• More from M-W
  • To save this word, you'll need to log in. Log In

Definition of assignment

task , duty , job , chore , stint , assignment mean a piece of work to be done.

task implies work imposed by a person in authority or an employer or by circumstance.

duty implies an obligation to perform or responsibility for performance.

job applies to a piece of work voluntarily performed; it may sometimes suggest difficulty or importance.

chore implies a minor routine activity necessary for maintaining a household or farm.

stint implies a carefully allotted or measured quantity of assigned work or service.

assignment implies a definite limited task assigned by one in authority.

Examples of assignment in a Sentence

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'assignment.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

see assign entry 1

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Phrases Containing assignment

  • self - assignment

Dictionary Entries Near assignment

Cite this entry.

“Assignment.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary , Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/assignment. Accessed 30 May. 2024.

Legal Definition

Legal definition of assignment, more from merriam-webster on assignment.

Nglish: Translation of assignment for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of assignment for Arabic Speakers

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!

Play Quordle: Guess all four words in a limited number of tries.  Each of your guesses must be a real 5-letter word.

Can you solve 4 words at once?

Word of the day.

See Definitions and Examples »

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Popular in Grammar & Usage

More commonly misspelled words, commonly misspelled words, how to use em dashes (—), en dashes (–) , and hyphens (-), absent letters that are heard anyway, how to use accents and diacritical marks, popular in wordplay, pilfer: how to play and win, the words of the week - may 24, 9 superb owl words, 10 words for lesser-known games and sports, your favorite band is in the dictionary, games & quizzes.

Play Blossom: Solve today's spelling word game by finding as many words as you can using just 7 letters. Longer words score more points.

  • Dictionaries home
  • American English
  • Collocations
  • German-English
  • Grammar home
  • Practical English Usage
  • Learn & Practise Grammar (Beta)
  • Word Lists home
  • My Word Lists
  • Recent additions
  • Resources home
  • Text Checker

Definition of assignment noun from the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary

Definitions on the go

Look up any word in the dictionary offline, anytime, anywhere with the Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary app.

vocabulary of assignment

assignment in American English

Assignment in british english, examples of 'assignment' in a sentence assignment, related word partners assignment, trends of assignment.

View usage over: Since Exist Last 10 years Last 50 years Last 100 years Last 300 years

Browse alphabetically assignment

  • assigned randomly
  • assigned risk
  • assimilability
  • assimilable
  • All ENGLISH words that begin with 'A'

Related terms of assignment

  • seat assignment
  • tough assignment
  • writing assignment
  • challenging assignment
  • difficult assignment
  • View more related words

Quick word challenge

Quiz Review

Score: 0 / 5

Image

Wordle Helper

Tile

Scrabble Tools

Image

  • Utility Menu

University Logo

  • Writing Center
  • Writing Program
  • Designing Essay Assignments

by Gordon Harvey

Students often do their best and hardest thinking, and feel the greatest sense of mastery and growth, in their writing. Courses and assignments should be planned with this in mind. Three principles are paramount:

1. Name what you want and imagine students doing it

However free students are to range and explore in a paper, the general kind of paper you’re inviting has common components, operations, and criteria of success, and you should make these explicit. Having satisfied yourself, as you should, that what you’re asking is doable, with dignity, by writers just learning the material, try to anticipate in your prompt or discussions of the assignment the following queries:

  • What is the purpose of this? How am I going beyond what we have done, or applying it in a new area, or practicing a key academic skill or kind of work?
  • To what audience should I imagine myself writing?
  • What is the main task or tasks, in a nutshell? What does that key word (e.g., analyze, significance of, critique, explore, interesting, support) really mean in this context or this field?
  • What will be most challenging in this and what qualities will most distinguish a good paper? Where should I put my energy? (Lists of possible questions for students to answer in a paper are often not sufficiently prioritized to be helpful.)
  • What misconceptions might I have about what I’m to do? (How is this like or unlike other papers I may have written?) Are there too-easy approaches I might take or likely pitfalls? An ambitious goal or standard that I might think I’m expected to meet but am not?
  • What form will evidence take in my paper (e.g., block quotations? paraphrase? graphs or charts?) How should I cite it? Should I use/cite material from lecture or section?
  • Are there some broad options for structure, emphasis, or approach that I’ll likely be choosing among?
  • How should I get started on this? What would be a helpful (or unhelpful) way to take notes, gather data, discover a question or idea? Should I do research? 

2. Take time in class to prepare students to succeed at the paper

Resist the impulse to think of class meetings as time for “content” and of writing as work done outside class. Your students won’t have mastered the art of paper writing (if such a mastery is possible) and won’t know the particular disciplinary expectations or moves relevant to the material at hand. Take time in class to show them: 

  • discuss the assignment in class when you give it, so students can see that you take it seriously, so they can ask questions about it, so they can have it in mind during subsequent class discussions;
  • introduce the analytic vocabulary of your assignment into class discussions, and take opportunities to note relevant moves made in discussion or good paper topics that arise;
  • have students practice key tasks in class discussions, or in informal writing they do in before or after discussions;
  • show examples of writing that illustrates components and criteria of the assignment and that inspires (class readings can sometimes serve as illustrations of a writing principle; so can short excerpts of writing—e.g., a sampling of introductions; and so can bad writing—e.g., a list of problematic thesis statements);
  • the topics of originality and plagiarism (what the temptations might be, how to avoid risks) should at some point be addressed directly. 

3. Build in process

Ideas develop over time, in a process of posing and revising and getting feedback and revising some more. Assignments should allow for this process in the following ways:

  • smaller assignments should prepare for larger ones later;
  • students should do some thinking and writing before they write a draft and get a response to it (even if only a response to a proposal or thesis statement sent by email, or described in class);
  • for larger papers, students should write and get response (using the skills vocabulary of the assignment) to a draft—at least an “oral draft” (condensed for delivery to the class);
  • if possible, meet with students individually about their writing: nothing inspires them more than feeling that you care about their work and development;
  • let students reflect on their own writing, in brief cover letters attached to drafts and revisions (these may also ask students to perform certain checks on what they have written, before submitting);
  • have clear and firm policies about late work that nonetheless allow for exception if students talk to you in advance.
  • Pedagogy Workshops
  • Responding to Student Writing
  • Commenting Efficiently
  • Vocabulary for Discussing Student Writing
  • Guides to Teaching Writing
  • HarvardWrites Instructor Toolkit
  • Additional Resources for Teaching Fellows

Want to create or adapt books like this? Learn more about how Pressbooks supports open publishing practices.

1-College Writing

Assignment Vocabulary

VOCABULARY OFTEN USED IN WRITING ASSIGNMENT INSTRUCTIONS

[Modified from: Michelle Miller & Anne Greenhoe, Transition with Purpose: Pathways from English Language to Academic Study (2018). Portland State University      Reproduced with additions from: Skidmore College, NY: Common Terms for Paper Topics and Essay Questions: http://www.skidmore.edu/academics/writingbrd/qwords.HTML Permission from: Professor Michael Steven Marx, Associate Professor of English and Coordinator of Liberal Studies 1, English Department, Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866.

An Introduction to Choosing & Using Sources Copyright © 2015 by Teaching & Learning, Ohio State University Libraries is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

Cambridge Dictionary

  • Cambridge Dictionary +Plus

Meaning of assignment – Learner’s Dictionary

Your browser doesn't support HTML5 audio

(Definition of assignment from the Cambridge Learner's Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Translations of assignment

Get a quick, free translation!

{{randomImageQuizHook.quizId}}

Word of the Day

height above sea level

Keeping up appearances (Talking about how things seem)

Keeping up appearances (Talking about how things seem)

vocabulary of assignment

Learn more with +Plus

  • Recent and Recommended {{#preferredDictionaries}} {{name}} {{/preferredDictionaries}}
  • Definitions Clear explanations of natural written and spoken English English Learner’s Dictionary Essential British English Essential American English
  • Grammar and thesaurus Usage explanations of natural written and spoken English Grammar Thesaurus
  • Pronunciation British and American pronunciations with audio English Pronunciation
  • English–Chinese (Simplified) Chinese (Simplified)–English
  • English–Chinese (Traditional) Chinese (Traditional)–English
  • English–Dutch Dutch–English
  • English–French French–English
  • English–German German–English
  • English–Indonesian Indonesian–English
  • English–Italian Italian–English
  • English–Japanese Japanese–English
  • English–Norwegian Norwegian–English
  • English–Polish Polish–English
  • English–Portuguese Portuguese–English
  • English–Spanish Spanish–English
  • English–Swedish Swedish–English
  • Dictionary +Plus Word Lists
  • Learner’s Dictionary    Noun
  • Translations
  • All translations

To add assignment to a word list please sign up or log in.

Add assignment to one of your lists below, or create a new one.

{{message}}

Something went wrong.

There was a problem sending your report.

sadlier-connect

  • Mathematics
  • Reading and Writing
  • Intervention
  • Professional Learning
  • Virtual Events
  • What is Phonics?
  • Teaching Grammar
  • Vocabulary Games
  • What is Virtual Learning?
  • About Sadlier
  • Find a Sales Representative
  • International Distributors
  • International Programs
  • Online Catalogs
  • Sadlier School Site Map
  • Pricing & Ordering Information
  • Sadlier’s W-9
  • Sadlier’s Sole Source Letter
  • Sadlier’s Credit Application
  • Privacy Policy
  • Return Policy
  • Terms & Conditions

Sadlier's English Language Arts Blog

vocabulary of assignment

  • Author Interviews
  • Interactive Read Alouds
  • Close Reading
  • Vocabulary/Vocab Gal
  • Writing with Vocabulary
  • Assessments
  • Charts/Posters
  • Graphic Organizers
  • Back to School
  • End of School
  • Classroom Management
  • Grammar & Writing
  • Thinking Routines
  • About Our Bloggers

November 7, 2018 VG Teaching Resources Vocab & ELA Res , Vocab Gal , ELA K-5 , ELA Seasonal Back to School , ELA 6-8 , ELA Resources - Activities , ELA 9-12 , ELA PD - Classroom Management , ELA PD - Vocabulary , ELA Focus - Writing with Vocabulary , ELA Focus - Vocabulary

11 vocabulary homework ideas and how to motivate students to do it, by: vocab gal.

Homework is such a valuable formative assessment for both teachers and students, and yet students are motivated* by many different factors when it comes to their desire to actually complete the work. In this article, I'm sharing how to motivate students to do their homework and 11 vocabulary homework ideas and worksheets that work in grades 1–12. Plus, preview and grab my 7 Options for Vocabulary Homework Kit .

Keep scrolling to find vocabulary homework ideas! 

How to motivate students to do their homework.

As a teacher, I try to concentrate students’ learning on activities done in class, because asking some students to complete work at home can be daunting. Many times in my career I have been discouraged when more than half the class does not return to class with their homework assignment complete.

Yet we only have so many minutes with our students, and we need them to practice the concepts and skills they are learning until the knowledge becomes ingrained. Most students have a homeroom, study hall, or other downtime during the day in which they could complete activities, they just have to be motivated to do it.

Many studies cite “student choice” as one of the most important factors in inspiring students to learn. When students have the opportunity to select what questions to answer, what activity to complete or what role to play, they tend to feel more comfortable and confident about performing.

Additionally, research shows that when students are dedicated to a task important to them, like improving their video game scores, or optimizing their success on a playing field, they will go to great lengths to improve. While probably not as meaningful as their video game level, students will be more excited to answer questions about themselves than a generic worksheet.

By providing students with both choice and a topic that is personally meaningful, homework can be a great learning exercise as well as an important formative assessment.

Steps to Ensure Students Complete Homework

There are a few other motivating factors that can help establish homework as a meaningful part of a student’s educational experience. Here are suggested steps a school, parish, department, or teacher might take to ensure successful homework completion.

Step One First, confirm that students have a strong rapport with their teacher(s). While it is difficult to cultivate a deep relationship with each student, teachers should strive to show students that they value their students and are committed to helping them learn and grow to their fullest potential. I would encourage teachers not to assign homework for the first few weeks of school until they develop a classroom community of respect and appreciation for learning.

Step Two Second, once the classroom community has been established, teachers should specifically explain the importance of homework as a way of deeply ingraining knowledge. Teachers should also make it clear that homework is a meaningful formative assessment where both they and their students can understand what students know and where there are knowledge gaps.

Step Three Third, some students may be quite unhappy when being mandated to do specific work. Therefore, teachers should stress the choices a student gets when completing their homework and that students get to complete the work that best reflects their own sense of self.

Step Four Finally, the teacher should praise students individually, as well as praise the class when homework is turned in on time. Many students thrive on positive reinforcement and also many may feel guilt if they let their classmates or teacher down. Additionally, as many teachers know, a word of encouragement or a small sticker can make the difference to many.

How to Respond When Homework is Not Completed

When at last it comes time for homework collection, there will be students who did not complete the assignment, no matter how well it was set up. Teachers can again encourage students who did not complete the homework in time to think about what may motivate them to complete it. If a student seems to dislike direct mandates, providing support such as, “I know that you value your learning and will find a way to demonstrate your abilities,” might be more effective than, “Turn in your paper by Thursday or it’s a zero!”

For others who seem driven by the need to please or help others, teachers might encourage students by stating, “I’m disappointed that you weren’t able to complete your work on time, and I know you will submit your work in order to show us both what you know and understand,” might work better than, “Don’t you want the credit for this assignment?”

Vocabulary Homework Ideas for Students

For this post, I have a few homework assignments that model these ideas. Both in my new It's All About Me vocabulary practice page, and my tried-and true,  7 Options for Vocabulary Homework bundle, students are motivated to continue their learning because they have both choice and a focus on themselves, a topic in which they are already invested.

My new It's All About Me Vocabulary Activity tasks students with answering a series of questions about themselves using vocabulary words in context. On the first page of this download students will list their vocabulary words and write their own brief definitions. On the second page student will answer eight prompts. Each response should include at least one of the vocabulary words from their list in context . In each of their answers students must underline the context clues that would help someone unfamiliar with the word understand what it means.

I find that students tend to be more engaged in an assignment if they are asked to answer questions about themsleves than a generic worksheet. My new It's All About Me Vocabulary Activity tasks students with answering a series of questions about themselves using vocabulary words in context.

With the 7 Options for Vocabulary Homework bundle, students can choose from a variety of fun and engaging activities for learning or reviewing vocabulary words. In addition to the homework selection sheet, the bundle includes worksheets for vocabulary homework ideas number five and six. The other vocabulary homework options can be completed on a plain piece of paper or in student workbooks.

Here are the vocabulary activities listed on the 7 Options for Vocabulary Homework handout:

With the 7 Options for Vocabulary Homework bundle, students can choose from a variety of fun and engaging activities for learning or reviewing vocabulary words. In addition to the homework selection sheet, the bundle includes worksheets for vocabulary homework ideas number five and six. The other vocabulary homework options can be completed on a plain peice of paper or in student workbooks.

#1 Say Your Words

Do you love the sound of your own voice? Do you tend to learn information by teaching others? Then try saying each of the vocabulary words, out loud and in context, to friends, family, strangers, etc. Use either your flashcards or your list of words, and make sure to get initials from someone who heard you say your vocabulary sentence. If you can’t get a signature, just explain when and how you said the sentences and we will invoke the HONOR SYSTEM! Create two sentences per word.

Do you love to write? Do you copy your notes to help you remember information? Then try writing two sentences for each vocabulary word. These can either be two individual sentences for each word or you can put all of your words together in a story. (If you write a story, you only have to use each word once). Have fun and get creative – amuse me and impress me, but make sure you use your vocabulary words in context!

#3 Write Your Words in Other Classes

As an alternative to the above “Write your Words,” use your vocabulary in your assignments for other classes – social studies essays, science notes, art descriptions, etc. Write down the vocabulary you used for this assignment (For example: On my science test I said “Newton was meritorious,” etc.). You can abbreviate your explanations slightly, as long as I understand you know the word’s meaning; remember to use each word twice.

#4 Become Your Words

Do you gesture when you talk? Is it hard for you to sit still? Then consider creating motions to go along with your words. Cry for lament , raise your arms in praise for approbation , etc. See me during class to “perform” your motions, or write them down, making sure that the connection between word, meaning, and gesture makes sense.

#5 Draw Your Words

Are you an artist? Do you constantly doodle? Then create cartoons or drawings that illustrate each word’s meaning. Create one drawing or cartoon per word and make them neat, using clean white paper (consider using recycled paper that has printing on the other side). Paperclip all your drawings together for the end of the week.

Vocabulary Homework Ideas: Draw Your Words - Are you an artist? Do you constantly doodle? Then create cartoons or drawings that illustrate each word’s meaning. Create one drawing or cartoon per word and make them neat, using clean white paper (consider using recycled paper that has printing on the other side). Paperclip all your drawings together for the end of the week.

#6 Sing Your Words

Do you love to sing? Are you constantly creating your own raps? Try rewriting the lyrics to a song to incorporate each of your vocabulary words or write your own song, rap, etc. You can also write poetry; regardless of the form you choose, the words should be used in the correct context.

Vocabulary Homework Ideas: Sing Your Words - Do you love to sing? Are you constantly creating your own raps? Try rewriting the lyrics to a song to incorporate each of your vocabulary words or write your own song, rap, etc. You can also write poetry; regardless of the form you choose, the words should be used in the correct context.

#7 Test Your Words

Do you want to play teacher and write the test as well as take it? Now you can! Create a vocabulary test using all the words in a variety of different types of questions. Make sure to create the answer key to the test as well.

Download the 7 Options for Vocabulary Homework bundle and have students keep the selection sheet in their binders. Now they have seven weeks of vocabulary homework assignments!

Additional Vocabulary Homework Ideas

Ultimately, establishing a culture of community and trust in the classroom, explaining the reasoning behind and the benefits of homework, and providing choice and meaningful topics can make a significant difference in completion rates. Even if homework is not completed on time, teachers can still work to connect with each student to provide motivation to complete the assignments.

As educators, we all strive to make learning exciting and applicable to our students. By setting up clear expectations and providing interesting options, we can make any homework, including vocabulary homework, meaningful and valuable to students.

 *I have recently completed Gretchen Rubin’s audiobook The Four Tendencies about what motivates different groups of people. Many of the ideas about motivating students come loosely from her book as well as my own observations. I highly recommend the book to anyone wanting to learn how to better motivate themselves and others.

vocabulary of assignment

The Writing Center • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Understanding Assignments

What this handout is about.

The first step in any successful college writing venture is reading the assignment. While this sounds like a simple task, it can be a tough one. This handout will help you unravel your assignment and begin to craft an effective response. Much of the following advice will involve translating typical assignment terms and practices into meaningful clues to the type of writing your instructor expects. See our short video for more tips.

Basic beginnings

Regardless of the assignment, department, or instructor, adopting these two habits will serve you well :

  • Read the assignment carefully as soon as you receive it. Do not put this task off—reading the assignment at the beginning will save you time, stress, and problems later. An assignment can look pretty straightforward at first, particularly if the instructor has provided lots of information. That does not mean it will not take time and effort to complete; you may even have to learn a new skill to complete the assignment.
  • Ask the instructor about anything you do not understand. Do not hesitate to approach your instructor. Instructors would prefer to set you straight before you hand the paper in. That’s also when you will find their feedback most useful.

Assignment formats

Many assignments follow a basic format. Assignments often begin with an overview of the topic, include a central verb or verbs that describe the task, and offer some additional suggestions, questions, or prompts to get you started.

An Overview of Some Kind

The instructor might set the stage with some general discussion of the subject of the assignment, introduce the topic, or remind you of something pertinent that you have discussed in class. For example:

“Throughout history, gerbils have played a key role in politics,” or “In the last few weeks of class, we have focused on the evening wear of the housefly …”

The Task of the Assignment

Pay attention; this part tells you what to do when you write the paper. Look for the key verb or verbs in the sentence. Words like analyze, summarize, or compare direct you to think about your topic in a certain way. Also pay attention to words such as how, what, when, where, and why; these words guide your attention toward specific information. (See the section in this handout titled “Key Terms” for more information.)

“Analyze the effect that gerbils had on the Russian Revolution”, or “Suggest an interpretation of housefly undergarments that differs from Darwin’s.”

Additional Material to Think about

Here you will find some questions to use as springboards as you begin to think about the topic. Instructors usually include these questions as suggestions rather than requirements. Do not feel compelled to answer every question unless the instructor asks you to do so. Pay attention to the order of the questions. Sometimes they suggest the thinking process your instructor imagines you will need to follow to begin thinking about the topic.

“You may wish to consider the differing views held by Communist gerbils vs. Monarchist gerbils, or Can there be such a thing as ‘the housefly garment industry’ or is it just a home-based craft?”

These are the instructor’s comments about writing expectations:

“Be concise”, “Write effectively”, or “Argue furiously.”

Technical Details

These instructions usually indicate format rules or guidelines.

“Your paper must be typed in Palatino font on gray paper and must not exceed 600 pages. It is due on the anniversary of Mao Tse-tung’s death.”

The assignment’s parts may not appear in exactly this order, and each part may be very long or really short. Nonetheless, being aware of this standard pattern can help you understand what your instructor wants you to do.

Interpreting the assignment

Ask yourself a few basic questions as you read and jot down the answers on the assignment sheet:

Why did your instructor ask you to do this particular task?

Who is your audience.

  • What kind of evidence do you need to support your ideas?

What kind of writing style is acceptable?

  • What are the absolute rules of the paper?

Try to look at the question from the point of view of the instructor. Recognize that your instructor has a reason for giving you this assignment and for giving it to you at a particular point in the semester. In every assignment, the instructor has a challenge for you. This challenge could be anything from demonstrating an ability to think clearly to demonstrating an ability to use the library. See the assignment not as a vague suggestion of what to do but as an opportunity to show that you can handle the course material as directed. Paper assignments give you more than a topic to discuss—they ask you to do something with the topic. Keep reminding yourself of that. Be careful to avoid the other extreme as well: do not read more into the assignment than what is there.

Of course, your instructor has given you an assignment so that they will be able to assess your understanding of the course material and give you an appropriate grade. But there is more to it than that. Your instructor has tried to design a learning experience of some kind. Your instructor wants you to think about something in a particular way for a particular reason. If you read the course description at the beginning of your syllabus, review the assigned readings, and consider the assignment itself, you may begin to see the plan, purpose, or approach to the subject matter that your instructor has created for you. If you still aren’t sure of the assignment’s goals, try asking the instructor. For help with this, see our handout on getting feedback .

Given your instructor’s efforts, it helps to answer the question: What is my purpose in completing this assignment? Is it to gather research from a variety of outside sources and present a coherent picture? Is it to take material I have been learning in class and apply it to a new situation? Is it to prove a point one way or another? Key words from the assignment can help you figure this out. Look for key terms in the form of active verbs that tell you what to do.

Key Terms: Finding Those Active Verbs

Here are some common key words and definitions to help you think about assignment terms:

Information words Ask you to demonstrate what you know about the subject, such as who, what, when, where, how, and why.

  • define —give the subject’s meaning (according to someone or something). Sometimes you have to give more than one view on the subject’s meaning
  • describe —provide details about the subject by answering question words (such as who, what, when, where, how, and why); you might also give details related to the five senses (what you see, hear, feel, taste, and smell)
  • explain —give reasons why or examples of how something happened
  • illustrate —give descriptive examples of the subject and show how each is connected with the subject
  • summarize —briefly list the important ideas you learned about the subject
  • trace —outline how something has changed or developed from an earlier time to its current form
  • research —gather material from outside sources about the subject, often with the implication or requirement that you will analyze what you have found

Relation words Ask you to demonstrate how things are connected.

  • compare —show how two or more things are similar (and, sometimes, different)
  • contrast —show how two or more things are dissimilar
  • apply—use details that you’ve been given to demonstrate how an idea, theory, or concept works in a particular situation
  • cause —show how one event or series of events made something else happen
  • relate —show or describe the connections between things

Interpretation words Ask you to defend ideas of your own about the subject. Do not see these words as requesting opinion alone (unless the assignment specifically says so), but as requiring opinion that is supported by concrete evidence. Remember examples, principles, definitions, or concepts from class or research and use them in your interpretation.

  • assess —summarize your opinion of the subject and measure it against something
  • prove, justify —give reasons or examples to demonstrate how or why something is the truth
  • evaluate, respond —state your opinion of the subject as good, bad, or some combination of the two, with examples and reasons
  • support —give reasons or evidence for something you believe (be sure to state clearly what it is that you believe)
  • synthesize —put two or more things together that have not been put together in class or in your readings before; do not just summarize one and then the other and say that they are similar or different—you must provide a reason for putting them together that runs all the way through the paper
  • analyze —determine how individual parts create or relate to the whole, figure out how something works, what it might mean, or why it is important
  • argue —take a side and defend it with evidence against the other side

More Clues to Your Purpose As you read the assignment, think about what the teacher does in class:

  • What kinds of textbooks or coursepack did your instructor choose for the course—ones that provide background information, explain theories or perspectives, or argue a point of view?
  • In lecture, does your instructor ask your opinion, try to prove their point of view, or use keywords that show up again in the assignment?
  • What kinds of assignments are typical in this discipline? Social science classes often expect more research. Humanities classes thrive on interpretation and analysis.
  • How do the assignments, readings, and lectures work together in the course? Instructors spend time designing courses, sometimes even arguing with their peers about the most effective course materials. Figuring out the overall design to the course will help you understand what each assignment is meant to achieve.

Now, what about your reader? Most undergraduates think of their audience as the instructor. True, your instructor is a good person to keep in mind as you write. But for the purposes of a good paper, think of your audience as someone like your roommate: smart enough to understand a clear, logical argument, but not someone who already knows exactly what is going on in your particular paper. Remember, even if the instructor knows everything there is to know about your paper topic, they still have to read your paper and assess your understanding. In other words, teach the material to your reader.

Aiming a paper at your audience happens in two ways: you make decisions about the tone and the level of information you want to convey.

  • Tone means the “voice” of your paper. Should you be chatty, formal, or objective? Usually you will find some happy medium—you do not want to alienate your reader by sounding condescending or superior, but you do not want to, um, like, totally wig on the man, you know? Eschew ostentatious erudition: some students think the way to sound academic is to use big words. Be careful—you can sound ridiculous, especially if you use the wrong big words.
  • The level of information you use depends on who you think your audience is. If you imagine your audience as your instructor and they already know everything you have to say, you may find yourself leaving out key information that can cause your argument to be unconvincing and illogical. But you do not have to explain every single word or issue. If you are telling your roommate what happened on your favorite science fiction TV show last night, you do not say, “First a dark-haired white man of average height, wearing a suit and carrying a flashlight, walked into the room. Then a purple alien with fifteen arms and at least three eyes turned around. Then the man smiled slightly. In the background, you could hear a clock ticking. The room was fairly dark and had at least two windows that I saw.” You also do not say, “This guy found some aliens. The end.” Find some balance of useful details that support your main point.

You’ll find a much more detailed discussion of these concepts in our handout on audience .

The Grim Truth

With a few exceptions (including some lab and ethnography reports), you are probably being asked to make an argument. You must convince your audience. It is easy to forget this aim when you are researching and writing; as you become involved in your subject matter, you may become enmeshed in the details and focus on learning or simply telling the information you have found. You need to do more than just repeat what you have read. Your writing should have a point, and you should be able to say it in a sentence. Sometimes instructors call this sentence a “thesis” or a “claim.”

So, if your instructor tells you to write about some aspect of oral hygiene, you do not want to just list: “First, you brush your teeth with a soft brush and some peanut butter. Then, you floss with unwaxed, bologna-flavored string. Finally, gargle with bourbon.” Instead, you could say, “Of all the oral cleaning methods, sandblasting removes the most plaque. Therefore it should be recommended by the American Dental Association.” Or, “From an aesthetic perspective, moldy teeth can be quite charming. However, their joys are short-lived.”

Convincing the reader of your argument is the goal of academic writing. It doesn’t have to say “argument” anywhere in the assignment for you to need one. Look at the assignment and think about what kind of argument you could make about it instead of just seeing it as a checklist of information you have to present. For help with understanding the role of argument in academic writing, see our handout on argument .

What kind of evidence do you need?

There are many kinds of evidence, and what type of evidence will work for your assignment can depend on several factors–the discipline, the parameters of the assignment, and your instructor’s preference. Should you use statistics? Historical examples? Do you need to conduct your own experiment? Can you rely on personal experience? See our handout on evidence for suggestions on how to use evidence appropriately.

Make sure you are clear about this part of the assignment, because your use of evidence will be crucial in writing a successful paper. You are not just learning how to argue; you are learning how to argue with specific types of materials and ideas. Ask your instructor what counts as acceptable evidence. You can also ask a librarian for help. No matter what kind of evidence you use, be sure to cite it correctly—see the UNC Libraries citation tutorial .

You cannot always tell from the assignment just what sort of writing style your instructor expects. The instructor may be really laid back in class but still expect you to sound formal in writing. Or the instructor may be fairly formal in class and ask you to write a reflection paper where you need to use “I” and speak from your own experience.

Try to avoid false associations of a particular field with a style (“art historians like wacky creativity,” or “political scientists are boring and just give facts”) and look instead to the types of readings you have been given in class. No one expects you to write like Plato—just use the readings as a guide for what is standard or preferable to your instructor. When in doubt, ask your instructor about the level of formality they expect.

No matter what field you are writing for or what facts you are including, if you do not write so that your reader can understand your main idea, you have wasted your time. So make clarity your main goal. For specific help with style, see our handout on style .

Technical details about the assignment

The technical information you are given in an assignment always seems like the easy part. This section can actually give you lots of little hints about approaching the task. Find out if elements such as page length and citation format (see the UNC Libraries citation tutorial ) are negotiable. Some professors do not have strong preferences as long as you are consistent and fully answer the assignment. Some professors are very specific and will deduct big points for deviations.

Usually, the page length tells you something important: The instructor thinks the size of the paper is appropriate to the assignment’s parameters. In plain English, your instructor is telling you how many pages it should take for you to answer the question as fully as you are expected to. So if an assignment is two pages long, you cannot pad your paper with examples or reword your main idea several times. Hit your one point early, defend it with the clearest example, and finish quickly. If an assignment is ten pages long, you can be more complex in your main points and examples—and if you can only produce five pages for that assignment, you need to see someone for help—as soon as possible.

Tricks that don’t work

Your instructors are not fooled when you:

  • spend more time on the cover page than the essay —graphics, cool binders, and cute titles are no replacement for a well-written paper.
  • use huge fonts, wide margins, or extra spacing to pad the page length —these tricks are immediately obvious to the eye. Most instructors use the same word processor you do. They know what’s possible. Such tactics are especially damning when the instructor has a stack of 60 papers to grade and yours is the only one that low-flying airplane pilots could read.
  • use a paper from another class that covered “sort of similar” material . Again, the instructor has a particular task for you to fulfill in the assignment that usually relates to course material and lectures. Your other paper may not cover this material, and turning in the same paper for more than one course may constitute an Honor Code violation . Ask the instructor—it can’t hurt.
  • get all wacky and “creative” before you answer the question . Showing that you are able to think beyond the boundaries of a simple assignment can be good, but you must do what the assignment calls for first. Again, check with your instructor. A humorous tone can be refreshing for someone grading a stack of papers, but it will not get you a good grade if you have not fulfilled the task.

Critical reading of assignments leads to skills in other types of reading and writing. If you get good at figuring out what the real goals of assignments are, you are going to be better at understanding the goals of all of your classes and fields of study.

You may reproduce it for non-commercial use if you use the entire handout and attribute the source: The Writing Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Make a Gift

(e.g. [email protected])

Remember me

Forgot Password?

Defense Visual Information Distribution Service Logo

  • SECRETARY OF DEFENSE LLOYD J. AUSTIN III
  • Combatant Commands
  • Holiday Greetings Map
  • Taking Care of Our People
  • Focus on the Indo-Pacific
  • Support for Ukraine
  • Value of Service
  • Face of Defense
  • Science and Technology
  • Publications
  • Storytellers
  • Tell Your Story
  • Media Awards
  • Hometown Heroes

Hometown News

  • Create Request
  • Media Press Kit

DVIDS Mobile Logo

  • DVIDS DIRECT

Media Requests

About dvids.

  • Privacy & Security
  • Copyright Information
  • Accessibility Information
  • Customer Service

Assignment Complete: The Journey Concludes at the Happiest Place on Earth

Assignment Complete: The Journey Concludes at the Happiest Place on Earth

Photo By Sgt. 1st Class Nicholas Nofziger | Sgt. 1st Class Nick Nofziger poses in front of the "it's a small world" attraction at... ... read more read more

Photo By Sgt. 1st Class Nicholas Nofziger | Sgt. 1st Class Nick Nofziger poses in front of the "it's a small world" attraction at Disneyland Resort, Anaheim, Calif. in celebration of the attraction's 50th anniversary Apr. 13, 2024. Nofziger is currently serving as the first Training with Industry Communications Fellow at the Disneyland Resort, Anaheim, Calif. The Training with Industry program provides Active Duty U.S. Army Soldiers a one-year assignment with civilian companies to hone military specialty skills before returning to a utilization assignment in the Army. (Photo courtesy of Sgt. 1st Class Nick Nofziger)   see less | View Image Page

ANAHEIM, CA, UNITED STATES

Story by sgt. 1st class nicholas nofziger  , army public affairs center.

vocabulary of assignment

As part of the Training with Industry (TW) Program, Sgt. 1st Class Nofziger chose to complete a bi-monthly blog series documenting his journey. As the first TWI Communications Fellow at Disneyland Resort, Anaheim, Calif., this series serves to highlight the benefits of the TWI program and Nofziger’s personal experiences. ANAHEIM, Calif. – It is difficult to put into words what I feel right now. Honestly, as my time at the Disneyland Resort comes to a close, it is terribly bittersweet. I remember how I felt pulling up the HRC website, which I had done obsessively since my interview with the Disneyland Communications team and seeing my name next to “DISNEY.” My husband immediately knew based on my reaction that this was the assignment for which I had been chosen, and we were ecstatic. I had only been to Disneyland once when I was four years old and still remembered the sheer joy I felt at the Happiest Place on Earth. This year has been tough, which leads me to one of my final pieces of advice, one that I have extolled to many yet failed to follow myself: Go into each new experience with zero expectations, good or bad. Those of us in the military have often asked colleagues what to expect from our next assignments and been told horror stories about the infamous installations, or inflated wonders of other little known “gems” of the military world. Once we arrive, we make up our own minds, often being either disappointed because the “gem” was not near as shiny as we anticipated, or pleasantly surprised because the horrific experience about which we were warned is not nearly that bad. Because we make our own choices, and we make our own experiences. Life is what you make of it. Do not let anyone else dictate how your life will be, including your former self. My joy and excitement about coming to Disneyland was largely based on a 30-year memory and was not grounded in reality. I came here to work, to learn, to grow as a communicator, Soldier, and husband. There is much more I could have done if I had merely trusted my gut. I should have treated this assignment like a year-long assignment to the Republic of Korea, and left my husband at home, where he would have continued to thrive in his career, unburdened by following my dream across country. Perhaps then he would not have been forced to sit alone most days in our home, unable to find a job, and growing more and more depressed by the day. I blame myself for the effect this assignment has had on my family, but I also take this as one of the hardest lessons I have had to learn and will grow from it. I have spent the last ten months battling inner demons on a constant basis, putting on the brave “magic” face at work daily in an effort to mask what was going on at home. It was incredibly difficult, to feel like I had let my family down, and watching my closest relationships begin to disintegrate. On the other hand, however, I truly got to live a dream. I have been obsessed with all things Disney since I first set foot on this property as a young boy. The first movie I remember watching was “Snow White” and I still think the villains are the best part of any Disney / Pixar film. I showed up to my first day of kindergarten, amidst the pop culture hysteria of “The Lion King” (aging myself, but the original), wearing a Scar t-shirt. I stood out immediately amongst the crowd of Simba and Nala memorabilia, but I was comfortable marching to the beat of my own drum. If this assignment has taught me anything (believe me, it has taught me plenty), it is that we must be unapologetically ourselves in all aspects of our life. It is, indeed, too short to be anyone but you every second of every day. Forging our own paths and making each experience what we need it to be for ourselves is what life is all about. This translates to the military, as I begin to make that transition back into uniform and formations and last minute OPORDs and details and supervising 20 Soldiers for the first time ever in my career. Just because I have been told over and over again what my job will be and how it is best done, does not mean I have to do it that way. There are real problems we are facing in our country and in our military. If someone, like myself, does not begin doing the work now to fix those problems, who will? As I have mentioned previously, I am tenacious. I do not sit quietly in the shadows and bide my time, hoping something will change. I forge my own path. Now, however, I know that means weighing all the pros and cons, their effects on my life, my family, and those around me BEFORE making decisions. When I was younger in my career, I was able to just pull the trigger on a decision and, fortunately, it typically worked out for me. This largely was luck, rather than calculated planning and strategic decision-making. As I head into my first assignment as a senior NCO, I know that my leadership style must change. I have too many people to think about now to simply look out for myself first. I had planned an entirely different blog post before I sat down to write this. But I was walking the park and found a shirt in one of the merchandise locations that looked almost exactly like that infamous t-shirt I wore to my first day of kindergarten. It reminded me that I have always been an outsider, a weirdo, someone who is not afraid to speak his mind and make things happen, regardless of pushback. While I know enough now to temper that tenacity with a healthy dose of realism and respect for the consequences of my decisions, I remain that six-year-old boy: unafraid of what’s next because I know it will be whatever I make it to be. I urge you all to do the same. Nothing changes by remaining silent. If you see something with which you do not agree, say something about it. Remember also: the grass is only greener on the other side because you are not there to see it firsthand. Once you are there, the lighting shifts and the original side of the fence looks a lot more appealing. Live on the grass in which you are planted, and make it even better than that which you see across from you.

LEAVE A COMMENT

Public domain  .

This work, Assignment Complete: The Journey Concludes at the Happiest Place on Earth , by SFC Nicholas Nofziger , identified by DVIDS , must comply with the restrictions shown on https://www.dvidshub.net/about/copyright .

CONNECTED MEDIA

Assignment Complete: The Journey Concludes at the Happiest Place on Earth

MORE LIKE THIS

Controlled vocabulary keywords.

No keywords found.

  •   Register/Login to Download

DVIDS Control Center

Web Support

  • [email protected]
  • 1-888-743-4662
  • Links Disclaimer
  • No FEAR Act
  • Small Business Act
  • Open Government
  • Strategic Plan
  • Inspector General
  • Sexual Assault Prevention
  • DVI Records Schedule
  • DVI Executive Summary
  • Section 3103

Podcasts Logo

IMAGES

  1. Benefits of Using Strong Vocabulary in Assignment Writing

    vocabulary of assignment

  2. PPT

    vocabulary of assignment

  3. Vocabulary Chart Assignment.docx

    vocabulary of assignment

  4. Assignment Week 4

    vocabulary of assignment

  5. 1.02 Vocabulary

    vocabulary of assignment

  6. 44 Academic Words List in English Approach Respond Commit Select

    vocabulary of assignment

VIDEO

  1. Vocabulary Strategy Assignment

  2. The word families from WATCH ⋆༘˚⋆ #vocabulary#assignment

  3. English Assignment : 20 Vocabulary about Human Nature (Sifat Manusia)

  4. PLAY

  5. vocabulary building test assignment

  6. Vocabulary building_ Test Assignment_ " How to Learn English"

COMMENTS

  1. Assignment

    assignment: 1 n an undertaking that you have been assigned to do (as by an instructor) Types: show 6 types... hide 6 types... school assignment , schoolwork a school task performed by a student to satisfy the teacher writing assignment , written assignment an assignment to write something classroom project a school task requiring considerable ...

  2. Assignment Definition & Meaning

    The meaning of ASSIGNMENT is the act of assigning something. How to use assignment in a sentence. Synonym Discussion of Assignment.

  3. ASSIGNMENT

    ASSIGNMENT definition: 1. a piece of work given to someone, typically as part of their studies or job: 2. a job that…. Learn more.

  4. assignment noun

    Students are required to complete all homework assignments. You will need to complete three written assignments per semester. a business/special assignment ; I had set myself a tough assignment. on an assignment She is in Greece on an assignment for one of the Sunday newspapers. on assignment one of our reporters on assignment in China

  5. assignment noun

    Definition of assignment noun in Oxford Advanced American Dictionary. Meaning, pronunciation, picture, example sentences, grammar, usage notes, synonyms and more.

  6. ASSIGNMENT definition and meaning

    7 meanings: 1. something that has been assigned, such as a mission or task 2. a position or post to which a person is assigned.... Click for more definitions.

  7. assignment

    Word Combinations ( noun) part of speech: noun. definition 1: an assigned task, such as a job or lesson. Her English teacher gives more homework assignments than the other teachers. I did the reading assignment on Saturday and the math assignment on Sunday. Your first assignment is to report on the upcoming marathon. synonyms:

  8. assignment

    assignment meaning: a piece of work or job that you are given to do: . Learn more.

  9. ASSIGNMENT

    All you need to know about "ASSIGNMENT" in one place: definitions, pronunciations, synonyms, grammar insights, collocations, examples, and translations.

  10. assignment

    assignment - WordReference English dictionary, questions, discussion and forums. All Free.

  11. ASSIGNMENT definition in American English

    assignment in American English. (əˈsainmənt) noun. 1. something assigned, as a particular task or duty. She completed the assignment and went on to other jobs. 2. a position of responsibility, post of duty, or the like, to which one is appointed. He left for his assignment in the Middle East.

  12. assignment

    From Longman Business Dictionary assignment as‧sign‧ment / əˈsaɪnmənt / noun 1 [countable] a piece of work that someone is given My assignment was to save the company, whatever it took. 2 [uncountable] JOB when someone is given a particular job or task, or sent to work in a particular place or for a particular person With the agreement ...

  13. ASSIGNMENT

    ASSIGNMENT meaning: 1. a piece of work given to someone, typically as part of their studies or job: 2. a job that…. Learn more.

  14. Designing Essay Assignments

    discuss the assignment in class when you give it, so students can see that you take it seriously, so they can ask questions about it, so they can have it in mind during subsequent class discussions; introduce the analytic vocabulary of your assignment into class discussions, and take opportunities to note relevant moves made in discussion or ...

  15. Assignment Vocabulary

    enumerate - to write in list or outline form, giving points concisely one by one. identify - to determine the classification or existence of something; make known. indicate - to point out or show evidence. list (as in "enumerate,") - to write an itemized series of concise statements. mention - to speak of, say, to name or specify ...

  16. Assign

    assign: 1 v select something or someone for a specific purpose "The teacher assigned him to lead his classmates in the exercise" Synonyms: set apart , specify Types: dedicate set apart to sacred uses with solemn rites, of a church detail assign to a specific task Type of: choose , pick out , select , take pick out, select, or choose from a ...

  17. ASSIGNMENT

    ASSIGNMENT definition: a piece of work or job that you are given to do: . Learn more.

  18. 11 Vocabulary Homework Ideas And How To Motivate Students To ...

    Now you can! Create a vocabulary test using all the words in a variety of different types of questions. Make sure to create the answer key to the test as well. Download the 7 Options for Vocabulary Homework bundle and have students keep the selection sheet in their binders. Now they have seven weeks of vocabulary homework assignments!

  19. Assignment Definition & Meaning

    Assignment definition: The act of assigning. True to my assignment, I recorded movements and time until Quinn's voice from below broke the silence.

  20. assignment

    Assign this list to your students. Start a free 10-day teacher trial to engage your students in all of Vocabulary.com's word learning activities. Set up fun Vocab Jams, create a quiz, and monitor each student's progress. Start your free teacher trial. Learn more about how Vocabulary.com supports educators across the country.

  21. Understanding Assignments

    What this handout is about. The first step in any successful college writing venture is reading the assignment. While this sounds like a simple task, it can be a tough one. This handout will help you unravel your assignment and begin to craft an effective response. Much of the following advice will involve translating typical assignment terms ...

  22. Assignment Definition & Meaning

    1. : a job or duty that is given to someone : a task someone is required to do. [count] My assignment was to clean the equipment. = They gave me the assignment of cleaning the equipment. The students were given a homework assignment. The reporter's assignment is to interview the candidate. The reporter is here on an assignment.

  23. Assignments Feature

    Assignments Feature. You can directly assign individual resources by selecting the Assign button. Choose from four assignment options: Sequenced, Intervention, Student Choice, or Review. Sequenced: Select Vocabulary, Spelling, or Phonics to receive a sequenced assignment of five category-specific games, beginning with instruction and concluding ...

  24. DVIDS

    As part of the Training with Industry (TW) Program, Sgt. 1st Class Nofziger chose to complete a bi-monthly blog series documenting his journey. As the first TWI Communications Fellow at Disneyland ...