formal coursework on the degree plan.

The objective of preliminary examination is to evaluate whether the student has demonstrated the following qualifications:

a.     a mastery of the subject matter of all fields in the program;

b.     an adequate knowledge of the literature in these fields and an ability to carry out bibliographical research;

c.     an understanding of the research problem and the appropriate methodological approaches.

The format of the preliminary examination shall be determined by the student’s department (or interdisciplinary degree program, if applicable) and advisory committee, and communicated to the student in advance of the examination. The exam may consist of a written component, oral component, or combination of written and oral components.

The preliminary exam may be administered by the advisory committee or a departmental committee; herein referred to as the examination committee.

Regardless of exam format, a student will receive an overall preliminary exam result of pass or fail. The department (or interdisciplinary degree program, if applicable) will determine how the overall pass or fail result is determined based on the exam structure and internal department procedures. If the exam is administered by the advisory committee, each advisory committee member will provide a pass or fail evaluation decision.

Only one advisory committee substitution is allowed to provide an evaluation decision for a student’s preliminary exam, and it cannot be the committee chair.

If a student is required to take, as a part of the preliminary examination, a written component administered by a department or interdisciplinary degree program, the department or interdisciplinary degree program faculty must:

a.     offer the examination at least once every six months. The departmental or interdisciplinary degree program examination should be announced at least 30 days prior to the scheduled examination date.

b.     assume the responsibility for marking the examination satisfactory or unsatisfactory, or otherwise graded, and in the case of unsatisfactory, stating specifically the reasons for such a mark.

c.     forward the marked examination to the chair of the student’s advisory committee within one week after the examination.

Prior to commencing any component of the preliminary examination, a departmental representative or the advisory committee chair will review the eligibility criteria with the student, using the Preliminary Examination Checklist to ensure the student is eligible for the preliminary examination. The following list of eligibility requirements applies.

Student is registered at Texas A&M University for a minimum of one semester credit hour in the long semester or summer term during which any component of the preliminary examination is held. If the entire examination is held between semesters, then the student must be registered for the term immediately preceding the examination.

An approved degree plan is on file with the Graduate and Professional School prior to commencing the first component of the examination.

Student’s cumulative GPA is at least 3.000.

Student’s degree plan GPA is at least 3.000.

At the end of the semester in which at least the first component of the exam is given, there are no more than 6 hours of coursework remaining on the degree plan (except 681, 684, 690, 691, 692, 693, 695, 697, 791, or other graduate courses specifically designated as S/U in the course catalog). The head of the student’s department (or Chair of the Interdisciplinary Degree Program, if applicable) has the authority to approve a waiver of this criterion.

Credit for the preliminary examination is not transferable in cases where a student changes degree programs after passing a preliminary exam.

If a written component precedes an oral component of the preliminary exam, the chair of the student’s examination committee is responsible for making all written examinations available to all members of the committee. A positive evaluation of the preliminary exam by all members of a student’s examination committee with at most one dissension is required to pass a student on his or her preliminary exam.

The student’s department will promptly report the results of the Preliminary Examination to the Graduate and Professional School via the Report of Doctoral Preliminary Examination form. The Preliminary Examination checklist form must also be submitted. These forms should be submitted to the Graduate and Professional School within 10 working days of completion of the preliminary examination.

The Report of the Preliminary Examination form must be submitted with original signatures of the approved examination committee members. If an approved examination committee member substitution (one only) has been made, that signature must also be included, in place of the committee member, on the form submitted to the Graduate and Professional School. The original signature of the department head is also required on the form.

After passing the required preliminary oral and written examinations for a doctoral degree, the student must complete the final examination within four years of the semester in which the preliminary exam is taken. Exams taken in between terms will expire at the end of the term that ended prior to the exam. For example, a preliminary exam taken and passed during the fall 2019 semester will expire at the end of the fall 2023 semester. A preliminary exam taken in the time between the summer and fall 2019 semesters will expire at the end of the summer 2023 semester.

First Failure

Upon approval of a student’s examination committee (with no more than one member dissenting), and approval of the Department and Graduate and Professional School, a student who has failed a preliminary examination may be given one re-examination. In accordance with Student Rule 12.5, the student’s department head or designee, intercollegiate faculty, or graduate advisory committee should make a recommendation to the student regarding their scholastic deficiency.

Second Failure

Upon failing the preliminary exam twice in a doctoral program, a student is no longer eligible to continue to pursue the PhD in that program/major. In accordance with Student Rule 12.5.3 and/or 12.5.4, the student will be notified of the action being taken by the department as a result of the second failure of the preliminary examination.

Adequate time must be given to permit a student to address inadequacies emerging from the first preliminary examination. The examination committee must agree upon and communicate to the student, in writing, an adequate time-frame from the first examination (normally six months) to retest, as well as a detailed explanation of the inadequacies emerging from the examination. The student and committee should jointly negotiate a mutually acceptable date for this retest.  When providing feedback on inadequacies, the committee should clearly document expected improvements that the student must be able to exhibit in order to retake the exam.  The examination committee will document and communicate the time-frame and feedback within 10 working days of the exam that was not passed.

Final Examination for Doctoral Students

The candidate for the doctoral degree must pass a final examination by deadline dates announced in the “Graduate and Professional School Calendar” each semester. The doctoral student is allowed only one opportunity to take the final examination.

No unabsolved grades of D, F, or U for any course can be listed on the degree plan. The student must be registered for any remaining hours of 681, 684, 690, 691, 692, 791 or other graduate courses specifically designated as S/U in the course catalog during the semester of the final exam. No student may be given a final examination until they have been admitted to candidacy and their current official cumulative and degree plan GPAs are 3.00 or better.

To be admitted to candidacy for a doctoral degree, a student must have:

1.       completed all formal coursework on the degree plan with the exception of any remaining 681, 684, 690 and 691, 692 (Professional Study), or 791 hours,

2.       a 3.0 Graduate GPA and a Degree Plan GPA of at least 3.0 with no grade lower than C in any course on the degree plan,

3.       passed the preliminary examination,

4.       submitted an approved dissertation proposal,

5.       met the residence requirements.

The request to hold and announce the final examination must be submitted to the Graduate and Professional School a minimum of 10 working days in advance of the scheduled date. Any changes to the degree plan must be approved by the Graduate and Professional School prior to the submission of the request for final examination.

 The student’s advisory committee will conduct this examination. The final examination is not to be administered until the dissertation or record of study is available in substantially final form to the student’s advisory committee, and all concerned have had adequate time to review the document.  Whereas the final examination may cover the broad field of the candidate’s training, it is presumed that the major portion of the time will be devoted to the dissertation and closely allied topics. Persons other than members of the graduate faculty may, with mutual consent of the candidate and the chair of the advisory committee, be invited to attend a final examination for an advanced degree. A positive vote by all members of the graduate committee with at most one dissension is required to pass a student on his or her exam. A department can have a stricter requirement provided there is consistency within all degree programs within a department. Upon completion of the questioning of the candidate, all visitors must excuse themselves from the proceedings.

The student’s department will promptly report the results of the Final Examination to the Graduate and Professional School via the Report of Doctoral Final Examination form. These forms should be submitted to the Graduate and Professional School within 10 working days of completion of the final examination. The Graduate and Professional School must be notified in writing of any cancellations.

A positive evaluation of the final exam by all members of a student’s advisory committee with at most one dissension is required to pass a student on his or her final exam. The Report of the Final Examination Form must be submitted with original signatures of only the committee members approved by the Graduate and Professional School. If necessary, multiple copies of the form may be submitted with different committee member original signatures. If an approved committee member substitution (1 only) has been made, his/her signature must be included on the form submitted to the Graduate and Professional School.

The ability to perform independent research must be demonstrated by the dissertation,  which must be the original work of the candidate . Whereas acceptance of the dissertation is based primarily on its scholarly merit, it must also exhibit creditable literary workmanship. The format of the dissertation must be acceptable to the Graduate and Professional School. Guidelines for the preparation of the dissertation are available in the  Thesis Manual , which is available online at  https://grad.tamu.edu .

After successful defense and approval by the student’s advisory committee and the head of the student’s major department (or chair of the intercollegiate faculty, if applicable), a student must submit his/her dissertation in electronic format as a single PDF file. The PDF file must be uploaded to the website,  https://grad.tamu.edu . Additionally, a signed paper approval form with original signatures must be received by the Graduate and Professional School. Both the PDF file and the signed approval form are required by the deadline.

Deadline dates for submitting are announced each semester or summer term in the Graduate and Professional School (see Time Limit statement). These dates also can be accessed via the website  https://grad.tamu.edu .

Each student who submits a document for review is assessed a one-time thesis/dissertation processing fee through Student Business Services. This processing fee is for the thesis/dissertation services provided. After commencement, dissertations are digitally stored and made available through the Texas A&M Libraries.

A dissertation that is deemed unacceptable by the Graduate and Professional School because of excessive corrections will be returned to the student’s department head or chair of the intercollegiate faculty . The manuscript must be resubmitted as a new document, and the entire review process must begin anew. All original submittal deadlines must be met during the resubmittal process in order to graduate.

A maximum of 4 credit hours of 685 courses are permitted towards the PhD degree.

Additional Requirements

Continuous registration, admission to candidacy.

  • 99-Hour Cap on Doctoral Degree

Application for Degree

A student who enters the doctoral degree program with a baccalaureate degree must spend one academic year plus one semester in resident study at Texas A&M University. A student who holds master’s degree when he/she enters doctoral degree program must spend one academic year in resident study. One academic year may include two adjacent regular semesters or one regular semester and one adjacent 10-week summer semester. The third semester is not required to be adjacent to the one year. Enrollment for each semester must be a minimum of 9 credit hours each to satisfy the residence requirement. A minimum of 1 credit hour must be in a non-distance education delivery mode. Semesters in which the student is enrolled in all distance education coursework will not count toward fulfillment of the residence requirement.

To satisfy the residence requirement, the student must complete a minimum of 9 credit hours per semester or 10-week summer semester in resident study at Texas A&M University for the required period. A student who enters a doctoral degree program with a baccalaureate degree may fulfill residence requirements in excess of one academic year (18 credit hours) by registration during summer sessions or by completion of a less-than-full course load (in this context a full course load is considered 9 credit hours per semester).

Students who are employed full-time while completing their degree may fulfill total residence requirements by completion of less-than-full time course loads each semester. In order to be considered for this, the student is required to submit a Petition for Waivers and Exceptions along with verification of his/her employment to the Graduate and Professional School. An employee should submit verification of his/her employment at the time he/she submits the degree plan. See  Registration.

See  Residence Requirements .

All requirements for doctoral degrees must be completed within a period of ten consecutive calendar years for the degree to be granted. A course will be considered valid until 10 years after the end of the semester in which it is taken. Graduate credit for coursework more than ten calendar years old at the time of the final oral examination may not be used to satisfy degree requirements.

A final corrected version of the dissertation or record of study in electronic format as a single PDF file must be cleared by the Graduate and Professional School within one year of the semester in which the final exam is taken. Exams taken in between terms will expire at the end of the term that ended prior to the exam. For example, a final exam taken and passed during the fall 2022 semester will expire at the end of the fall 2023 semester. A final exam taken in the time between the summer and fall 2022 semesters will expire at the end of the summer 2023 semester. Failure to do so will result in the degree not being awarded.

A student in a program leading to a Doctor of Philosophy who has completed all coursework on his/her degree plan other than 691 (research) are required to be in continuous registration until all requirements for the degree have been completed. See  Continuous Registration Requirements .

  • completed all formal coursework on the degree plan with the exception of any remaining 681, 684, 690 and 691 or 791.
  • a 3.0 Graduate GPA and a Degree Plan GPA of at least 3.0 with no grade lower than C in any course on the degree plan,
  • passed the preliminary examination (written and oral portions),
  • submitted an approved dissertation proposal,
  • met the residence requirements. The final examination will not be authorized for any doctoral student who has not been admitted to candidacy.

A student is required to possess a competent command of English. For English language proficiency requirements, see the Admissions section of this catalog. The doctoral (PhD) foreign language requirement at Texas A&M University is a departmental option, to be administered and monitored by the individual departments of academic instruction.

99-Hour Cap on Doctoral Degrees

In Texas, public colleges and universities are funded by the state according to the number of students enrolled. In accordance with legislation passed by the Texas Legislature, the number of hours for which state universities may receive subvention funding at the doctoral rate for any individual is limited to 99 hours. Texas A&M and other universities will not receive subvention for hours in excess of the limit.

Institutions of higher education are allowed to charge the equivalent of non-resident tuition to a resident doctoral student who has enrolled in 100 or more semester credit hours of doctoral coursework.

Doctoral students at Texas A&M have seven years to complete their degree before being charged out-of-state tuition. A doctoral student who, after seven years of study, has accumulated 100 or more doctoral hours will be charged tuition at a rate equivalent to out-of-state tuition. Please note that the tuition increases will apply to Texas residents as well as students from other states and countries who are currently charged tuition at the resident rate. This includes those doctoral students who hold GAT, GANT, and GAR appointments or recipients of competitive fellowships who receive more than $1,000 per semester. Doctoral students who have not accumulated 100 hours after seven years of study are eligible to pay in-state tuition if otherwise eligible.

Doctoral students who exceed the credit limit will receive notification from the Graduate and Professional School during the semester in which they are enrolled and exceeding the limit in their current degree program. The notification will explain that the State of Texas does not provide funding for any additional hours in which a student is enrolled in excess of 99 hours. Texas A&M University will recover the lost funds by requiring students in excess of 99 hours to pay tuition at the non-funded, non-resident rate. This non-funded, non-resident tuition rate status will be updated for the following semester and in all subsequent semesters until receipt of a doctoral degree. Please see the  Tuition Calculator  at the non-resident rate for an example of potential charges.

The following majors are exempt from the 99-Hour Cap on Doctoral Degrees and have a limit of 130 doctoral hours:

  • Biochemistry
  • Biomedical Sciences
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Counseling Psychology
  • Genetics and Genomics
  • Health Services Research
  • Medical Sciences
  • Microbiology
  • Neurosciences (School of Medicine)
  • Oral and Craniofacial Biomedical Sciences
  • Pharmaceutical Sciences
  • Public Health Sciences
  • School Psychology

The hour limit for these majors is 130 doctoral hours

For information on applying for your degree, please visit the  Graduation  section.

Graduate School

  • Resources to Prepare for Graduate School
  • Adonara Mucek, Ph.D. Geology '17
  • Adriana Mendoza, Ph.D. Mathematics '14
  • Andrew Olsen
  • Becca Maher ('21, Ph.D.)
  • Bryan Lynn, Ph.D. Integrative Biology
  • Celeste Frazier Barthel, Ph.D. Education '21
  • Diane Brandt
  • Francesca Germano, Toxicology, M.S.
  • Garrett Rogers
  • Jafra Thomas
  • Jen Hayes, Horticulture, PhD
  • Jordan Jimmie
  • Jordan Spradlin, Public Health, MPH
  • Kalina Fahey, Psychology, Ph.D.
  • Katie Stelling, Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Ph.D.
  • Kelsey Contreras
  • Layla Ghazi
  • Marie Tosa, Ph.D. Wildlife Sciences
  • Sara Letton
  • Tiara Walz, Ph.D. Public Health
  • Glossary of Terms
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Water resources engineering (ph.d., m.s., minor).

Students enrolled in this degree will be broadly trained to undertake life-long careers in water resources system design, and will have the option to focus on groundwater, surface water, or watershed engineering.

Students will be required to take a minimum of 12 (M.S.) or 15 (Ph.D.) credits of graduate level engineering courses, and at least 6 (M.S.) or 9 (Ph.D.) credits of water science courses to support the engineering analysis. Water science courses may be selected from non-engineering departments across the campus, and are required to provide the students with the scientific context to understand the non-quantitative aspects of water resource systems.

Students completing the WRE program will meet the coursework requirements to attain Professional Hydrologist certification through the American Institute of Hydrology (AIH). Prior to graduation, all students in WRE will be required to show competence in mathematics to the level of applied differential equations (MTH 256), have a year of calculus-based physics and chemistry at the undergraduate level.

  Water Resources Engineering Website

  Graduate School

  Checklist for WRE

 Corvallis

Admissions Requirements

Required tests.

The GRE is not required.

English Language Requirements ?

English language requirements for international applicants to this program are the same as the standard Graduate School requirements .

Additional Requirements

Application requirements, including required documents, letters, and forms, vary by program and may not be completely represented here. The processing of your application will not be completed until these requirements have been met. Please, before applying to this program, always contact the program office to confirm application requirements.

Application Process

Please review the graduate school application process and Apply Online .

Dates & Deadlines ?

Admissions deadline for all applicants, funding deadline for all applicants, concentrations , mais participation.

This program is not offered as a MAIS field of study.

AMP Participation ?

This program does not participate in the Accelerated Master's Platform (AMP)

Contact Info

Graduate School Heckart Lodge 2900 SW Jefferson Way Oregon State University Corvallis, OR 97331-1102

Phone: 541-737-4881 Fax: 541-737-3313

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Hydrology and Atmospheric Sciences | Home

Doctor of Philosophy in Hydrology and Water Resources

Description.

(Effective Fall 2019) TIMEFRAME: The program is designed for students interested in the physical, chemical, and biological aspects of the hydrologic cycle, as well as water resources systems, environmental studies, or water policy and the social sciences related to water resources. Students may concentrate in one or a combination of these areas but are expected to acquire fundamental proficiency in all aspects of hydrology and water resources. Research-based study programs are individually planned to meet the student's special interests and professional objectives. Time-to-completion for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Hydrology is approximately 3.5-5 years (coursework, research, writing the dissertation, all exams) for well-prepared students.  All candidates must submit a dissertation or dissertation publication manuscript which has been judged by the student's committee to be eligible for publication in appropriate scientific journals and present the results at two regional, national, or international scientific meetings.

STUDY TOPICS:  Active research areas include hydrogeology, hydrogeochemistry, hydrometeorology, hydroclimatology, environmental hydrology, ground-water hydrology, surface water hydrology, vadose zone hydrology, mathematical and statistical methods in hydrology (including stochastic and numerical modeling), water resources sytems, and water resources policy.

PREPARATION: Doctoral applicants should have completed a Master of Science degree with a major in hydrology, water resources, environmental sciences, environmental engineering, or a related field.  (Holders of a Bachelor's degree cannot enter the program directly.)  Students who have completed all of the required undergraduate mathematics and science prerequisites may have a decreased time to completion. NOTE: Students must have completed at least 2 semesters of calculus and have no more than 4 outstanding course deficiencies at the time of matriculation. All students are expected to acquire basic computer programming/coding skills (e.g. Python, MATLAB, Fortran, C++) and complete a field methods/laboratory-field synthesis course sequence. To satisfy the professional development requirement, students are required to attend weekly seminars and colloquia at the beginning of academic residency, officially enroll in the HWRS colloquium (595A) for at least one semester at some time during residency, and make two formal seminar presentations of their dissertation research (at least one oral presentation) at approved regional, national, or international conferences near the end of their academic residency.

FORMAL EXAMINATIONS: Where gaps exist in background knowledge of basic hydrology and water resources (primary areas of surface water hydrology, subsurface hydrology, water quality-chemistry, water resources systems), first-year doctoral students may be required to complete fundamental core courses in preparation for the Doctoral Qualifying Examination. This exam must be passed by the end of the second semester in residence. After all course work for the Major and Minor has been completed (typically by the end of 2 1/2 to 3 years in residence), the Comprehensive Examination process -- which will include multiple Written exams and one Oral exam -- is initiated. When the Comprehensive Exams have been passed, the student becomes an official doctoral degree candidate. A Final Doctoral Oral Examination, or Dissertation Defense, is required in the final semester. See the  PHD HWRS Program Guide for full details.                                                                                                                                                     

Apply at the Graduate College website : Click on the Apply Now button for the Program of Study "Hydrology (PHD)."  You will be required to upload a variety of documents, including:

  • All Applicants:
  • Scanned copies of original transcripts (do not send original transcripts with official seal and signature until after you are accepted into the program)
  • Names/contact information for three (3) letters of recommendation (referees will submit letters to us online)
  • Resume or curriculum vitae
  • Statement of research interests
  • International Applicants Only: English Proficiency scores also required (details below)

English Proficiency Guidelines: Non-native speakers of English should consult the Graduate College website for information about documenting their proficiency in English . Currently, these minimum scores satisfy the English Proficiency requirement:

  • TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language): Minimum score 79 (or 60 on the revised PBT, with no section score lower than 15). Individual MyBest scores must also be dated within 2 years of the enrollment term to be considered valid.
  • IELTS (International English Language Testing System): Minimum composite score of 7, with no subject area below a 6
  • Pearson PTE Academic : Minimum score of 60
  • Graduate English Language Endorsement from the University of Arizona's Center for English as a Second Language (CESL)
  • CEPT Full Academic Test at the University of Arizona's Center for English as a Second Language (CESL), minimum total score of 110
  • Exemptions by Country from submitting English proficiency scores may be found at the Graduate College website, Requirements by Country

Admission deadlines:

  • Domestic Applicants:  January 15 for Fall Semester.  October 1 for Spring Semester.
  • International Applicants:  January 15 for Fall Semester.  August 1 for Spring Semester.

Students may be eligible for support through Graduate Assistantships in research and teaching, fee waivers (scholarships), and fellowships. Other funding opportunities are provided by the Graduate College at their Financial Resources website .

Degree Program Reqs

(Effective Fall 2019) The degree requires a minimum of 54 semester units in the Major field of study (HWRS) which includes 36 course units and 18 dissertation units. A complementary Minor field of study (number of units varies) is also required (see Doctoral Minor below). All undergraduate prerequisite courses in math and science should be completed by the end of the first year in residence. See the PHD HWRS Program Guide for full details.

UNDERGRADUATE COURSE PREREQUISITES*

  • Physical geology:  1 semester
  • College chemistry:  2-semester sequence in inorganic/analytical chemistry
  • College physics:  2-semester sequence, one course in mechanics and one course in electricity/magnetism or optics/thermodynamics
  • Fluid mechanics:  1 semester
  • Mathematics:  Calculus 1, calculus 2, vector calculus, and introductory differential equations
  • Statistics:  1 semester in statistics or probability theory for the physical sciences or engineering
  • *You must have received a grade of C or higher to satisfy these course prerequisite requirements. Grades below C are not recognized the UA Graduate College.
  • *Please note that we cannot accept students with more than four undergraduate course deficiencies, and you must have completed at least two semesters of calculus. If you have a course in progress or course/courses to be completed prior to beginning our program, you may note this on the graduate application.

CORE COURSES

No specific core courses are required for doctoral students, although inclusion of one or more in the plan of study may help students prepare for the Doctoral Oral Qualifying Examination (end of second semester/Year 1).  Consult with the Director of Graduate Studies-Hydrology for advice. 

  • HWRS 517A Fundamentals of Water Quality (3 units) Fall
  • HWRS 518 Fundamentals in Subsurface Hydrology (3 units) Fall
  • HWRS 519 Fundamentals in Surface Hydrology (3 units) Spring
  • HWRS 528 Fundamentals: Systems Approach to Hydrologic Modeling (3 units) Fall

HWRS PRIMARY FACULTY ADVANCED ELECTIVES

Advanced elective course work must be approved by the Director of Graduate Studies-Hydrology. The Doctoral Plan of Study must include a minimum of 21 semester units in this category (includes core courses and HWRS Primary Faculty advanced elective courses). (Independent study, professional development enrollment, and field methods are not included in this category.) Refer fo the  PHD HWRS Program Guide for a  list of approved HWRS Primary Faculty courses .

OTHER ELECTIVES & TRANSFER COURSE WORK

The plan of study should also include 12 additional units from: 1) the HWRS Primary Faculty course list, 2) approved transfer course work, and/or 3) approved graduate-level courses from other UA departments. Refer fo the  PHD HWRS Program Guide for a list of pre-approved courses outside the department. Consult with the Director of Graduate Studies-Hydrology regarding potential transfer course work.

FIELD METHODS

  • HWRS 513A Field Methods (2 units) Spring
  • HWRS 513B Field Synthesis (1 unit) Summer Presession (completed by end of May)

DISSERTATION

  • HWRS 920 Dissertation (18 units total) -- delete any excess units from Doctoral Plan of Study prior to submission

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

  • Enrollment in HWRS 595A Weekly Colloquium, Current Topics in Hydrology and Atmospheric Sciences, for at least one semester is required.  These units are not included in the Doctoral Plan of Study.
  • Two oral or poster presentations (minimum one oral) of the doctoral dissertation research at approved regional, national, or international conferences is required. No academic credit is awarded for oral or poster presentations.
  • Submit an email memo with details to the Director of Graduate Studies-Hydrology (see Program Guide for instructions)

DOCTORAL MINOR

  • A doctoral minor area of study (outside the department) that complements and supports the dissertation research is required.  The minimum semester units required vary by department, ranging from 9-15 semester units (the average is 12 units).
  • Common Minors and their course prefixes include Applied Mathematics (APPL), Arid Lands Resource Science (ARL), Atmospheric Sciences (ATMO), Chemical Engineering (CHEE), Civil Engineering (CE), Computer Science (CS), Geography and Development (GEOG), Geological Engineering (GEN), Geosciences (GEOS), Global Change (GC), Mining Engineering (MNE), Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (REM), Renewable Natural Resource Studies (RNR), Soil-Water-Environmental Sciences (ENVS/SWES), and Systems Engineering (SIE).  Other Minor areas of study may also be possible.

EXAMINATIONS

  • End Year 1/Second Semester: Doctoral Qualifying Examination in the Major -- Contact the HAS Program Coordinator for details
  • End Year 1 Doctoral Qualifying Examination for the Minor -- May be optional, so consult Minor Department
  • End Year 3 Doctoral Written and Oral Comprehensive Examinations in the Major and Minor -- Initiate after all course work completed
  • Year 4-5 Doctoral Final Oral Examination -- Dissertation Defense

DISSERTATION ARCHIVAL

Electronic submission of the doctoral dissertation to the Graduate College and archival with ProQuest UMI is required. The department does not require a copy, although members of the student's faculty committee may request a copy of the manuscript.

Be aware of the Graduate College's Steps to Your Degree requirements timeline when planning your examinations (Comprehensive Process and Final Oral/Defense). Allow yourself enough time to make any required revisions of the doctoral dissertation before submission to the Graduate College. The Graduate College's electronic degree audit system includes the following GradPath forms which are required for all Doctor of Philosophy degree candidates. You can complete these forms by logging on to the university's Student UAccess system. You can also refer to the department's PHD HWRS Program Guide and the  Dissertation Manuscript Options for instructions and guidance:

  • Responsible Conduct of Research Form
  • Only if using external transfer courses
  • Doctoral Plan of Study
  • Comprehensive Exam Committee Appointment Form
  • Announcement of Doctoral Comprehensive Examination
  • Submitted by Committee Chair
  • Candidacy Fees charged to student bursar's account upon advancement to doctoral candidacy
  • Verification of Prospectus/Proposal Approval
  • Doctoral Dissertation Committee Form
  • Must be submitted and approved at least one week before the date of final examination/defense
  • Submission of Final Dissertation Manuscript for Archiving
  • Exit Survey

Learning Outcomes

Refer to the Assessment section for learning outcomes and measures.

General Inquiry:

[email protected]

Admissions Contact:

Lupe Romero

Lupe Romero

Director of Graduate Studies:

Martha Whitaker

Martha P.L. Whitaker

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Environmental and Water Resources Engineering PhD

School of engineering and applied sciences, program description.

Research conducted in environmental engineering aims to gain a deeper understanding of the physical, chemical and biological processes that influence the health of our environment. Students in the Environmental and Water Resources Engineering PhD program acquire a comprehensive understanding of these processes and apply their knowledge to develop innovative engineering solutions for pollution prevention and treatment, environmental restoration, and sustainable resource management. Additionally, PhD students engage in original research to expand the scientific knowledge base and drive advancements in engineering practices.

School of Engineering and Applied Sciences Office of Graduate Education 415 Bonner Hall Buffalo, NY 14260 Email: [email protected]

Instruction Method

  • In Person   (100 percent of courses offered in person)

Full/Part Time Options

Credits required, time-to-degree, application fee.

This program is officially registered with the New York State Education Department (SED).

Online programs/courses may require students to come to campus on occasion. Time-to-degree and number of credit hours may vary based on full/part time status, degree, track and/or certification option chosen. Time-to-degree is based on calendar year(s). Contact the department for details.

Oregon State University

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Academic Catalog

Water resources engineering graduate major (ms, phd).

This program is available at the following location:

A graduate major in Water Resources Engineering for the master of science and doctor of philosophy degree programs is offered with specialization in groundwater engineering, surface water engineering, or watershed engineering. Seminars, courses, and reading and conference courses in water resources engineering are offered by the Water Resources Graduate Program.

The graduate major options are structured around courses designed to broaden the student’s education in one of the above areas of concentration. Many departments and schools across the university offer courses related to water resources engineering . About 20 departments conduct teaching or research programs in water resources.

For more information, visit the  website .

Major Code:   3100

Upon successful completion of the program, students will meet the following learning outcomes:

  • Conduct research or produce some other form of creative work.
  • Demonstrate mastery of subject material.
  • Conduct scholarly or professional activities in an ethical manner.
  • Produce and defend an original significant contribution to knowledge.
  • Conduct scholarly activities in an ethical manner.

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Water Resources Engineering

Degrees offered.

  • M.S. Civil Engineering: Water Resources Engineering Specialty
  • M.E. Civil Engineering: Water Resources Engineering Specialty
  • Ph.D. Civil Engineering: Water Resources Engineering Specialty

What is Water Resources Engineering?

Water resources engineering has its roots in the tasks of supplying water for human use, removing water when humans are finished using it and developing methods of avoiding damage from excess water (floods). Much of the work of water resource engineers involves the planning and management of constructed facilities that address these tasks. Positions for undergraduates and graduates who specialize in water resources engineering can be found in both engineering consulting firms and in government entities charged with supplying water or dealing with its hazards.

In the past few years, students in the water resources concentration have largely taken jobs with consulting engineering firms in the big cities of Texas, although a number have joined firms on the west coast. The growing demand for water supplies and flood control in developed land lead our students to fulfilling careers.

Degree Information

Students can earn an M.S., M.Eng. and Ph.D. degrees in civil engineering in the water resources division of emphasis.

Master of Engineering and Master of Science (Non-Thesis)

The Master of Engineering and Master of Science (Non-Thesis) have identical requirements and are intended for students who seek a Master’s degree to prepare them for engineering practice. A minimum of 30 semester credit hours of approved courses is required for the Master of Engineering degree (MEng) and the Master of Science (Non-Thesis).

Master of Science (Thesis)

The Master of Science (Thesis) degree requires a minimum of 30 credit hours of coursework. All students must also meet the program prerequisites. Students generally complete the degree requirements in 15 to 24 months. Students must take 9 hours in both the fall and spring semesters to have full-time student status.

Doctor of Philosophy

The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree is a research-oriented degree requiring performance of independent research that is the original work of the degree candidate. The Ph.D. degree prepares students for careers in engineering practice, education, leadership, and research, including industry, government laboratories and academia. The final basis for granting the degree shall be the candidate’s grasp of the subject matter of a broad field of study and a demonstrated ability to do independent research. In addition, the candidate must have acquired the ability to express thoughts clearly and forcefully through both oral and written communication.

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International Programmes 2023/2024

phd water engineering

International Doctoral Programme - Environment Water (ENWAT) International Doctoral Programme - Environment Water (ENWAT)

University of stuttgart • stuttgart.

  • Course details
  • Costs / Funding
  • Requirements / Registration
  • About the university

Courses are held in English. Courses are also available in German. Participants can choose to write the doctoral thesis in either language.

ENWAT (Environment Water) is facilitated by the Civil and Environmental Engineering Sciences Department at University of Stuttgart. It is an international doctoral programme in the field of Environment Water (ENWAT) and hosts, at present, roughly 50 doctoral candidates. At the moment, five different institutions within the faculty participate in the programme. The course content is very broad and the specific subject of the dissertation depends on the institute. For research subjects, please see our website: http://www.enwat.uni-stuttgart.de The ENWAT programme itself aims to prepare you thoroughly, as a doctoral candidate, for your dissertation research through classes and workshops taught by faculty or guest lecturers. Participation in a seminar where research progress is discussed with all ENWAT doctoral researchers and supervisors is mandatory and takes place twice a year. Additionally, recruiting a co-adviser as well as the preparation of a research proposal and framework should be undertaken at an early stage within the programme.

Please check our website for information on current research subjects: https://www.enwat.uni-stuttgart.de/application/

The programme is structured into two phases. First phase (one to two years): attending courses (at least nine up to 18 ECTS), preparing your research topic, and presentations at the doctoral seminars The first phase ends with the qualifying exam. Second phase (two years): mainly research work, attending and presenting at the doctoral seminars The second phase ends with the doctoral exam (defence).

  • International guest lecturers

Approx. 200 EUR per semester

Living expenses amount to about 940 EUR per month. You will have to demonstrate that you have sufficient finances to cover your living expenses for 12 months. EU citizens may apply for state-guaranteed loans during the time of enrolment. For more information, see the links on our websites.

  • "Good" or better MSc, Dipl-Ing or equivalent "Diplom" as accepted by University of Stuttgart and a profound knowledge of the fields of environment and water or a relevant dissertation project
  • very good knowledge of English (e.g., TOEFL, IELTS test)
  • consent from a member of the faculty to supervise the thesis (the contacts will be established by ENWAT)
  • two letters of reference by professors who know the candidate well enough to judge her or his ability to perform a doctoral research OR one letter by an ENWAT faculty member willing to supervise the candidate's thesis

Adequate knowledge of the English language is required for admission to the programme. This prerequisite can be fulfilled through the submission of either: TOEFL test results indicating a minimum score of 213 points (CBT) IELTS test results indicating an Academic Band score of 6.5 Proof that the candidate's native language is English Proof that the candidate has successfully completed a university course (e.g., BSc or MSc) taught in English International students without prior knowledge of the German language must attend intensive German language courses preceding the programme.

[email protected]

Please indicate clearly for which of the announced projects you are applying.

Please be aware that it may be very challenging to finance your whole studies by working. Non-EU citizens are allowed by law to work for a maximum of 120 days per year. Only students who are employed by the university in one of the institutes or departments (Studentische/Wissenschaftliche Hilfskräfte) are exempt from this regulation, but other restrictions apply.

For more detailed information, please consult our websites: International Students: Financing your Studies and  Working during your studies

Both the campus in Stuttgart-Vaihingen and the campus in the centre of Stuttgart have on-site halls of residence. Dorm rooms (ranging from 240 to 350 EUR per month) are furnished. Some are equipped with a sink, and all have access to kitchen and sanitary facilities, telephone and Internet. From the campus in Stuttgart-Vaihingen, the city of Stuttgart can be reached by suburban railway within ten minutes.

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University of Stuttgart

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Intelligent systems for a sustainable society

The University of Stuttgart is one of the leading technically oriented universities in Germany with global significance. Located centrally in an economically strong region with vast cultural integration, the university sees itself as a hub of university-based, extramural and industrial research. Furthermore, it takes a role as a leader in research-based teaching, focused on quality and holism. The university is dedicated to researching and strengthening the interfaces between technology, society and culture in an interdisciplinary manner, defined as the "Stuttgart Way". This means the integration of engineering, natural sciences, humanities and social sciences based on the fundamentals of cutting-edge research at a disciplinary level.

Excellent research and teaching

The University of Stuttgart implements innovative concepts in research and teaching in order to provide knowledge and strategies for a meaningful and sustainable development. It focuses on basic research that is both knowledge-oriented and application-related. To facilitate this research, the university is actively part of regional, national and international research networks.

The university is committed to the principle of unity between research and teaching. Students acquire knowledge, expertise and the power of judgement, in accordance with the guidelines of scientific research and awareness. The university fosters fascination for the sciences, supporting its students and junior researchers at all stages of their careers. It promotes independent thinking and provides an environment for responsible action. In doing so, it educates individuals into exceptional experts who think in an integrative and global manner and act responsibly in the sciences, economics and society.

A powerful region

Founded in 1829, at the beginning of the Industrial Age, the University of Stuttgart continues to prepare the way for innovation within an economically and scientifically powerful region and contributes to the economic success and prosperity of our society. This process combines the requirements of a social and cultural change, which allows an early and extensive input of social interests in research and design as well as teaching and further education.

Open-mindedness

The University of Stuttgart stands for open-mindedness, individuality and community spirit. It brings together students that are eager to learn, highly motivated employees, outstanding teachers, and excellent researchers as well as visionary thinkers and inventors. By means of its culture of integration, the university creates and conveys knowledge for shaping the future of our society.

University location

The University of Stuttgart is nestled in one of Europe’s most vibrant industrial regions. This fosters many forms of interdisciplinary collaboration – for instance, in numerous Collaborative Research Centres (also known as CRC or sometimes CRC/TRR) and in application-oriented research assignments. The University of Stuttgart sets up a close relationship and a successful transfer of knowledge and technology between its research institutions and business enterprises in the region and beyond. This very practical orientation benefits research and teaching. At the same time, economic players profit from rapid access to new scientific knowledge and contact to experts in their specialised fields. There are numerous possibilities of collaboration for businesses. Furthermore, the university also maintains a close relationship with non-university research institutions such as the Max Planck Society, the Fraunhofer Society, the German Aerospace Center and the German Literature Archive Marbach. Thus, the optimal prerequisites for cutting-edge research at the highest level are all to be found in Stuttgart.

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College of Agricultural and Life Sciences

Water Resources Program

Physical Address: College of Natural Resources, Room 203B

Mailing Address: 875 Perimeter Drive MS 1133 Moscow, ID 83844-1133

Phone: 208-885-0111

Email: [email protected]

M.S. and Ph.D. Water Resources

Career information is not specific to degree level. Some career options may require an advanced degree.

Current Job Openings and Salary Range

in ID, WA, OR, MT and HI

Entry-Level

Senior-Level

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  • Career Options
  • Chief Sustainability Officer
  • Farmer, Rancher, or Other Agricultural Manager
  • Natural Sciences Manager
  • Water Resource Specialist
  • Regulatory Affairs Manager
  • Compliance Manager
  • Brownfield Redevelopment Specialist and Site Manager
  • Environmental Compliance Inspector
  • Sustainability Specialist
  • Water/Wastewater Engineer
  • Environmental Engineer
  • Soil and Plant Scientist
  • Conservation Scientist
  • Range Manager
  • Park Naturalist
  • Environmental Scientist and Specialist, Including Health
  • Environmental Restoration Planner
  • Hydrologist
  • Remote Sensing Scientist and Technologist
  • Environmental Economist
  • Urban and Regional Planner
  • Environmental Science Teacher, Postsecondary
  • Fish and Game Warden

Regional Employment Trends

Employment trends and projected job growth in ID, WA, OR, MT & HI

*Job data is collected from national, state and private sources. For more information, visit EMSI's data sources page .

  • Degree Prep

To prepare for courses required to earn a master's or doctoral degree in water resources, we recommend that you possess:

  • A bachelor’s degree in an engineering, natural science, social science or a related field.
  • Strong analytical, critical-thinking, computer and/or communication skills
  • Please see our graduate handbook (pdf)  for more extensive information
  • Degree Roadmap

Find a wealth of knowledge to help you succeed — from taking care of preliminary items associated with starting your graduate studies at the University of Idaho to finishing your degree.

Follow the detailed graduate admission requirements  before filling out your application to the College of Graduate Studies .

To find out about deadlines and eligibility requirements, please visit the University of Idaho Financial Aid office .

  • Scholarships

Graduate student research and teaching assistantships are frequently provided by faculty advisors for students accepted into the Water Resources Graduate Program. To find more about potential funding opportunities, please contact individual faculty members or the program director.

  • Hands-on Learning
  • Access to indoor and outdoor laboratories
  • Unique combination of research, networking and community involvement
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  • Idaho Water Resources Research Institute
  • H2IdahO is a student club for those interested in water
  • Graduate and Professional Student Association
  • IdaH2O is a Master Water Stewards Program for community outreach
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  • Employment Trends

Explore the World's Water Issues

In this unique distinctive program, you will learn to collaborate effectively with peers in other fields and with key stakeholders and professionals to define, research, and achieve creative and sustainable solutions to contemporary water problems. Earn an interdisciplinary master's or doctoral degree in any of three emphasis areas: engineering and science; science and management; or law, management and policy.

  • Graduate handbook (pdf)
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  • University-wide curriculum offering a broad range of classes
  • Three option areas provide targeted training
  • Easy access to indoor and outdoor laboratories for hands-on training
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The Water Center at Penn  is a center for urban water policy, innovation, and science that engages University faculty and students, regional decision makers, and national and global thought leaders in the development of integrated and innovative urban water strategies that address the biggest challenges facing urban water leaders today. Our applied research focuses on four critical and interconnected research areas, allowing us to provide holistic solutions to urgent water challenges.

Urban Water Systems

Our collective expertise, both within the Water Center and across the University, can help strengthen water system capacities in the face of looming crises. Through strategic technical support to distressed water systems and communities, we develop novel approaches and tools that can be scaled for impact through our extensive network of public, private and civil society partners. Our approach emphasizes water equity and environmental justice considerations and is particularly applicable to small or under-resourced urban communities and the water systems they depend on.

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The Water Center at Penn accelerates transformational change in urban watersheds through an ‘Integrated Water Management’ approach that addresses multiple challenges – integrating planning for water supply, wastewater and stormwater systems, protecting human health, and improving water quality. We help communities recognize the connections between various water systems, thereby encouraging a holistic approach to solving water challenges and engage stakeholders across social, economic, and political divides.

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Changes to the hydrologic regime are already challenging the basic assumptions on water quality and quantity that underpin our complex infrastructure and regulatory systems. The Water Center at Penn supports city decision makers and planners in creating sustainable and resilient cities in the face of a more erratic and unpredictable climate. To achieve this, we take a trans-disciplinary approach to water challenges by integrating public health, ecology, technology, business, governance, economic, equity, city planning, design and climate change considerations in proposed solutions.

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By connecting the University of Pennsylvania’s myriad of researchers across multiple disciplines, the Water Center leverages Penn’s capacity as a world class research institute. For example, the university’s finance, economics and risk management expertise can be used to address water sector finance and affordability issues, while computer science researchers can support water utilities ability to tap into the power of big data. We are uniquely positioned to bring real-world water challenges to leading topical researchers, subsequently supporting use and scaling of research outcomes by water sector practitioners.

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Two MIT PhD students awarded J-WAFS fellowships for their research on water

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Since 2014, the Abdul Latif Jameel Water and Food Systems Lab (J-WAFS) has advanced interdisciplinary research aimed at solving the world's most pressing water and food security challenges to meet human needs. In 2017, J-WAFS established the Rasikbhai L. Meswani Water Solutions Fellowship and the J-WAFS Graduate Student Fellowship. These fellowships provide support to outstanding MIT graduate students who are pursuing research that has the potential to improve water and food systems around the world. 

Recently, J-WAFS awarded the 2024-25 fellowships to Jonathan Bessette and Akash Ball, two MIT PhD students dedicated to addressing water scarcity by enhancing desalination and purification processes. This work is of important relevance since the world's freshwater supply has been steadily depleting due to the effects of climate change. In fact, one-third of the global population lacks access to safe drinking water. Bessette and Ball are focused on designing innovative solutions to enhance the resilience and sustainability of global water systems. To support their endeavors, J-WAFS will provide each recipient with funding for one academic semester for continued research and related activities.

“This year, we received many strong fellowship applications,” says J-WAFS executive director Renee J. Robins. “Bessette and Ball both stood out, even in a very competitive pool of candidates. The award of the J-WAFS fellowships to these two students underscores our confidence in their potential to bring transformative solutions to global water challenges.”

2024-25 Rasikbhai L. Meswani Fellowship for Water Solutions

The Rasikbhai L. Meswani Fellowship for Water Solutions is a doctoral fellowship for students pursuing research related to water and water supply at MIT. The fellowship is made possible by Elina and Nikhil Meswani and family. 

Jonathan Bessette is a doctoral student in the Global Engineering and Research (GEAR) Center within the Department of Mechanical Engineering at MIT, advised by Professor Amos Winter. His research is focused on water treatment systems for the developing world, mainly desalination, or the process in which salts are removed from water. Currently, Bessette is working on designing and constructing a low-cost, deployable, community-scale desalination system for humanitarian crises.

In arid and semi-arid regions, groundwater often serves as the sole water source, despite its common salinity issues. Many remote and developing areas lack reliable centralized power and water systems, making brackish groundwater desalination a vital, sustainable solution for global water scarcity. 

“An overlooked need for desalination is inland groundwater aquifers, rather than in coastal areas,” says Bessette. “This is because much of the population lives far enough from a coast that seawater desalination could never reach them. My work involves designing low-cost, sustainable, renewable-powered desalination technologies for highly constrained situations, such as drinking water for remote communities,” he adds.

To achieve this goal, Bessette developed a batteryless, renewable electrodialysis desalination system. The technology is energy-efficient, conserves water, and is particularly suited for challenging environments, as it is decentralized and sustainable. The system offers significant advantages over the conventional reverse osmosis method, especially in terms of reduced energy consumption for treating brackish water. Highlighting Bessette’s capacity for engineering insight, his advisor noted the “simple and elegant solution” that Bessette and a staff engineer, Shane Pratt, devised that negated the need for the system to have large batteries. Bessette is now focusing on simplifying the system’s architecture to make it more reliable and cost-effective for deployment in remote areas.

Growing up in upstate New York, Bessette completed a bachelor's degree at the State University of New York at Buffalo. As an undergrad, he taught middle and high school students in low-income areas of Buffalo about engineering and sustainability. However, he cited his junior-year travel to India and his experience there measuring water contaminants in rural sites as cementing his dedication to a career addressing food, water, and sanitation challenges. In addition to his doctoral research, his commitment to these goals is further evidenced by another project he is pursuing, funded by a J-WAFS India grant, that uses low-cost, remote sensors to better understand water fetching practices. Bessette is conducting this work with fellow MIT student Gokul Sampath in order to help families in rural India gain access to safe drinking water.

2024-25 J-WAFS Graduate Student Fellowship for Water and Food Solutions

The J-WAFS Graduate Student Fellowship is supported by the J-WAFS Research Affiliate Program , which offers companies the opportunity to engage with MIT on water and food research. Current fellowship support was provided by two J-WAFS Research Affiliates: Xylem , a leading U.S.-based provider of water treatment and infrastructure solutions, and GoAigua , a Spanish company at the forefront of digital transformation in the water industry through innovative solutions. 

Akash Ball is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Chemical Engineering, advised by Professor Heather Kulik. His research focuses on the computational discovery of novel functional materials for energy-efficient ion separation membranes with high selectivity. Advanced membranes like these are increasingly needed for applications such as water desalination, battery recycling, and removal of heavy metals from industrial wastewater. 

“Climate change, water pollution, and scarce freshwater reserves cause severe water distress for about 4 billion people annually, with 2 billion in India and China’s semiarid regions,” Ball notes. “One potential solution to this global water predicament is the desalination of seawater, since seawater accounts for 97 percent of all water on Earth.”

Although several commercial reverse osmosis membranes are currently available, these membranes suffer several problems, like slow water permeation, permeability-selectivity trade-off, and high fabrication costs. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are porous crystalline materials that are promising candidates for highly selective ion separation with fast water transport due to high surface area, the presence of different pore windows, and the tunability of chemical functionality. In the Kulik lab, Ball is developing a systematic understanding of how MOF chemistry and pore geometry affect water transport and ion rejection rates. By the end of his PhD, Ball plans to identify existing, best-performing MOFs with unparalleled water uptake using machine learning models, propose novel hypothetical MOFs tailored to specific ion separations from water, and discover experimental design rules that enable the synthesis of next-generation membranes.  

Ball’s advisor praised the creativity he brings to his research, and his leadership skills that benefit her whole lab. Before coming to MIT, Ball obtained a master’s degree in chemical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Bombay and a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering from Jadavpur University in India. During a research internship at IIT Bombay in 2018, he worked on developing a technology for in situ arsenic detection in water. Like Bessette, he noted the impact of this prior research experience on his interest in global water challenges, along with his personal experience growing up in an area in India where access to safe drinking water was not guaranteed.

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Best Global Universities for Mechanical Engineering in Russia

These are the top universities in Russia for mechanical engineering, based on their reputation and research in the field. Read the methodology »

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Here are the best global universities for mechanical engineering in Russia

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  • # 74 in Best Universities for Mechanical Engineering
  • # 879 in Best Global Universities  (tie)

30 Best universities for Mechanical Engineering in Moscow, Russia

Updated: February 29, 2024

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Below is a list of best universities in Moscow ranked based on their research performance in Mechanical Engineering. A graph of 269K citations received by 45.8K academic papers made by 30 universities in Moscow was used to calculate publications' ratings, which then were adjusted for release dates and added to final scores.

We don't distinguish between undergraduate and graduate programs nor do we adjust for current majors offered. You can find information about granted degrees on a university page but always double-check with the university website.

1. Moscow State University

For Mechanical Engineering

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2. Bauman Moscow State Technical University

Bauman Moscow State Technical University logo

3. National Research University Higher School of Economics

National Research University Higher School of Economics logo

4. Moscow Aviation Institute

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5. N.R.U. Moscow Power Engineering Institute

N.R.U. Moscow Power Engineering Institute logo

6. National Research Nuclear University MEPI

National Research Nuclear University MEPI logo

7. National University of Science and Technology "MISIS"

National University of Science and Technology "MISIS" logo

8. Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology

Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology logo

9. Moscow State Technological University "Stankin"

Moscow State Technological University "Stankin" logo

10. RUDN University

RUDN University logo

11. Moscow Polytech

Moscow Polytech logo

12. Moscow State University of Railway Engineering

Moscow State University of Railway Engineering logo

13. Finance Academy under the Government of the Russian Federation

Finance Academy under the Government of the Russian Federation logo

14. Moscow Medical Academy

Moscow Medical Academy logo

15. Russian State University of Oil and Gas

16. mendeleev university of chemical technology of russia.

Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology of Russia logo

17. Russian National Research Medical University

Russian National Research Medical University logo

18. Plekhanov Russian University of Economics

Plekhanov Russian University of Economics logo

19. National Research University of Electronic Technology

National Research University of Electronic Technology logo

20. Moscow State Pedagogical University

Moscow State Pedagogical University logo

21. Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration

Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration logo

22. State University of Management

State University of Management logo

23. Moscow State Institute of International Relations

Moscow State Institute of International Relations logo

24. Russian State Geological Prospecting University

25. russian state agricultural university.

Russian State Agricultural University logo

26. New Economic School

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27. Moscow State Technical University of Civil Aviation

Moscow State Technical University of Civil Aviation logo

28. Russian State University for the Humanities

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29. Russian State Social University

Russian State Social University logo

30. Moscow State Linguistic University

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Universities for Mechanical Engineering near Moscow

Engineering subfields in moscow.

IMAGES

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    Environmental and Water Resources Engineering. 13,544 EUR / year. 5 years. Students in the Environmental and Water Resources Engineering programs at the University at Buffalo develop a deep understanding of the physical, chemical and biological processes that influence human health and the environment.

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    18 Hydrology & Water Management PhDs in United States. Hydrologic Science and Engineering. Colorado School of Mines. Golden, Colorado, United States. Water Resources. University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Las Vegas, Nevada, United States. Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management. University of Wyoming.

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  13. water PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

    This exciting fully funded PhD is sponsored by EPSRC and Northumbrian Water, with an enhanced stipend of £21,500 per annum (with fees covered). Read more. Supervisor: Dr TL Lyu. 1 May 2024 PhD Research Project Funded PhD Project (UK Students Only) More Details.

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  18. The Water Center

    The Water Center at Penn is a center for urban water policy, innovation, and science that engages University faculty and students, regional decision makers, and national and global thought leaders in the development of integrated and innovative urban water strategies that address the biggest challenges facing urban water leaders today. Our applied research focuses on four critical and ...

  19. New PhD Water Engineering Jobs (Apply Today)

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  20. Best Global Universities for Engineering in Russia

    Germany. India. Italy. Japan. Netherlands. See the US News rankings for Engineering among the top universities in Russia. Compare the academic programs at the world's best universities.

  21. Two MIT PhD students awarded J-WAFS fellowships for their research on water

    Jonathan Bessette is a doctoral student in the Global Engineering and Research (GEAR) Center within the Department of Mechanical Engineering at MIT, advised by Professor Amos Winter. His research is focused on water treatment systems for the developing world, mainly desalination, or the process in which salts are removed from water.

  22. Mechanical Engineering in Russia: Best universities Ranked

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  23. Best Global Universities for Mechanical Engineering in Russia

    Germany. India. Italy. Japan. Netherlands. See the US News rankings for Mechanical Engineering among the top universities in Russia. Compare the academic programs at the world's best universities.

  24. Moscow, Russia's best Mechanical Engineering universities [Rankings]

    Below is a list of best universities in Moscow ranked based on their research performance in Mechanical Engineering. A graph of 269K citations received by 45.8K academic papers made by 30 universities in Moscow was used to calculate publications' ratings, which then were adjusted for release dates and added to final scores.