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SAT Essay Prompts: The Complete List

SAT Writing , SAT Essay

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On every SAT Essay, you'll have to read an argument meant to persuade a broad audience and discuss how well the author argues his or her point. The passage you'll have to read will change from test to test, but you'll always need to analyze the author's argument and write a coherent and organized essay explaining this analysis.

In this article, we've compiled a list of the 14 real SAT essay prompts that the College Board has released (either in The Official SAT Study Guide or separately online) for the new SAT. This is the most comprehensive set of new SAT essay prompts online today.

At the end of this article, we'll also guide you through how to get the most out of these prompts and link to our expert resources on acing the SAT essay. I'll discuss how the SAT essay prompts are valuable not just because they give you a chance to write a practice essay, but because of what they reveal about the essay task itself.

UPDATE: SAT Essay No Longer Offered

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In January 2021, the College Board announced that after June 2021, it would no longer offer the Essay portion of the SAT (except at schools who opt in during School Day Testing). It is now no longer possible to take the SAT Essay, unless your school is one of the small number who choose to offer it during SAT School Day Testing.

While most colleges had already made SAT Essay scores optional, this move by the College Board means no colleges now require the SAT Essay. It will also likely lead to additional college application changes such not looking at essay scores at all for the SAT or ACT, as well as potentially requiring additional writing samples for placement.

What does the end of the SAT Essay mean for your college applications? Check out our article on the College Board's SAT Essay decision for everything you need to know.

SAT essay prompts always keep to the same basic format. Not only is the prompt format consistent from test to test, but what you're actually asked to do (discuss how an author builds an argument) also remains the same across different test administrations.

The College Board's predictability with SAT essay helps students focus on preparing for the actual analytical task, rather than having to think up stuff on their feet. Every time, before the passage, you'll see the following:

  • evidence, such as facts or examples, to support claims.
  • reasoning to develop ideas and to connect claims and evidence.
  • stylistic or persuasive elements, such as word choice or appeals to emotion, to add power to the ideas expressed.

And after the passage, you'll see this:

"Write an essay in which you explain how [the author] builds an argument to persuade [her/his] audience that [whatever the author is trying to argue for]. In your essay, analyze how [the author] uses one or more of the features listed in the box above (or features of your own choice) to strengthen the logic and persuasiveness of his argument. Be sure that your analysis focuses on the most relevant features of the passage.

Your essay should not explain whether you agree with [the author]'s claims, but rather explain how [the author] builds an argument to persuade [her/his/their] audience."

Now that you know the format, let's look at the SAT essay prompts list.

14 Official SAT Essay Prompts

The College Board has released a limited number of prompts to help students prep for the essay. We've gathered them for you here, all in one place. We'll be sure to update this article as more prompts are released for practice and/or as more tests are released.

SPOILER ALERT : Since these are the only essay prompts that have been released so far, you may want to be cautious about spoiling them for yourself, particularly if you are planning on taking practice tests under real conditions . This is why I've organized the prompts by the 10 that are in the practice tests (so you can avoid them if need be), the ones that are available online as sample prompts, and the ones that are in the text of the Official SAT Study Guide (Redesigned SAT), all online for free.

Practice Test Prompts

These 10 prompts are taken from the practice tests that the College Board has released.

Practice Test 1 :

"Write an essay in which you explain how Jimmy Carter builds an argument to persuade his audience that the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge should not be developed for industry."

Practice Test 2 :

"Write an essay in which you explain how Martin Luther King Jr. builds an argument to persuade his audience that American involvement in the Vietnam War is unjust."

Practice Test 3 :

"Write an essay in which you explain how Eliana Dockterman builds an argument to persuade her audience that there are benefits to early exposure to technology."

Practice Test 4 :

"Write an essay in which you explain how Paul Bogard builds an argument to persuade his audience that natural darkness should be preserved."

Practice Test 5 :

"Write an essay in which you explain how Eric Klinenberg builds an argument to persuade his audience that Americans need to greatly reduce their reliance on air-conditioning."

Practice Test 6 :

"Write an essay in which you explain how Christopher Hitchens builds an argument to persuade his audience that the original Parthenon sculptures should be returned to Greece."

Practice Test 7 :

"Write an essay in which you explain how Zadie Smith builds an argument to persuade her audience that public libraries are important and should remain open"

Practice Test 8 :

"Write an essay in which you explain how Bobby Braun builds an argument to persuade his audience that the US government must continue to invest in NASA."

Practice Test 9 :

"Write an essay in which you explain how Todd Davidson builds an argument to persuade his audience that the US government must continue to fund national parks."

Practice Test 10 :

"Write an essay in which you explain how Richard Schiffman builds an argument to persuade his audience that Americans need to work fewer hours."

Special note: The prompt for Practice Test 4 also appears on the College Board's site with real sample essays written in response. If you've written a practice essay for practice test 4 and want to see what essays of different score levels look like for that particular prompt, you can go there and look at eight real student essays.

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Free Online Practice

This prompt comes from the College Board website .

"Write an essay in which you explain how Dana Gioia builds an argument to persuade his audience that the decline of reading in America will have a negative effect on society."

This prompt comes from Khan Academy , where it is listed as an alternate essay prompt to go along with Practice Test 2:

"Write an essay in which you explain how Leo W. Gerard builds an argument to persuade his audience that American colleges and universities should be affordable for all students."

The Official SAT Study Guide 2020

The Official SAT Study Guide (editions published in 2015 and later available online for free) contains all 10 of the previously mentioned practice tests at the end of the book. In the section about the new SAT essay , however, there are two additional sample essay prompts (accompanied by articles to analyze).

Sample Prompt 1:

"Write an essay in which you explain how Peter S. Goodman builds an argument to persuade his audience that news organizations should increase the amount of professional foreign news coverage provided to people in the United States."

Sample Prompt 2:

"Write an essay in which you explain how Adam B. Summers builds an argument to persuade his audience that plastic shopping bags should not be banned."

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How Do You Get the Most Out of These Prompts?

Now that you have all the prompts released by the College Board, it's important to know the best way to use them. Make sure you have a good balance between quality and quantity, and don't burn through all 14 of the real prompts in a row— take the time to learn from your experiences writing the practice essays.

Step By Step Guide on How to Practice Using the Article

#1: Understand how the SAT essay is graded .

#2: Follow along as we write a high-scoring SAT essay, step by step .

#3: Plan a set of features you'll look for in the SAT essay readings and practice writing about them fluidly. This doesn't just mean identifying a technique, like asking a rhetorical question, but explaining why it is persuasive and what effect it has on the reader in the context of a particular topic. We have more information on this step in our article about 6 SAT persuasive devices you can use .

#4: Choose a prompt at random from above, or choose a topic that you think is going to be hard for you to detach from (because you'll want to write about the topic, rather than the argument) set timer to 50 minutes and write the essay. No extra time allowed!

#5: Grade the essay, using the official essay rubric to give yourself a score out of 8 in the reading, analysis, and writing sections.

#6: Repeat steps 4 and 5. Choose the prompts you think will be the hardest for you so that you can so that you're prepared for the worst when the test day comes

#7: If you run out of official prompts to practice with, use the official prompts as models to find examples of other articles you could write about . Start by looking for op-ed articles in online news publications like The New York Times, The Atlantic, LA Times , and so on. For instance, the passage about the plastic bag ban in California (Official SAT Study Guide sample essay prompt 2, above) has a counterpoint here —you could try analyzing and writing about that article as well.

Any additional articles you use for practice on the SAT essay must match the following criteria:

  • ideally 650-750 words , although it'll be difficult to find an op-ed piece that's naturally that short. Try to aim for nothing longer than 2000 words, though, or the scope of the article is likely to be wider than anything you'll encounter on the SAT.
  • always argumentative/persuasive . The author (or authors) is trying to get readers to agree with a claim or idea being put forward.
  • always intended for a wide audience . All the information you need to deconstruct the persuasiveness of the argument is in the passage. This means that articles with a lot of technical jargon that's not explained in the article are not realistic passage to practice with.

What's Next?

We've written a ton of helpful resources on the SAT essay. I f you're just getting started, we recommend beginning with our top SAT essay tips for a quick overview of the essay task and what you need to know.

A little more familiar with the SAT essay but still not quite sure how to write one? Follow along with our step-by-step guide to writing the SAT essay .

Looking to earn a high score? Learn what it takes to get the highest score possible on the SAT essay here .

Plus, if you want a reference linking you to all of our great articles on the SAT essay, be sure to check out our ultimate SAT essay guide .

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Laura graduated magna cum laude from Wellesley College with a BA in Music and Psychology, and earned a Master's degree in Composition from the Longy School of Music of Bard College. She scored 99 percentile scores on the SAT and GRE and loves advising students on how to excel in high school.

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Grade my essay pls

Hey I’ve written this practice essay and I’ll be very grateful if someone graded it. This is the article- https://cdn.kastatic.org/KA-share/sat/sat-practice-test-9-essay.pdf . Here’s the essay-

In his article, “Why We Should Work Less”, Richard Schiffman argues in favor of relaxing the work-hours of average Americans. He depicts the destructive of the current system through personal anecdotes; refutes counter arguments using clear facts; strengthens his claim by providing relevant data.

Schiffman dives right into the issue by telling us two brief anecdotes that effectively portray the hardships that American workers have to go through because of the current culture of long work-hours. For instance, he says that one of his friends, “…is routinely forced to work late and at home on weekends- often without pay…”. He talks about another friend whose job was “killing” her as “…she takes her work home with her, which has taken a toll on her personal life, health, and sleep.” These anecdotes allow Schiffman to raise the issue in a way that draws the attention of the readers and set up a foundation for the facts and data that follow. Moreover, they allow those who have faced similar conditions to emotionally connect with Schiffman’s words and the unfamiliar ones to catch a glimpse of the real picture.

In the following paragraphs Schiffman refutes counter-arguments with facts and observations. For example, opponents of lenient work-hours claim that “…grueling work schedules are necessary to boost productivity” and use the troubles of US economy to justify their argument. However, Schiffman effectively counters the claim by providing a strong fact that “Americans already work hundreds of hours a year more than their counterparts in other developed countries.” Schiffman also shows that “…corporate greed, one created by financial entities” is responsible for the depressing US economy by notifying the readers of the soaring corporate profitability and worker productivity. These facts totally refute Schiffman’s opposing defenses. Furthermore, they help the readers realize that shortening work-hours is possible without major drawbacks. Schiffman also goes on to tell us about the positive effects of shorter workweeks that allow the readers to see his claims as beneficial. This also backup Schiffman’s claim logically.

Finally, Schiffman provides results of relevant studies that appeals to the readers’ sense of logos. For example, he tells us “…nearly half of Americans surveyed in 2004 by the Center for a New American Dream said that they would be willing to accept a smaller paycheck in return for more time with their families…”. Schiffman furthers his claim by talking about another study that estimates a decline of 20% in energy consumption if US was to emulate workweeks of Western Europe. If we look at how the data contributes to the overall article, we see that they provide a logical and statistical basis to all of Schiffman’s previous paragraphs. In fact, thee results leave very little for doubt and counter-arguments in the mind of the reader. The final paragraphs provide a fitting crescendo that drives Schiffman’s point home.

In conclusion, Schiffman reasons in favors of lenient work-hours and establishes it as logical and beneficial. He does so by mostly appealing to the readers’ sense of reason through anecdotes, facts, and empirical evidence.

I cannot grade your essay, but I can offer a few suggestions.

Overall, I find your writing to be a bit confusing. Try to create a more clear and concise presentation.

First: Rethink using the word “relaxing” in the first sentence of your essay. Consider using “reducing” instead of “relaxing”.

Second: Your introductory paragraph fails to share why Schiffman thinks that Americans should work fewer hours. You attempt to do so, but your attempt is unclear.

Third: The first sentence of your second paragraph is weak because it is not concise. Consider:

Schiffman illustrates the problems caused by working long hours through the use of two brief anecdotes.

Fourth: In your third paragraph, the fourth sentence confuses the reader. This is due to your lack of understanding what Schiffman deems to be the “crisis”.

Schiffman identifies the “crisis” as an unsustainable drive for increasing corporate growth and profits at the expense of the long term health (stability) of the economy and of the long term health of workers.

Fifth: The fifth sentence of the third paragraph is meaningless.

Sixth: Your concluding paragraph needs to be more firm in its statement of Schiffman’s position. To do so, simply substitute the word “reduced” for “lenient”.

In conclusion, by the use of anecdotes, facts, and empirical evidence, Schiffman argues that reduced work hours will result in long-term benefits for the planet, the health of workers, and for the stability and sustainability of the economy.

These edits try to retain as much of your words and phrases as possible in an effort to make your writing more clear. This is just the first round of edits. You need to incorporate them into your current work, then revise that work product.

I did not address all issues in need of editing. I just want to point you in the right direction in an effort to create a more clear and more concise writing.

Thank you very much

How’s this?

In his article, “Why We Should Work Less”, Richard Schiffman argues that work-hours of average Americans should be reduced as doing so would be beneficial for the workers, the economy, and the country as a whole. He builds his argument using personal anecdotes, facts, and relevant data.

Schiffman starts his article off with two personal anecdotes that illustrate the problems caused by working long hours. For instance, he talks of a friend who is “routinely forced to work late and at home on weekends-often without pay”. He talks about another friend whose job was “killing” her as she “takes her work home with her which has taken a toll on her personal life, health, and sleep.” Sharing these real-life examples, Schiffman draws in his readers and establishes working long hours as harmful for the workers. Moreover, the anecdotes allow the readers to see the real picture of working conditions in America.

Schiffman takes his argument further, providing facts that outline the benefits of working less and refutes counter-arguments. For example, opponents of reducing work hours argue that “grueling work schedules are necessary to boost productivity”. But the fact that “Americans work already work hundreds of hours a year more than their counterparts in developed countries” counters that argument effectively. Schiffman also states the benefits of shorter work weeks through fact like, “Historically, shorter workweek have been as large a creator of new jobs as market growth”. In doing so, Schiffman strengthens his claim and shows the positive impacts of shortening work hours. Besides, the comparison of Americans’ work hours and work hours of other developed countries compel the readers to reconsider the relation between development and work hours. This helps readers realize emulating lenient work hours is possible without serious drawbacks.

In conclusion, by using anecdotes, facts, and empirical evidence, Schiffman argues in favor of reducing work hours. Appealing mostly to the reader’s sense of reason, Schiffman establishes reducing work hours as beneficial for the people, the country, and the planet.

Much better !

However, I am not sure about the last sentence of paragraph #3 and the use of the word “lenient.” Do you think that “diminished” might be a more accurate word ?

OP: The strength of your revised essay lies in the clarity of the introductory & concluding paragraphs and in the clarity & conciseness of each introductory sentence in all 5 paragraphs. This makes it easy for readers to understand your points and position.

The are some areas in your revised version which need attention.

For example: The second & third sentences of paragraph three reveal that you have not grasped an important point in Schiffman’s position. Schiffman cautions that the demands fueled by corporate greed which require ever increasing productivity and profits is unsustainable, therefore the negative effects on the lives of workers’ lives and health is not worthwhile even though it can be justified by increased productivity and profits.

Schiffman then cleverly points out that a reduction in work hours will result in higher employment rates and that higher rates of employment lead to a healthier economy due to stability and sustainability.

Yeah I think ‘diminished’ isn’t a bad choice. But ‘lenient’ kind of sounds better in my head, I don’t know why. Why do you think ‘lenient’ is less accurate?

I’ve seen some high-scoring SAT essays that leave out some of the discussions of the writer. Like in this one- https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/sat/new-sat-tips-planning/about-the-sat-essay/a/sat-essay-high-scoring-student-example . Here the student leaves out quite a few things the writer talks about, like the adverse effects of light pollution on our health. So I tried to write about the parts of the article that I thought would be easier for me to write about. Do you think I left out the more relevant parts of Schiffman’s article?

I also used KhanAcademy’s essay scoring AI on this essay. They didn’t give me good marks ;-;. Could you help me get better marks?

The definition of “lenient” = merciful; gentle.

“Lenient” has no relation whatsoever to Schiffman’s article.

“Lenient” is similar to “mild” or “tolerant”. None of these words relate to Schiffman’s writing.

P.S. You left out the most important point in Schiffman’s article which is that the demands for higher productivity & higher profits resulting from increased working hours fueled by corporate greed is unsustainable.

You also wrote inaccurate & incomplete thoughts.

Overall, the Schiffman piece is not an easy article to grasp after a single reading so please do not be discouraged.

Okay. Thanks again.

Wrote another essay. I’d be grateful if you gave me some suggestions.

https://cdn.kastatic.org/KA-share/sat/5LS03E%20Practice%20Essay.pdf

In response to the growing pressures on the California state senate to ban plastic bags, Adam B. Summers builds an argument to defend the people’s “right to make fundamental decisions as ‘Paper or Plastic?’”. He builds a compelling argument through skillful use of relevant data, historical evidence, and a strong word choice.

Summers starts off his article with a strategy that is an appeal to ethos as well as logos. He uses data that establish the negative impacts of banning plastic bags and the benefits of not doing so. According to the author, banning plastic bags would have “prohibited grocery stores and convenience stores with at least $2 million in gross annual sales.” He also mentions that grocery bags “make up 0.3 percent of this[1.6 percent of all municipal solid waste] total.” This approach establishes Summers’ research and expertise on the issue. Furthermore, it makes the argument more convincing as well as reasonable. The data gives the argument a more logical basis as well. Moreover, Summers’ data allow the readers to realize the potential benefits of Summer’s claim. If the readers see the author’s claim as beneficial and the opposing claims as harmful, then they will be more likely to side with him.

Summers furthers his argument with masterful use of historical evidence. He refers to the past consequences of banning plastic bags. This strategy bolsters his argument by highlighting the potential hazards of the ban. Summer mentions “San Francisco’s plastic bag ban in 2007,” which “resulted in a spike in hospital emergency room visits due to…intestinal infectious diseases…the ban even accounts for several deaths in the city each year.” He mentions the results of Ireland’s step of increasing taxes on plastic bags. This strategy strengthens the writer’s stance by providing evidence to his claim and, again, makes him more convincing. In addition, the historical context also makes the argument more engaging as well as persuasive. This technique also appeals to the readers’ sense of reason: the readers can inductively reason and follow the pattern of consequences and realize Summer’s point.

Lastly, a strong word choice throughout the article strengthens Summers’ authoritative stance on the issue. He depicts the advocates of the bill on discussion to be “not content to tell us how much our toilets can flush or what type of light bulb to use to brighten our homes.” He also refers to the bill as “nanny-state regulation.” In doing so, Summers strengthens his authoritative stance on the issue. This technique also makes the argument more likely to prompt action among the readers. On the other hand, it challenges the readers’ perception of the issue: those who oppose his claim will be more likely to think twice now.

In conclusion, Adam B. Summers builds a strong argument against banning plastic bags in his article “Bag Ban Bad for Freedom and Environment.” He portrays how the bill negatively impacts the planet and individual freedom. He builds a complete argument, with the full circle of ethos, pathos, and logos, with frequent use of data, historical evidence, and a strong word choice.

And another one. Thanks a ton, in advance. Any feedback from anyone is welcome too. Something was wrong with the link of the article. I pasted it first. My essay comes later.

“Government Must Preserve National Parks” Adapted from Todd Davidson ©2014 by Capitol Hill Publishing Corp. Originally published in The Hill, September 18, 2013.

The world has an enduring love affair with America’s national parks. Conceived nearly 100 years ago, national parks connect us with our shared heritage and tell our nation’s stories. Who among us has stared into the deep blue caldera of Crater Lake, looked up at Half Dome as the special time of winter approaches in the Yosemite Valley, or witnessed the spectacular October fall colors of red maples, oaks and hickories in the forests of the Great Smoky Mountains and not been overcome by the incredible, almost magical grandeur that has been preserved for us and future generations?

Collectively, our national parks, monuments, seashores, recreation areas, historic sites, military parks, battlefields and heritage areas represent the very best our nation has to offer. Along with their intrepid and iconic Park Rangers, they embody the true spirit of our country, bringing our nation’s history to life.

In addition to being stunning and educational, national parks are immensely affordable destinations for American families and are top U.S. tourist attractions. Each year, nearly 300 million people visit one or more of America’s 401 national parks, ranging from educational Civil War battlefields to awe-inspiring places like Yellowstone, Acadia National Park and the Grand Canyon. These park visitors are a significant component of the U.S. tourism economy. They stay in nearby hotels, rent cars, dine at local restaurants, buy at retail shops and visit other neighboring attractions, generating more than $30 billion in spending and supporting a quarter-million jobs. National parks are clearly a winning economic scenario for visitors, the economies of nearby towns and communities and ultimately our nation.

But now, these prolific economic engines are at risk. Over the last decade, national park budgets have seen a steady decline in funding, and currently suffer from an annual operations shortfall of more than $500 million. The National Park Service budget for construction and maintenance is only half of the amount necessary to maintain park sewer systems, roofs, foundations and road surfaces.

The sequester1 cut another $153 million to national park budgets. Before Congress left for recess, each chamber shared a funding proposal with completely opposite visions for our national parks: one that cuts even deeper, affecting rangers, visitor centers and campgrounds, and another that would get our parks on the road to recovery. Through the across-the-board sequester cuts, parks have fewer rangers to protect and maintain historic sites and greet visitors, minimized visitor center hours, closed campgrounds, restrooms and picnic areas and reduced road and trail maintenance that is essential for park accessibility and enjoyment.

There is an irony to all this, because national parks are one of the best investments this country has ever made. In addition to supporting the U.S. travel and tourism industry, which is a cornerstone of the U.S. economy that represents $1.8 trillion in economic output and supports 14 million American jobs, every dollar invested in the National Park Service generates $10 in economic activity. National parks are veritable economic engines critical to supporting the livelihood of businesses and communities across the country.

Last year, President Obama called for a national travel and tourism strategy to make the United States the world’s top travel and tourism destination, as part of a comprehensive effort to spur job creation. The White House released the strategy just over a year ago—an important step that officially elevates the travel and tourism industry to what it should be: a national priority. It also recognizes the industry for its fundamental contribution to our economy, national security and public diplomacy.

Our national parks can play an important role in making the U.S. a top travel destination. As the National Park System approaches its centennial in 2016, there should be a robust national park centennial initiative to help attract international visitors and provide needed support for our national parks to flourish into the next century.

1 A cut in spending by the federal government

Here’s my essay:

In his article, Todd Davidson builds an argument to support the fact the “Government Must Preserve National Parks.” He portrays the significance of national parks in the country’s tourism sector, economy, and the lives of Americans. He does so through skillful use of rhetorical questions, relevant data, and a strong word choice.

Davidson starts off his article with a series of rhetorical questions that appeal to the readers’ sense of pathos. He compels his readers to reminisce the time when they “stared into the deep blue caldera of Crater Lake, looked up at Half Dome as the winter approaches in the Yosemite Valley, or witnessed the spectacular October fall colors of red maples, oaks hickories.” By doing so, the writer approaches the issue in a way that plays to the emotions of the readers. It helps the overall argument by establishing the “magical grandeur” of national parks that “has been preserved for us and future generations.” As for the readers, this approach is certain spur emotions in their hearts. Through this strategy Davidson successfully completes his first step towards building a strong argument, appealing to pathos.

Davidson furthers his argument with an extensive use of facts and data that help bolster his point by proving national parks to be beneficial. He reminds his readers that “national parks connect us[Americans] with our shared heritage and tell our nation’s stories.” He points out that “every dollar invested in the National Park Service generates $10 in economic activity.” Davidson’s facts establish the emotional and economical importance of National Parks in America. This also strengthens his professorial stance on the issue as the data clearly demonstrate Davidson’s research and expertise on the issue. In addition, the argument now has a logical basis and is more convincing. The readers can also realize the importance of investing in national parks. Every one of the author’s facts and numbers add to the logical power of Davidson’s argument making it more reasonable and persuasive. This strategy not only strengthens the author’s ethos but also appeals to the readers’ sense of logos.

Finally, Davidson adds guttural power to his argument with the help of a strong word choice. He tells his readers that “national parks…represent the very best our[Americans] has to offer.” He writes that national parks “embody the true spirit of our country[America]. bringing our[Americans] history to life.” Davidson’s diction demonstrates his creative prowess and his power to captivate his readers. The argument is engaging and more likely to prompt action largely because of the strong choice of words. This outstanding use of words help the readers to really connect with Davidson’s claim and comprehend the significance of investing in national parks.

In conclusion, Todd Davidson does an outstanding job of advocating for Government regulated preservation of national parks. He builds a compelling and captivating argument through masterful use of rhetorical questions, facts, and a strong word choice.

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The bourgeois charm of Siberia's oil capital

todd davidson sat essay

If you’re driving west across Russia from the Pacific Ocean, the first thing that you notice upon entering the city of Tyumen is the McDonalds. Tyumen has long been one of the only Siberian cities with a McDonalds restaurant. Although the fast-food giant has plans to open locations in nearby Novosibirsk and other regional cities, Siberia still contains one of the longest distances on earth outside of Africa where you can remain on a major highway and not see a McDonalds. Until you reach Tyumen, that is.

A stop in Tyumen provides an interesting glimpse into how modern Russia’s oil revenue has influenced Siberia’s oldest Russian city. Tyumen is a great stopover point on the Trans-Siberian Railroad and a short ride from Yekaterinburg (five hours) or Tobolsk (four hours).

In the 16th century, Russia started expanding eastward into parts of Central Asia ruled by the Tatars, an Islamic people who still live thoughout Russia. A band of Cossacks wrested control of Tyumen from the Tatars in 1580. Six years later, Russians established a fort in Tyumen on the Tura River.

For centuries, Tyumen vied with the nearby city of Tobolsk—once the official capital of Siberia—for the prestige of the region’s most important city. Tyumen won in the end, when the Trans-Siberian Railroad bypassed Tobolsk and was routed through this now oil-rich city.

Tyumen played an important role in Russian history during times of war. At the beginning of the Russian Civil War, the Bolshevik Red Army slowly pushed the White Army, commanded by Admiral Alexander Kolchak, into Siberia. Kolchak and his anti-Bolshevik forces holed up in Tyumen until the Red Army overtook them in January of 1918.

During the Second World War, many Russian industries were moved away from the front to Siberian cities. Tyumen had already become an industrial capital during the early Soviet era, and the city became an ideal spot to relocate Russia’s western factories. As Nazi forces approached Russia in 1941, the embalmed body of Vladimir Lenin was sent from the Lenin Mausoleum in Moscow’s Red Square by train to the Tyumen State Agricultural Academy for safekeeping. In 1945, Lenin’s body was shipped back to Moscow.

Some of the factories relocated to Tyumen during wartime remained in the city. The discovery of oil in the region catapulted Siberia’s oldest Russian settlement to further prosperity. Modern Tyumen is a vibrant city with a number of universities and a revamped center well-suited for exploration by foot.

Start your walking tour around central Tyumen on Ulitsa Respubliki. The city’s main drag has fine pedestrian walkways and leads wanderers past an impressive collection of tsarist-era buildings that recall Tyumen’s importance in the beginning of Russia’s colonization of Siberia.

From the southeastern end of Ul. Respubliki, head north toward the Tura River and take a brief side trip onto Ul. Ordzhonikidze to visit the Fine Arts Museum (47 Ul. Ordzhonikidze) which houses exhibits of classical Russian and Soviet art as well as traditional bone carving and works produced by the native people who live in the far north of Tyumen Oblast.

Back on Ul. Respubliki, you’ll soon see the city’s requisite Lenin statue by the local government buildings. A block away, opposite Lenin, is Tyumen’s city park, a delightful place to walk or hop on one of its amusement rides.

Most Siberian cities developed under the watchful eyes of the atheist Soviet regime and churches are usually not Siberia’s strongpoint. But this isn’t true in four-centuries-old Tyumen. Strolling up Ul. Respubliki, you’ll soon come to the Church of the Saviour (41 Ul. Lenina) and the Znamensky Cathedral (13 Ul. Semakova). Each of these stunning Baroque-influenced churches are located right off Ul. Respubliki and were built in the late 18th century.

Tyumen is also famous for its historic wooden houses. Heading further up Ul. Respubliki, stop to wander around some of the side streets and snap photos of these ornate wooden structures which provide a glimpse back in time. Near the Tura River, you’ll pass a civil war monument in remembrance of the Tyumen natives who died fighting the White Army and the Tyumen State Agricultural Academy (7 Ul. Respubliki) an impressive building in its own right where Lenin was stored during the Second World War.

Near the end of Ul. Respubliki, take a walk over the Tura River on the Lover’s Bridge, a suspension bridge open to foot traffic only that has become one of Tyumen’s iconic sights. The other side of the river is a great place to see more of Tyumen’s signature wooden houses as well as take in the churches scattered around the city center.

Save the best for last and visit the Trinity Monastery (10 Ul. Kommunisticheskaya) at the end of Ul. Respubliki. A white wall surrounds the monastery, giving it the appearance of a mini-kremlin, and the golden onion domes of the 18th century churches within should not be missed.

Although navigating Tyumen is straightforward enough, the St. Petersburg-based travel company OSTWEST can arrange a city tour in Tyumen and the surrounding countryside.

All rights reserved by Rossiyskaya Gazeta.

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Trans Siberian

todd davidson sat essay

  • COUNTRY Russia
  • POPULATION 600,000
  • LANGUAGES Russian
  • TIMEZONE UTC +5
  • NOTABLE LANDMARKS Trinity Monastery; Voznesensko Georgievskiy Church
  • Getting Around
  • Sightseeing

Tyumen, the first Russian settlement in Siberia, lies 2,500km (1,600 mi) east of Moscow and behind the Ural Mountains. The Tyumen Oblast (region) has seen significant economic growth over the past twenty years, fuelled by the discovery and exploitation of significant oil fields.

Tyumen is also an educational centre, with more than forty thousand students.

Originally Tyumen was called Chimgi-Tura and its origins probably lay with the merchants from the ancient trade centres of Samarkand and Bukhara, who needed Siberian rivers to transport their goods to northern markets. For a long time Chimgi-Tura was the capital of Tyumen Khanate, which was a part of the Mongol Golden Horde Empire. With time Chimgi-Tura was renamed Tyumen, a Mongol word meaning “Ten thousand people.”

Russian Tyumen was established in 1586, when the first military mission sponsored by the Tsar and led by Ermak, mainly to respond frequent attacks of Khan Kuchum, seized the town. It then remained a quiet provincial Siberian city up until the 1960s. Most of its inhabitants lived in wooden houses along the Tura and Tyumenka rivers, for which it became known as the “capital of villages.”

Being a major transportation point to Eastern Siberia and the Russian Far East, Tyumen has experienced all major historical events in Russia. It has seen the Decembrists on their way to exile in Irkutsk, Tsar Nicholas II and his family to their final destination of Ekaterinburg, Revolution turmoil, Civil War, bloody uprisings against the new Bolshevik food policy ( prodrazverstka ), Gulag prisoners, and more. Many famous people were born or studied in Tyumen. Among them is the famous writer M. M. Prishvin. His essays about nature are filled with harmony and the art of words.

One resident was the most controversial figure in Russian history – Grigory Rasputin. His house can be visited in the village of Pokrovskoe, near Tyumen. It is believed that “the devil monk” was born sometime between 1864 and 1872.

Rasputin was an impoverished, drunken, dirty and foul-mouthed man. Even so, people claim that he had great powers. Many said that he was a healer and also a prophet. During his twenties, Rasputin supposedly became a holy man after a long religious conversation with one of his superiors. He lived off the charity of people who admired his asceticism. It is said that one time Rasputin accurately predicted a three month drought. This Siberian mystic arrived in St Petersburg in 1911 and within a few years had become one of the most influential men in government circles.

Tyumen is a city for walking, a city of contrasts. There are two main streets in the centre: Republics and Lenin. Amongst wooden houses and old churches you will see the modern glass buildings of the World Trade Centre and the Law Department of Tyumen State University as well as Soviet style neighbourhoods with multi-storey apartment buildings.

Optional Sightseeing

The historic city of Tobolsk, Siberia’s former capital, displays considerable charm to reward a short detour from Tyumen. The sights include the white-walled 18th-century Kremlin, incorporating the 17th century St Sofia Cathedral, and a weatherbeaten old town described by some as ‘wonderfully dilapidated’.

Winter in Tyumen

The winters are cold in Tyumen and outlying regions. However, they have one attraction that helps to cope with the winter, being open air hot springs. Thousands of people gather there, both locals and visitors from as far as Yekaterinburg and Moscow. this is truly a way to experience the contrast of the cold Siberian winter (-20℃ plus or minus) with the hot spring water (55℃).

It can be fun to change to your swimwear in the car and then dash to the water (100 m) from the parking area. Just taking a few steps out of the water means the water residue on your body turns into solid ice instantly. Good therapeutic skin pore treatment, we are told.

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In response to federal government budget cuts amid the economic prosperity that national parks bring to the United States, Todd Davidson writes a compelling and purposeful argument to support the claim that national parks must be preserved by the federal government through funding. To elaborate on his claim, Davidson uses a variety of techniques such as imagery, statistics, and logical reasoning.

When Davidson initiates his argument, he employs imagery as a literary technique to engage his audience. He writes vivid details about well-known national parks such as the "deep blue caldera of Blue Lake" and the October colours of "red maples" and "oaks" in the Great Smoky Mountains' forests. To clarify, Davidson uses examples of America's national park to invoke vivid imagery into the readers' mind. Not only does this engage the reader by encouraging them to visualize the natural beauty of national parks, it strengthens Davidson's argument by making it more appealing to the readers' senses by invoking tranquility and pleasure in his audience.

Another technique that Todd Davidson uses in his essay is statistics. Davidson utilizes data about the economic impact of national parks to inform the reader of the economic benefits that investing and maintaining America's national parks provide. He tells readers that one dollar funded towards the National Park Service results in "$10 in economic activity" and that national parks support the tourism industry, an essential industry in the American economy that "supports 14 million jobs." As readers read the statistics provided by Davidson, they understand that Davidson employs these statistics to insinuate that investing in national parks is beneficial for the American economy, which supports his main claim by giving the audience a specific reason for why national parks should be preserved. By implementing these facts into his article, his readers find his argument to be more trustworthy and honest because there is only objectivity that is manifested in his supporting evidence. Therefore, the statistical evidence Davidson uses validates his argument and increases the probability that the audience will agree with his viewpoint.

Ultimately, Todd Davidson uses logical reasoning as his last strategy to convince readers that the federal government should continue preserving national parks. After Davidson presents the economic advantages of investing in national parks, he laments at recent budget cuts that Congress enacted. He describes the budget cuts as an "irony" because they are "one of the best investments" America has made. With sufficient statistics to back up his claims, Davidson elaborates on his claims by expressing concern about an issue that can be solved with common sense. Furthermore, Davidson understands that many of his audience know the economic benefits of investing in national parks by reading his article. By calling the budgets cuts enacted by Congress ironic, Davidson further validates his argument by encouraging his audience to question the rationale of the government's actions and prefer rational thinking about the issue that is provided by Davidson.

In the article, "Government Must Preserve National Parks", Todd Davidson argues that the federal government should continue to support funding national parks because it supports major American industries, increases economic growth, and provides magnificent imagery for visitors to see. To persuade readers to agree with his perspective, he uses imagery, statistics, and logical reasoning to support a exceptionally composed argument.

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Tyumen Oblast, Russia

The capital city of Tyumen oblast: Tyumen .

Tyumen Oblast - Overview

Tyumen Oblast is a federal subject of Russia stretching from the Arctic Ocean to the boundary with Kazakhstan, part of the Ural Federal District. Tyumen is the capital city of the region.

The population of Tyumen Oblast without autonomous okrugs is about 1,552,000 (2022), the area without autonomous okrugs - 160,122 sq. km.

Tyumen oblast flag

Tyumen oblast coat of arms.

Tyumen oblast coat of arms

Tyumen oblast map, Russia

Tyumen oblast latest news and posts from our blog:.

5 May, 2024 / Tobolsk - One of the Most Beautiful Cities in Siberia .

11 December, 2018 / Tobolsk - the view from above .

5 November, 2018 / Tyumen - the First Russian City in Siberia .

21 June, 2018 / Photos of Tobolsk in 1912 and 2018 .

13 May, 2018 / Nenets Reindeer Herders of Yamal .

More posts..

History of Tyumen Oblast

People began to explore Western Siberia about 15-20 thousand years ago. Western Siberia was inhabited by the tribes of the Khanty and Mansi (Voguls), Nenets (Samoyed), Selkups (Ostyaks-Samoyeds). At the end of the first millennium AD, the Turkic tribes inhabited the south of the present Tyumen region; later, they formed into an ethnic community of the Siberian Tatars.

In the 13th-16th centuries, Chingi-Tura (Chimgi-Tura), the capital of the Tyumen Khanate of the Tatars and Kereits, was standing on the bank of the Tyumenka River. The khanate was in vassal dependence on the Golden Horde. Around 1500, the ruler of the Tyumen Khanate united the greater part of Western Siberia by creating the Siberian Khanate with the capital in the town of Kashlyk, also known as Sibir and Isker.

The Siberian khans waged numerous wars against the Astrakhan Khanate, the Nogai Horde, raided on Russian territory. In 1563, Kuchum became the khan. He managed to unite the previously hostile Tatar tribes, subordinated the Vogul and Samoyed tribes to his influence.

In order to protect their territories from the Tatars, the Urals merchants and industrialists of Stroganov hired the Cossack detachment headed by Ermak to their service. In 1582, the Cossacks began a campaign against the Siberian Khanate. In the autumn of 1582, there was a decisive battle against the troops headed by Kuchum. In the battle at the Chuvash cape, the khan’s forces were defeated.

More Historical Facts…

The Cossacks’ military campaign in Siberia lasted four years. The main forces of the Siberian Tatars were defeated. Even after the death of Ermak in 1585, the khanate could not gain its former strength. The campaign of Ermak opened the way for the Russian migration to Siberia.

In 1586, the construction of a stockaded settlement began on the Tura River. Later, it became the first Russian town in Siberia - Tyumen. In 1587, the stockaded settlement of Tobolsk was founded, 17 km from the Tatar settlement of Sibir (Kashlyk, Isker) (the capital of the Siberian Khanate). In 1593-1594, the towns of Berezov and Surgut were founded. With the expansion of land routes to Eastern Siberia, more Russian towns were founded. In 1590, Tobolsk became the main center of Siberia.

In the 17th century, Tobolsk and Tyumen, as trade and craft centers, reached the level of the towns of the European part of Russia. Since the end of the 17th century, stone construction began - the first stone buildings beyond the Urals appeared in Tobolsk. The only Kremlin in the eastern part of Russia was built in Tobolsk. In 1708, Tobolsk became the administrative center of the largest province in Russia - Siberian province.

One of the factors that determined the life of Western Siberia was the political exile. In the second quarter of the 19th century, the Decembrists were exiled to Tobolsk gubernia (province). Other representatives of liberation movements of Russia - Radishev, Dostoyevsky, Petrashevsky and a lot of others - also experienced imprisonment in Tobolsk.

In the 18th-19th centuries, Tobolsk was the administrative, cultural and spiritual center of Siberia. Tyumen was a commercial and industrial center. Located at the intersection of trade routes between the West and the East, Tyumen turned into a “gateway to Siberia.” Through Tyumen, the path of settlers from the European part of the Russian Empire passed after the abolition of serfdom and during the Stolypin agrarian reform.

The development of the region intensified during the construction of the Trans-Siberian Railway. Several natives of the region became world famous: D.I. Mendeleev (Tobolsk) - one of the greatest chemists and the author of the periodic system, P.P. Ershov (Tobolsk) - a poet, storyteller, author of “The Horse - Hunchback”, G.E. Rasputin (Pokrovskoye village) - the favorite of the last Russian emperor.

In 1917-1918, the family of Nikolai Romanov, the last Russian emperor, was under the arrest in Tobolsk. The town was one of the centers of the largest popular uprising against the Bolsheviks - a peasant uprising in Siberia in 1921-1922. During the Soviet era, the region continued to be a place of exile, part of the Gulag - a system of forced-labor camps.

In the 1920s-1940s, the territory remained mainly agricultural. During the Second World War, a number of industrial enterprises, scientific institutions, ministries, and departments were evacuated to this region. Since the summer of 1941, the body of V.I. Lenin was kept in Tyumen. August 14, 1944, Tyumen oblast with a center in Tyumen was formed, the region also included the Khanty-Mansi and Yamal-Nenets districts.

In 1964, a new page in the history of the Tyumen region began. The discovery of significant oil and natural gas deposits became the basis for the creation of one of the world’s largest oil and gas complexes. The development of oil and gas fields radically changed life in the Tyumen region. Several new towns founded: Novy Urengoy, Nadym, Noyabrsk, and others.

In record time, the Tyumen region became the country’s main oil and gas power base. By the end of the 1980s, the region annually produced about 400 million tons of oil and 574.2 billion cubic meters of natural gas. The development of the natural resources of Tyumen oblast became a matter of the whole country. The population increased tenfold.

Nature of Tyumen Oblast

Scenic landscape in the Tyumen region

Scenic landscape in the Tyumen region

Author: Berdnikov Anton

Tyumen Oblast scenery

Tyumen Oblast scenery

Author: Sergey Bulanov

Wildlife of the Tyumen region

Wildlife of the Tyumen region

Author: N.Milov

Tyumen Oblast - Features

Tyumen Oblast is the only region of Russia that extends (together with autonomous okrugs) from the Arctic Ocean in the north to the state border in the south making it the third largest province of Russia after Yakutia and Krasnoyarsk krai.

The Khanty-Mansi Autonomous Okrug - Yugra is the main oil and gas bearing region of Russia and one of the largest oil producing regions in the world.

The Tyumen region is located in the southwestern part of the West Siberian lowland plain and divides Russia into two large parts: to the west - the Urals and the European part of the country, to the east - the Asian part: Siberia and the Far East.

The climate is arctic and subarctic in the north, temperate - in the center and in the south. The average temperature in January ranges from minus 17 degrees Celsius in Tyumen to minus 27 degrees Celsius in the north.

The largest rivers of the region, the Ob and the Irtysh, are navigable. In total, there are about 70 thousand lakes. Most of the territory is covered with forests.

The bulk of the country’s proven oil and gas reserves are concentrated in the autonomous okrugs of Tyumen Oblast. Peat, quartz sands and limestone are also extracted. Natural ore deposits and precious stones are found on the eastern slope of the Urals, near the Arctic Circle.

Tyumen Oblast - Economy

In terms of industrial output, the Tyumen region ranks first in Russia. The main branch of specialization is the fuel industry, which accounts for more than 80% of the region’s industrial output. The Tobolsk petrochemical plant is the largest in Russia. Timber cutting and wood processing industries are also developed.

The region is characterized by harsh natural and climatic conditions, 90% of the territory is classified as or equivalent to the regions of the Far North. Only 3% of the region’s territory is occupied by agricultural land.

More favorable climatic conditions of the south allow to grow grain, potatoes, vegetables, coarse and juicy forages, the presence of large areas of hayfields and pastures creates favorable conditions for dairy and meat cattle breeding. About 80% of the region’s agricultural output is produced here.

Reindeer herding and fishing are the traditional occupation of the indigenous peoples of the North.

Tourism in Tyumen Oblast

The main types of tourism popular in the Tyumen region: ecological, cultural (excursions), therapeutic and health, hunting and fishing, active recreation.

Tyumen and Tobolsk, the oldest cities founded during the beginning of the development of Siberia, have a number of architectural monuments of the times of the Russian Empire. The city’s day in Tyumen is celebrated on the last Sunday of July. As a rule, several thematic carnivals are held during this time. The city’s day in Tobolsk is celebrated on the last Sunday of June.

In addition to its rich historical and cultural heritage, the Tyumen region has great opportunities for active recreation and for those who wish to receive spa and wellness services. This region is rich in mineral waters, various in medicinal properties and quality, and thermal springs. In the lakes of the region, significant resources of various types of therapeutic mud are concentrated.

The main sights located outside Tyumen and Tobolsk:

Abalak - a village and a popular tourist complex located about 20 km from Tobolsk with a wooden fortress built in the style of the times of the conquest of Siberia. Reconstructions of historical events and holidays are being held here. Another attraction of this place is the Abalak Znamensky Monastery.

Yalutorovsk - an old town with a unique wooden fort, where you can feel the atmosphere of the 17th-18th centuries (watchtowers, craft workshops, recreational zones).

Pokrovskoye - a village in Yarkovsky district, 100 km east of Tyumen, on the road to Tobolsk. It is the birthplace of Grigory Rasputin. There is a museum of Rasputin in the village.

Turnaevo - a center of ecological tourism attracting lovers of wildlife: hiking, horse riding, hunting, fishing, dog sledding (in winter), etc. You can also visit a moose farm.

Andreevskoe Lake - the largest reservoir in the vicinity of Tyumen. It is a system of large and small lakes connected by straits. The area of the water surface is about 30 square kilometers. On the shore of the lake there is an archaeological museum-reserve.

Maryinsky Gorge - a natural monument located in the southern part of the region known for its magnificent landscapes, rich fauna and picturesque bends of the Iset River.

Tyumen oblast of Russia photos

Pictures of tyumen oblast.

Endless field in Tyumen Oblast

Endless field in Tyumen Oblast

Author: Andrey Bogdanov

Paved road in the Tyumen region

Paved road in the Tyumen region

Author: Kulyov Nikita

Abandoned church in Tyumen Oblast

Abandoned church in Tyumen Oblast

Author: Vitaliy Cherepanov

Winter in the Tyumen region

Winter in the Tyumen region

Author: Heinrich Jena

Lake in Tyumen Oblast

Lake in Tyumen Oblast

Author: Dubinsky Roman

Wooden church in Tyumen Oblast

Wooden church in Tyumen Oblast

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COMMENTS

  1. SAT Essay on Todd Davidson "Government Must Preserve National ...

    Todd utilizes statistics, facts, authoritative case, and careful word choices to persuade his audience that the U.S. government must preserve national parks for economic benefits. Davidson starts his essay with impassioned imagery about Crater Lake, Yosemite Valley, and the Great Smoky Mountains, which are eminent national parks in the U.S.

  2. PDF SAT Practice Essay #10

    SAT Practice Essay #10. 10. As you read the passage below, consider how Todd Davidson uses. evidence, such as facts or examples, to support claims. reasoning to develop ideas and to connect claims and evidence. stylistic or persuasive elements, such as word choice or appeals to emotion, to add power to the ideas expressed.

  3. SAT Essay Prompts: The Complete List

    The SAT Essay is no longer offered, but in this article we've compiled every essay prompt that used to be asked for the SAT Essay. CALL NOW: +1 (866) 811-5546 ... "Write an essay in which you explain how Todd Davidson builds an argument to persuade his audience that the US government must continue to fund national parks."

  4. someone pls grade my SAT essay : r/Sat

    someone pls grade my SAT essay. This is from Khan btw and this is the essay : In "Government Must Preserve National Parks", Todd Davidson argues that the protection of national parks is critical for the United States. He persuades the audience using imagery, appeal to emotion, statistics, precise diction, and ethos.

  5. SAT Essay Help

    Voidstriker June 10, 2020, 1:26am 1. Hello I am new to this but I am preparing for the SAT essay by practicing on Khan academy. Prompt and my Essay below. As you read the passage below, consider how Todd Davidson uses: Evidence, such as facts or examples, to support claims. Reasoning to develop ideas and to connect claims and evidence.

  6. Government Must Preserve National Parks by Todd Davidson ...

    Todd Davison tries to create an argument by stating facts and statistics; the evidence seems one-sided almost. Todd Davidson doesn't use multiple people or organizations for evidence. Just uses one source of information (the government). "Each year, nearly 300 million people visit one or more of America's 401 national parks.".

  7. Score SAT Essay : r/Sat

    Score SAT Essay. Throughout the past few years, national parks have received drastically lessened support. In response to this, Todd Davidson passionately argues that the government should expand their aid for these parks in his article "Government Must Preserve National Parks". He effectively builds his argument by utilizing vivid language ...

  8. SAT Essay Prompt

    Essay Prompt: Adapted from Todd Davidson, "Government Must Preserve National Parks." ©2014 by Capitol Hill Publishing Corp. Originally published in the Hill, September 18, 2013. As you read the passage below, consider how Todd Davidson uses evidence, such as facts or examples, to support claims....

  9. PDF Essay

    Write an essay in which you explain how Todd Davidson builds an argument to persuade his audience that the US government must continue to fund national parks. In your essay, analyze how Davidson uses one or more of the features listed in the box above (or features of your own choice) to strengthen the logic and persuasiveness of his argument.

  10. SAT® and AP® English Language essay prompts

    SAT® Essay prompts and texts. Click below to view a list of official SAT® Essay prompts. Then, click the title of each prompt to view the page or download a PDF of the text. ... "Government Must Preserve National Parks" by Todd Davidson AP® English Language and Composition prompts and texts. Click each header to view a list of official ...

  11. SAT Essay tips and corrections

    In summary, Todd Davidson - using word choice, statistic, and appealing to authority - effectively makes the case that America´s national parks are important contributors to the economy and that the money invested in them should not be cut down. ... SAT essay questions belong in this subfirum. isabella28: Yes, I know. But I don´t think it ...

  12. Who Sat in Trump's V.I.P. Box at the Convention?

    The most prominent seats at the 2024 R.N.C. were three rows of white chairs in Donald J. Trump's V.I.P. box. Here's a look at who sat there.

  13. Six Takeaways From the Republican Convention

    Donald J. Trump ended a buoyant gathering in Milwaukee with a speech that started solemn, turned rambling and showcased his all-encompassing power over his party. Speaker Mike Johnson, Republican ...

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    The party's embrace of Donald J. Trump comes as President Biden's campaign is in turmoil. Mr. Trump heads out to campaign with his new running mate, J.D. Vance, with a rally set for Michigan ...

  15. Feedback on my "Government Must Preserve National Parks" essay? : r/Sat

    Posted by u/SilverSword2 - 1 vote and 4 comments

  16. Attack thwarted on energy facility in Russia's Tyumen, investigators

    Russian investigators on Thursday said the FSB security service had shot dead a 38-year-old Russian man as he made preparations to blow up an energy facility in the oil-rich Tyumen region.

  17. Grade my essay pls

    Try to create a more clear and concise presentation. First: Rethink using the word "relaxing" in the first sentence of your essay. Consider using "reducing" instead of "relaxing". Second: Your introductory paragraph fails to share why Schiffman thinks that Americans should work fewer hours.

  18. Essay Grading : r/Sat

    Essay Grading. Someone please grade my essay. This is from Khan Academy. Write an essay in which you explain how Todd Davidson builds an argument to persuade his audience that the US government must continue to fund national parks. In your essay, analyze how Davidson uses one or more of the features listed above (or features of your own choice ...

  19. The bourgeois charm of Siberia's oil capital

    For centuries, Tyumen vied with the nearby city of Tobolsk—once the official capital of Siberia—for the prestige of the region's most important city. Tyumen won in the end, when the Trans ...

  20. Tyumen

    Tyumen. Tyumen, the first Russian settlement in Siberia, lies 2,500km (1,600 mi) east of Moscow and behind the Ural Mountains. The Tyumen Oblast (region) has seen significant economic growth over the past twenty years, fuelled by the discovery and exploitation of significant oil fields. Tyumen is also an educational centre, with more than forty ...

  21. Can someone read my SAT Essay please? If you're able to, could ...

    In response to federal government budget cuts amid the economic prosperity that national parks bring to the United States, Todd Davidson writes a…

  22. Tyumen Oblast, Russia guide

    Tyumen Oblast - Overview. Tyumen Oblast is a federal subject of Russia stretching from the Arctic Ocean to the boundary with Kazakhstan, part of the Ural Federal District. Tyumen is the capital city of the region. The population of Tyumen Oblast without autonomous okrugs is about 1,552,000 (2022), the area without autonomous okrugs - 160,122 sq. km.