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Plural of Thesis

The Quick Answer

The Plural of Thesis

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Table of Contents

Are You Good at Plurals?

The standard rules for forming the plurals, why is there confusion over the plural of thesis.

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plural of thesis

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Definition of thesis

Did you know.

In high school, college, or graduate school, students often have to write a thesis on a topic in their major field of study. In many fields, a final thesis is the biggest challenge involved in getting a master's degree, and the same is true for students studying for a Ph.D. (a Ph.D. thesis is often called a dissertation ). But a thesis may also be an idea; so in the course of the paper the student may put forth several theses (notice the plural form) and attempt to prove them.

Examples of thesis in a Sentence

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'thesis.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

in sense 3, Middle English, lowering of the voice, from Late Latin & Greek; Late Latin, from Greek, downbeat, more important part of a foot, literally, act of laying down; in other senses, Latin, from Greek, literally, act of laying down, from tithenai to put, lay down — more at do

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 3a(1)

Dictionary Entries Near thesis

the sins of the fathers are visited upon the children

thesis novel

Cite this Entry

“Thesis.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary , Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/thesis. Accessed 17 May. 2024.

Kids Definition

Kids definition of thesis, more from merriam-webster on thesis.

Nglish: Translation of thesis for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of thesis for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about thesis

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  • 1.1 Etymology
  • 1.2 Pronunciation
  • 1.3.1 Derived terms
  • 1.3.2 Related terms
  • 1.3.3 Translations
  • 1.4 References
  • 1.5 Further reading
  • 1.6 Anagrams
  • 2.1 Etymology
  • 2.2 Pronunciation
  • 3.1 Etymology
  • 3.2 Pronunciation
  • 3.3.1 Declension
  • 3.3.2 Descendants
  • 3.4 References

English [ edit ]

Etymology [ edit ].

From Late Middle English thesis ( “ lowering of the voice ” ) [1] and also borrowed directly from its etymon Latin thesis ( “ proposition, thesis; lowering of the voice ” ) , from Ancient Greek θέσῐς ( thésis , “ arrangement, placement, setting; conclusion, position, thesis; lowering of the voice ” ) , from τῐ́θημῐ ( títhēmi , “ to place, put, set; to put down in writing; to consider as, regard ” ) [2] [3] (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeh₁- ( “ to do; to place, put ” ) ) + -σῐς ( -sis , suffix forming abstract nouns or nouns of action, process, or result ) . The English word is a doublet of deed .

Sense 1.1 (“proposition or statement supported by arguments”) is adopted from antithesis . [2] Sense 1.4 (“initial stage of reasoning”) was first used by the German philosopher Johann Gottlieb Fichte (1762–1814), and later applied to the dialectical method of his countryman, the philosopher Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770–1831).

The plural form theses is borrowed from Latin thesēs , from Ancient Greek θέσεις ( théseis ) .

Pronunciation [ edit ]

  • ( Received Pronunciation ) IPA ( key ) : /ˈθiːsɪs/ , ( archaic ) /ˈθɛsɪs/
  • ( General American ) IPA ( key ) : /ˈθisɪs/
  • Rhymes: -iːsɪs
  • Hyphenation: the‧sis
  • ( Received Pronunciation ) IPA ( key ) : /ˈθiːsiːz/
  • ( General American ) IPA ( key ) : /ˈθisiz/
  • Rhymes: -iːsiːz
  • Hyphenation: the‧ses

Noun [ edit ]

thesis ( plural theses )

  • ( rhetoric ) A proposition or statement supported by arguments .
  • 1766 , [ Oliver Goldsmith ], “The Conclusion”, in The Vicar of Wakefield:   [ … ] , volume II, Salisbury, Wiltshire: [ … ] B. Collins, for F [ rancis ] Newbery ,   [ … ] , →OCLC ; reprinted London: Elliot Stock , 1885 , →OCLC , pages 218–219 : I told them of the grave, becoming, and ſublime deportment they ſhould aſſume upon this myſtical occaſion, and read them two homilies and a theſis of my own compoſing, in order to prepare them.
  • ( mathematics , computer science ) A conjecture , especially one too vague to be formally stated or verified but useful as a working convention.
  • ( logic ) An affirmation , or distinction from a supposition or hypothesis .
  • ( philosophy ) In the dialectical method of Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel : the initial stage of reasoning where a formal statement of a point is developed ; this is followed by antithesis and synthesis .
  • ( music , prosody , originally ) The action of lowering the hand or bringing down the foot when indicating a rhythm ; hence, an accented part of a measure of music or verse indicated by this action; an ictus , a stress . Antonym: arsis
  • ( music , prosody , with a reversal of meaning ) A depression of the voice when pronouncing a syllables of a word ; hence, the unstressed part of the metrical foot of a verse upon which such a depression falls , or an unaccented musical note .

Derived terms [ edit ]

  • all but thesis
  • bachelor's thesis
  • Church-Turing thesis
  • conflict thesis
  • doctoral thesis
  • graduate thesis
  • Habakkuk thesis
  • master's thesis
  • Merton thesis
  • private language thesis
  • thesis defense
  • thesis film
  • thesis statement

Related terms [ edit ]

Translations [ edit ], references [ edit ].

  • ^ “ thē̆sis, n. ”, in MED Online , Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan , 2007 .
  • ^ “ thesis, n. ”, in Lexico , Dictionary.com ; Oxford University Press , 2019–2022 .

Further reading [ edit ]

  • “ thesis ”, in The Century Dictionary   [ … ] , New York, N.Y.: The Century Co. , 1911 , →OCLC .
  • “ thesis ”, in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary , Springfield, Mass.: G. & C. Merriam , 1913 , →OCLC .

Anagrams [ edit ]

  • Heists , Sethis , heists , shiest , shites , sithes , thises

Dutch [ edit ]

From Latin thesis , from Ancient Greek θέσις ( thésis , “ a proposition, a statement, a thing laid down, thesis in rhetoric, thesis in prosody ” ) .

thesis   f ( plural theses or thesissen , diminutive thesisje   n )

  • Dated form of these . Synonyms: dissertatie , proefschrift , scriptie

Latin [ edit ]

From Ancient Greek θέσις ( thésis , “ a proposition, a statement, a thing laid down, thesis in rhetoric, thesis in prosody ” ) .

  • ( Classical ) IPA ( key ) : /ˈtʰe.sis/ , [ˈt̪ʰɛs̠ɪs̠]
  • ( modern Italianate Ecclesiastical ) IPA ( key ) : /ˈte.sis/ , [ˈt̪ɛːs̬is]

thesis   f ( genitive thesis ) ; third declension

Declension [ edit ]

Descendants [ edit ].

  • → Dutch: thesis
  • → Armenian: թեզ ( tʻez )
  • → Dutch: these
  • → Persian: تز ( tez )
  • → Romanian: teză
  • → Turkish: tez
  • Galician: tese
  • Italian: tesi
  • English: thesis
  • Portuguese: tese
  • Spanish: tesis
  • “ thesis ”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short ( 1879 ) A Latin Dictionary , Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • thesis in Gaffiot, Félix ( 1934 ) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français , Hachette.

thesis is plural

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What’s the Plural of Thesis? (Thesises? Theses?)

  • November 13, 2022

thesis is plural

What’s the plural of “thesis”?

Thesis , (and its plural theses ) is an example of one of the many common English words that has roots elsewhere. In this case, thesis is a word that has roots all the way back to Ancient Greek. Like other similarly structured words: diagnosis , synthesis , analysis , oasis , crisis , nemesis and the like, thesis is by no means the only frequently used Greek word that’s made it to Modern English.

What’s the singular of thesis?

"Thesis" singular in sentences.

Thesis is a singular noun and refers to one thing (or one thesis ).

What’s a thesis?

Merriam-Webster defines the noun thesis (plural theses ) as follows, “a dissertation embodying results of original research and especially substantiating a specific view especially : one written by a candidate for an academic degree.”

thesis is plural

Nouns that end in -sis/ses

Thesis is an irregular plural noun that does not end in the typical -s / -es that regular plural noun forms take. This is so despite that theses plural does in fact end in the conventional -s/-es suffix. Why is it still considered irregular; then, given that it follows the regular plural form? Notice the following regular plural noun forms:

thesis is plural

Thesis / theses operates differently. With these Greek words, the -ses does not simply  add onto the end of the singular form of the noun; instead, -ses replaces the singular noun’s suffixes, and effectively changes the entire spelling of the word (and arguably the word itself.)

Examples of “thesis” (singular) in sentences

His master thesis was on modal neural networks.
She wrote her thesis on Renaissance Nativity scenes.
We disagreed with the basic thesis of the report.
I’ve made a first draft of my thesis .
The student’s experiments helped her formulate a thesis to share with her professor and classmates.

Examples of “theses” (plural) in sentences

It must not be assumed that Luther’s ninety-five theses produced any considerable direct results.
The collection of theses are ready for publication.
Twenty years after Savonarola’s death Martin Luther made public his theses against indulgences.
Theses are generally examined by two or more specialists.
Theses is the plural form of the singular noun thesis.

Origin of the word “thesis”

Thesis / theses are of Greek origin.

Read about other irregular nouns

  • What’s the plural of bison?
  • What’s the plural of moose?
  • What’s the plural of sheep?
  • What’s the plural of ox?
  • What’s the plural of cactus?
  • What’s the plural of crisis?
  • What’s the plural of hypothesis?

Read about other topics in grammar

  • What’re personal pronouns?
  • What’s the difference between they’re, their, and there?
  • Whose vs who’s?
  • Merriam-Webster, thesis/theses.

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Definition of thesis noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

  • Students must submit a thesis on an agreed subject within four years.
  • He presented this thesis for his PhD.
  • a thesis for a master's degree
  • He's doing a doctoral thesis on the early works of Shostakovich.
  • Many departments require their students to do a thesis defense.
  • She completed an MSc by thesis.
  • her thesis adviser at MIT
  • in a/​the thesis
  • thesis about

Questions about grammar and vocabulary?

Find the answers with Practical English Usage online, your indispensable guide to problems in English.

  • The basic thesis of the book is fairly simple.
  • These latest findings support the thesis that sexuality is determined by nature rather than choice.
  • formulate/​advance a theory/​hypothesis
  • build/​construct/​create/​develop a simple/​theoretical/​mathematical model
  • develop/​establish/​provide/​use a theoretical/​conceptual framework
  • advance/​argue/​develop the thesis that…
  • explore an idea/​a concept/​a hypothesis
  • make a prediction/​an inference
  • base a prediction/​your calculations on something
  • investigate/​evaluate/​accept/​challenge/​reject a theory/​hypothesis/​model
  • design an experiment/​a questionnaire/​a study/​a test
  • do research/​an experiment/​an analysis
  • make observations/​measurements/​calculations
  • carry out/​conduct/​perform an experiment/​a test/​a longitudinal study/​observations/​clinical trials
  • run an experiment/​a simulation/​clinical trials
  • repeat an experiment/​a test/​an analysis
  • replicate a study/​the results/​the findings
  • observe/​study/​examine/​investigate/​assess a pattern/​a process/​a behaviour
  • fund/​support the research/​project/​study
  • seek/​provide/​get/​secure funding for research
  • collect/​gather/​extract data/​information
  • yield data/​evidence/​similar findings/​the same results
  • analyse/​examine the data/​soil samples/​a specimen
  • consider/​compare/​interpret the results/​findings
  • fit the data/​model
  • confirm/​support/​verify a prediction/​a hypothesis/​the results/​the findings
  • prove a conjecture/​hypothesis/​theorem
  • draw/​make/​reach the same conclusions
  • read/​review the records/​literature
  • describe/​report an experiment/​a study
  • present/​publish/​summarize the results/​findings
  • present/​publish/​read/​review/​cite a paper in a scientific journal
  • The results of the experiment support his central thesis.
  • Most people rejected this thesis at the time because it presumed evolution rather than creation.
  • fundamental

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[ thee -sis ]

He vigorously defended his thesis on the causes of war.

Synonyms: proposal , contention , theory

  • a subject for a composition or essay.
  • a dissertation on a particular subject in which one has done original research, as one presented by a candidate for a diploma or degree.
  • Music. the downward stroke in conducting; downbeat. Compare arsis ( def 1 ) .
  • a part of a metrical foot that does not bear the ictus or stress.
  • (less commonly) the part of a metrical foot that bears the ictus. Compare arsis ( def 2 ) .
  • Philosophy. Hegelian dialectic

/ ˈθiːsɪs /

  • a dissertation resulting from original research, esp when submitted by a candidate for a degree or diploma
  • a doctrine maintained or promoted in argument
  • a subject for a discussion or essay
  • an unproved statement, esp one put forward as a premise in an argument
  • music the downbeat of a bar, as indicated in conducting
  • (in classical prosody) the syllable or part of a metrical foot not receiving the ictus Compare arsis
  • philosophy the first stage in the Hegelian dialectic, that is challenged by the antithesis
  • The central idea in a piece of writing, sometimes contained in a topic sentence .

Discover More

Word history and origins.

Origin of thesis 1

Example Sentences

In “Back Home,” Gil also revisits the nostalgia for the South explored in his Johns Hopkins thesis, “Circle of Stone.”

At least father and son were in alignment on this central thesis: acting “gay”—bad; being thought of as gay—bad.

Her doctoral thesis, says Ramin Takloo at the University of Illinois, was simply outstanding.

Marshall McLuhan long ago argued the now accepted thesis that different mediums have different influences on thinking.

He wrote his Master's thesis on the underrepresentation of young people in Congress.

And indeed for most young men a college thesis is but an exercise for sharpening the wits, rarely dangerous in its later effects.

It will be for the reader to determine whether the main thesis of the book has gained or lost by the new evidence.

But the word thesis, when applied to Systems, does not mean the 'position' of single notes, but of groups of notes.

This conclusion, it need hardly be said, is in entire agreement with the main thesis of the preceding pages.

Sundry outlying Indians, with ammunition to waste, took belly and knee rests and strengthened the thesis to the contrary.

Related Words

  • proposition
  • supposition

ESLBUZZ

Plural of Thesis: A Quick Guide for English Learners

By: Author ESLBUZZ

Posted on Last updated: October 11, 2023

Sharing is caring!

Do you know the plural of thesis? Understanding the correct plural of thesis is important not only for academic writing, but for general communication as well. Whether you’re discussing multiple research papers or simply trying to sound knowledgeable in a conversation, using the correct plural form can help you make a good impression and avoid any confusion or misunderstandings.

Plural of Thesis

Plural of Thesis: A Quick Guide for English Learners

Definition and Plural of Thesis

When writing a research paper or dissertation, the central argument or main point is known as a thesis. A thesis is a statement or proposition that is put forward as a premise to be maintained or proved. It is a crucial element of academic writing and is often required for a degree or certification.

The plural of thesis is “theses.” In English, most nouns form the plural by adding an “s” at the end. However, “thesis” is one of the few exceptions to this rule. The word “thesis” has a Greek root, and “theses” is how it is pluralized in that original language.

It is important to note that “theses” is the only way to make the noun “thesis” plural. There is no alternative form of the plural for this word.

In academic writing, the plural form “theses” is commonly used when referring to multiple research papers or dissertations. For example, “I have read several theses on this topic, and they all have different viewpoints.”

When to Use Thesis and Its Plural Form

When writing academic papers or conducting research, it is important to understand when to use the word “thesis” and its plural form, “theses.” Here are some guidelines to help you use these words correctly:

  • Use “thesis” when referring to a single research paper or dissertation that presents a specific argument or viewpoint.
  • Use “theses” when referring to multiple research papers or dissertations.
  • Remember that “thesis” is a singular noun and “theses” is its plural form.
  • Be aware that “thesis” has a Greek root and follows the same pluralization rule as other Greek words ending in “-is,” such as “crisis” and “analysis.” They become “crises” and “analyses,” respectively.
  • Keep in mind that “thesis” can also refer to a statement or proposition that is put forward for consideration or discussion. In this case, the plural form would be “theses.”
  • When citing multiple theses in a paper, use “theses” to indicate the plurality. For example, “The theses presented in this paper all support the idea that…”

Examples of Thesis and Its Plural Form in Sentences

If you are wondering how to use the word “thesis” in a sentence, here are a few examples:

  • Your thesis statement should be clear and concise.
  • The professor asked us to submit our theses by the end of the semester.
  • The thesis of the article is that climate change is caused by human activity.
  • She spent months researching and writing her thesis on the history of feminism .
  • The committee was impressed by the depth and originality of his thesis.

As you can see, “thesis” is used to refer to a statement or argument put forth by a writer or speaker, as well as a research paper written by a student to earn a degree.

Now, let’s take a look at the plural form of “thesis.” According to Grammar Monster, the only correct way to form the plural of “thesis” is “theses.” Here are some examples of how to use “theses” in a sentence:

  • The library has a collection of theses written by graduate students.
  • The professor asked us to read several theses on the topic before starting our own research.
  • The theses presented at the conference covered a wide range of topics.
  • The committee was impressed by the quality and originality of the theses submitted.

Plural Noun Rules for Regular Nouns

When forming the plural of regular nouns, there are some standard rules to follow. These rules apply to most English nouns, including “thesis.” Here are the basic guidelines:

  • For most singular nouns, simply add an “-s” to the end to form the plural. For example, “book” becomes “books,” “car” becomes “cars,” and “house” becomes “houses.”
  • If the singular noun ends in “-s,” “-x,” “-z,” “-ch,” or “-sh,” add “-es” to form the plural. For example, “bus” becomes “buses,” “box” becomes “boxes,” “buzz” becomes “buzzes,” “church” becomes “churches,” and “dish” becomes “dishes.”
  • If the singular noun ends in a consonant followed by “-y,” change the “-y” to “-ies” to form the plural. For example, “city” becomes “cities,” “baby” becomes “babies,” and “story” becomes “stories.”
  • If the singular noun ends in a vowel followed by “-y,” simply add an “-s” to form the plural. For example, “boy” becomes “boys,” “key” becomes “keys,” and “day” becomes “days.”

It’s important to note that there are some irregular nouns that don’t follow these rules. For example, “child” becomes “children,” “foot” becomes “feet,” and “tooth” becomes “teeth.” However, “thesis” is a regular noun, so it follows the standard rules for forming the plural.

Plural Noun Rules for Irregular Nouns

When it comes to forming the plural of nouns in English, there are some general rules that apply to most words. However, there are also many irregular nouns that don’t follow these rules and have unique plural forms. In this section, we’ll go over some common irregular plural nouns and the rules for forming their plurals.

List of Common Irregular Plural Nouns

Here are some examples of irregular plural nouns that you may come across:

Nouns that End in Us

Nouns that end in “us” often have a plural form that ends in “i”. For example:

Nouns that End in Is

Nouns that end in “is” may have a plural form that ends in “es”. For example:

Nouns that End in On

Nouns that end in “on” may have a plural form that ends in “a”. For example:

Plurals That Are the Same as Singulars

Some nouns have the same form for both the singular and plural. For example:

Words That Look Like Plural Nouns but Are Singular Nouns

Some words may look like plural nouns but are actually singular nouns. For example:

Collective Nouns and List

When it comes to forming the plural of nouns, collective nouns can be a bit tricky. A collective noun refers to a group of people or things as a single entity. For example, “team” is a collective noun because it refers to a group of individuals working together towards a common goal.

The challenge with collective nouns is deciding whether to treat them as singular or plural. In American English, collective nouns are usually treated as singular, while in British English, they can be treated as either singular or plural depending on the context.

Here are some examples of collective nouns and how they can be treated in different contexts:

As you can see, the choice of whether to use a singular or plural verb depends on whether you are referring to the group as a single entity or as individuals within the group.

When it comes to forming the plural of collective nouns, the same rules apply as for regular nouns. For example, the plural of “team” is “teams”, and the plural of “family” is “families”.

Plural Nouns vs. Possessive Nouns

When it comes to forming the plural of nouns, there are standard rules that apply to most words in the English language. However, there are some exceptions, such as the word “thesis.” The plural of “thesis” is “theses,” and this is the only correct way to form the plural of this word.

On the other hand, when it comes to forming possessive nouns, there are a few rules to keep in mind. Here are some key points to remember:

  • For singular nouns, add an apostrophe and an “s” to show possession. For example, “the thesis’s conclusion” means the conclusion belonging to the thesis.
  • For plural nouns that end in “s,” add only an apostrophe to show possession. For example, “the theses’ conclusions” means the conclusions belonging to the theses.
  • For plural nouns that do not end in “s,” add an apostrophe and an “s” to show possession. For example, “women’s rights” means the rights belonging to women.

It’s important to note that possessive nouns should not be confused with plural nouns. While they may look similar, they serve different grammatical functions. Possessive nouns show ownership or possession, while plural nouns simply refer to more than one of something.

Common Mistakes with Plural Nouns

When it comes to forming the plural of nouns, there are some common mistakes that are made. Here are a few things to keep in mind when forming the plural of the word “thesis” and other nouns:

Adding an Apostrophe

One common mistake is adding an apostrophe to a noun to make it plural. For example, “the thesis’s” instead of “the theses.” This is incorrect and should be avoided.

Irregular Plurals

Some nouns have irregular plurals that do not follow the standard rules. For example, “child” becomes “children” and “goose” becomes “geese.” It is important to learn these irregular plurals to avoid mistakes.

Confusion over Plurals

Some nouns, like “thesis,” can cause confusion over their plural form. “Theses” is the only correct way to make “thesis” plural. Other words that end in “-is” may also have irregular plurals, such as “crisis” becoming “crises.”

Using Incorrect Count Nouns

It is important to use the correct count nouns when referring to multiple instances of something. For example, “studies” instead of “researches,” and “pieces of evidence” instead of “evidences.” Using the incorrect count noun can make your writing sound awkward or confusing.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the correct plural form of ‘thesis’?

The correct plural form of ‘thesis’ is ‘theses.’ It is an irregular plural noun that does not follow the typical -s/-es suffix used for regular plural nouns.

How is ‘thesis’ used in a sentence?

‘Thesis’ refers to a statement or theory that is put forward as a premise to be maintained or proved. An example sentence would be: “Her thesis on the effects of climate change was well-researched and presented.”

What is the origin of the word ‘thesis’?

The word ‘thesis’ comes from the Greek word ‘tithenai,’ which means ‘to place’ or ‘to put.’ In academia, it refers to a statement or theory that is put forward as a premise to be maintained or proved.

What is the difference between ‘thesis’ and ‘theses’?

‘Thesis’ is the singular form of the word, while ‘theses’ is the plural form. ‘Thesis’ refers to a single statement or theory, while ‘theses’ refers to multiple statements or theories.

The plural of thesis is the word 'theses'.

"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"How do you pluralize thesis?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

To pluralize 'thesis', you simply add 'es' to the end of the word. This is because 'thesis' ends in 'is', which is a singular noun ending.

"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"Is the plural of thesis 'theses'?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

Yes, the plural of thesis is 'theses'.

"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"What is the irregular plural form of thesis?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

'Theses' is not an irregular plural form of thesis. It is a regular plural form.

"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"What are some examples of irregular plural nouns?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

Some examples of irregular plural nouns include 'child' (children), 'tooth' (teeth), and 'foot' (feet).

"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"How do you correctly pluralize nouns ending in -is?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

To correctly pluralize nouns ending in -is, you simply change the 'is' to 'es'. For example, the plural of 'thesis' is 'theses', and the plural of 'analysis' is 'analyses'.

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English Teacher Site

Whats the Plural of Thesis: Understanding Singular and Plural Forms

  • The plural of “thesis” adheres to the Greek-rooted pattern, changing the singular -is to a plural -es.
  • Accurate use of “thesis” and “theses” reflects scholarly precision in both written and oral communication.
  • Awareness of correct pluralization extends to other similar nouns ending in -sis, emphasizing the importance of understanding language origins.

It is crucial to use the word correctly in both singular and plural contexts to maintain the integrity of written and spoken communication. In the realm of academics, precision in language reflects the rigor of one’s research and argumentation. As such, understanding the transformation from “thesis” to its plural counterpart is more than a trivial detail; it reflects a deeper appreciation for the structure and history of the English language.

What’s the Plural of Thesis?

The proper plural of thesis is “theses.” This transformation is part of a broader pattern in the English language where certain nouns change their ending to reflect a plural state.

Below, a comparison is made to illustrate the standard singular to plural transformation for nouns ending in -is:

Key Points about the pluralization of “thesis”:

  • The plural follows a specific rule of changing the ‘-is’ ending to ‘-es’.
  • This pattern is consistent with other Greek-derived words.
  • The pronunciation changes with the plural form, ending in “-eez.”

To clarify usage, consider these examples:

  • Singular: The student’s thesis was commended for its clarity.
  • Plural: The professor read all the submitted theses before the conference.

Singular Form of Thesis

The singular form of ‘thesis’ is of notable interest due to its origins and distinct pluralization.

Origination and Definition:

  • Etymology : Derived from the ancient Greek word τίθημι (tithēmi), which means “to put” or “to place.”
  • Meaning : It is a statement or theory put forward to be maintained or proved.

Usage in Academia:

  • A significant piece of writing prepared by a student to obtain a university degree or diploma.
  • Often involves original research and substantiates a particular view or argument.

Table 1: Notable Features of ‘Thesis’

Table 2: Contextual Examples

Definition of Thesis

A thesis is a substantial piece of scholarly writing that is typically required to obtain a master’s or doctoral degree. It represents the author’s research and findings in their chosen field of study. A thesis serves as evidence that the student has acquired the knowledge necessary to be considered a scholar in the field. Here, two key aspects of a thesis will be described through tables:

Purpose and Composition of a Thesis:

Characteristics of a Thesis:

  • Focused : It should have a clear, concise premise or central argument.
  • Researched : Employs rigorous methodologies to gather and analyze data.
  • Structured : Contains defined sections that present information logically.
  • Cited : Includes proper citations of sources that support or contrast the thesis.
  • Reviewed : Undergoes scrutiny by academic peers or supervisors.

Other Irregular Plural Nouns Ending in -sis/ses

Below you will find two tables categorized by common and less common irregular plurals that follow this pattern.

Common Irregular Plurals:

This pattern is often observed with words that have Greek origins.

Less Common Irregular Plurals:

It is important to recognize these forms to maintain grammatical accuracy in writing and speech. Below is a list of examples used in sentences:

  • When multiple scientific hypotheses are tested, the results can lead to important discoveries.
  • During the editing process, Jane had to review all the parentheses to ensure clarity in her writing.
  • Geographers study multiple oases in the desert to understand these unique ecosystems.
  • His thesis on renewable energy was well-received, and many theses on the subject reference his work.

Examples of Thesis (Singular) in Sentences

Here are examples that demonstrate its usage in various sentences.

In Academic Context

In everyday discourse.

Informal setting : During the debate, his thesis was that space exploration is no longer just a dream but a necessity.

  • Discussing beliefs : Her thesis is that all public spaces should offer free Wi-Fi.
  • Opinion : They argued the thesis that high taxes discourage spending.

Examples of Theses (Plural) in Sentences

Here are some examples of how “theses” can be used in sentences:

Education Setting : Graduate students often struggle to find unique topics for their theses as most ideas have been extensively explored.

  • Evaluating the structure and arguments of different theses can help one build a stronger dissertation.

Origin of the Word Thesis

The term thesis originates from the ancient Greek word θέσις (thésis), which means “a proposition” . Historically, this term has played a crucial role in both rhetorical and academic contexts. It denotes a statement that a writer intends to support and prove. In academic circles, thesis often refers to a document that presents the author’s research and findings and is submitted in support of candidature for a degree or professional qualification.

Etymological Background

The journey of the word from its Greek roots to the modern English language reflects the changing dynamics of educational and scholarly practices over the centuries.

As a carryover from Greek to Latin, the word made its way into English, maintaining its original Greek plural form:

Usage in Academia

In academia, the word has been used since the late Middle Ages to denote a scholarly work written by students aiming to obtain a university degree. Over time, the use of thesis expanded from merely referring to a proposition to a lengthy document providing evidence of comprehensive research.

Historical Evolution:

  • Middle Ages : Referred to propositions for a degree.
  • Renaissance : Emphasized individual research.
  • Modern Usage : Extensive research documents for higher education degrees.

Areas of Impact:

  • Rhetoric : Considered as a premise to be argued.
  • Academic Research : Reflects comprehensive study in a field.

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Definition of 'thesis'

IPA Pronunciation Guide

thesis in British English

Thesis in american english, examples of 'thesis' in a sentence thesis, cobuild collocations thesis, trends of thesis.

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In other languages thesis

  • American English : thesis / ˈθisɪs /
  • Brazilian Portuguese : tese
  • Chinese : 论点
  • European Spanish : tesis
  • French : thèse
  • German : These
  • Italian : tesi
  • Japanese : 主張
  • Korean : 논지
  • European Portuguese : tese
  • Latin American Spanish : tesis
  • Thai : ข้อสมมุติ, ข้อวินิจฉัย

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What does the noun thesis mean?

There are eight meanings listed in OED's entry for the noun thesis . See ‘Meaning & use’ for definitions, usage, and quotation evidence.

thesis has developed meanings and uses in subjects including

Entry status

OED is undergoing a continuous programme of revision to modernize and improve definitions. This entry has not yet been fully revised.

How common is the noun thesis ?

How is the noun thesis pronounced, british english, u.s. english, where does the noun thesis come from.

Earliest known use

Middle English

The earliest known use of the noun thesis is in the Middle English period (1150—1500).

OED's earliest evidence for thesis is from before 1398, in a translation by John Trevisa, translator.

thesis is a borrowing from Greek.

Etymons: Greek θέσις .

Nearby entries

  • thesaurus, n. 1823–
  • thesaury, n. a1639–1708
  • these, n. a1600–48
  • these, pron. & adj. Old English–
  • Thesean, adj. 1815–
  • Theseid, n. 1725–
  • Theseium, n. 1819–
  • these-like, adj. 1644–
  • thesial, adj. 1654
  • thesicle, n. 1863–
  • thesis, n. a1398–
  • thesis-novel, n. 1934–
  • thesis-play, n. 1902–
  • thesmophilist, n. 1644–
  • Thesmophorian, adj. 1891–
  • Thesmophoric, adj. 1788–
  • thesmothete, n. 1603–
  • thesocyte, n. 1887–
  • thesp, n. 1962–
  • Thespian, adj. & n. 1675–
  • Thespianism, n. 1914–

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Meaning & use

Pronunciation, compounds & derived words, entry history for thesis, n..

thesis, n. was first published in 1912; not yet revised.

thesis, n. was last modified in March 2024.

Revision of the OED is a long-term project. Entries in oed.com which have not been revised may include:

  • corrections and revisions to definitions, pronunciation, etymology, headwords, variant spellings, quotations, and dates;
  • new senses, phrases, and quotations which have been added in subsequent print and online updates.

Revisions and additions of this kind were last incorporated into thesis, n. in March 2024.

Earlier versions of this entry were published in:

OED First Edition (1912)

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Citation details

Factsheet for thesis, n., browse entry.

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Meaning of theses in English

Examples of theses.

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Rain is Coming

Never-before seen photo of Palestinian fighters in Jerusalem, circa 1948, by Yousef H. Giries. Courtesy of Clarissa Bitar.

Every year since I started writing, whether in Arabic or English, I have produced various iterations of the same essay or poem on Nakba Day, riddled with the same facts and figures and tired arguments, in hopes that one day such persuasion and schooling would no longer be necessary. The thesis has been consistent: pairing “anniversary” and “Nakba” in the same sentence is a misalliance; the time frame, 76 years, is a miscalculation. The English translation—“Catastrophe”—is reductive, because it wasn’t a sudden natural disaster. Nor is it a tragic relic from the past. The Nakba is an organized and ongoing process of colonization and genocide that neither began nor ended in 1948. The perpetrators have names and the crime scene remains active. And where you cannot see the rubble, know that pine trees have been planted on top of it, to conceal it. 

I read that, in Gaza, they have opened a new kindergarten in the North, a phoenix of sorts, and I want to believe that there is already a clean scent of jasmine that follows the teachers as they go about their day — what, if not jasmine, can ease the nagging of children and the nagging of warplanes? I have been holding on to this piece of good news for the past couple of weeks, filling in the blanks with my own speculations. There is jasmine because seeds do not need permission, or a ceasefire, to germinate. Children nag because that is what children do. What do five-year-olds learn, besides the numbers and alphabet, in the time of genocide? What jokes do they tell to pass the time? Their vocabulary expands, naturally, to include words more brutal than “invasion,” “siege,” and “Nakba,” and their teachers, I imagine, tell them that the Nakba, the original Nakba (1947-49), pales in comparison to Gaza’s present. Even the rich — all of the rich — are in tents this time around. 

It is hard to predict how we will historicize this current moment, but if our reflections on the late forties are any indication, we might remember only today’s destruction and defeat. And for good reason — at this very moment, with no hyperbole, our people’s corpses have been piled up in mass graves, plural, their wrists, big and tiny alike, bound with zip-ties. Horrors that we once learned as oral histories and cautionary tales are livestreamed today, incessantly, forever etched in our memories.  The past seven months have shown us that even metaphor is a casualty of war. What was once figurative is painfully literal: bloodied beards, furniture in trees, a limb hanging from a ceiling fan, women giving birth on the concrete. Clichés cover the terrain: plants erupting through rubble, flowers springing from cement, etcetera. The surreal happens so much. Journalists are poets, almost, when reporting about the decomposed under ruins. Doctors have invented acronyms for conditions my fiction professors would have called unrealistically episodic. Death is everywhere. 

And so when one begins to write or speak about Palestine, it is tempting to look at loss and only loss, and to find in this loss a plea for survival. We have suffered a lot , we say to those who will listen, we have suffered enough. Too often our suffering is reported without a culprit, our anguished cries exist outside of history and politics. We have no national aspirations, no land to cultivate. Our existence is purely mechanistic — we are reminded, through policy and procedure, that we are unfortunately born to die. And in our deterministic march to the grave, we encounter each other as unlucky strangers, frail and futureless. 

But there is — and always has been — more to our reality. We are, without a doubt, subjects of conquest and colonization, products of circumstance, but we are also so much more than that. At every turn of our bloodied history, we have been brutalized, bereaved, dispossessed, exiled, starved, slaughtered and imprisoned, but we have, to the world’s dismay, refused to submit. For every massacre and invasion, there have been and there are now men and women who pick up their weapons, makeshift and sophisticated — Molotovs, rifles, slingshots, rockets —  to fight. There has always been struggle, there has always been jasmine. 

In parallel, there is also more to our enemy. Zionism, behind the facade of the impenetrable superpower it purports to be, is more vulnerable today than ever. And I do not say this naïvely: I do not ask that we gloss over our enemy’s capabilities or the power of the empires and mercenaries that back it. Nor do I ask that we trivialize the crushing weight of forty thousand martyrs, or glamorize the men confronting tanks in tracksuits and burden them with more than they can handle. Freedom fighters understand that their opponent is Goliath, that the odds are stacked against them, that they do not have an option but to pick up the stone. But this is a new dawn. Through close inspection — watching state media, listening to the shifting global narrative, witnessing the renaissance of radical movements, even reading the inscriptions in random airport bathrooms — one discovers that this is a new dawn. Zionism may remain a formidable opponent, but it is also an aging, trembling beast, blinded by its own significance, unpredictable as it may be. Sometimes it pounces on you and pierces its fangs in your flesh. Sometimes it is but a paper tiger. 

And it is this discovery that not only shatters the myth of colonial invincibility, but it reminds us that liberation is attainable, the future is within reach. Amid the unrelenting airstrikes and the havoc of demolished cities, it might seem frivolous to fixate on the blossoming jasmine. But we owe it ourselves to look at everything, to look for everything. To see the picture with all of its details. As deadly and treacherous and unrelenting as it is, the Nakba will not last forever. The world is changing because it must. If seeds can germinate in the inferno, so can revolution. On the phone, my mother tells me, rain is coming and God is almighty.

Mohammed El-Kurd Mohammed El-Kurd is a writer and poet from Jerusalem, occupied Palestine. He is the Culture Editor at Mondoweiss.

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How can there be beauty in the words that describe such horrible death and destruction for the Palestinians?

Mohammed El-Kurd does so, because he mixes the heinous death and destruction being inflicted upon Palestinians by Israel with the whiff of hope.

Eloquent words, moving words. How sad that they describe an ongoing tragedy. A tragedy in which we are complicit.

Just a simple thank you. Until and unless Palestine is restored, the world will not have justice or peace. I hope as I know you do, we live to see Palestine from the River to the Sea. Thank you.

“ Freedom fighters understand that their opponent is Goliath, that the odds are stacked against them, that they do not have an option but to pick up the stone.” _________________________________________________________

This logic, taught since childhood, has distanced liberation and will fail to capitalize on the political support now existing in the world.

This political problem will be solved politically, not by rocks or by rifles. IMO, to co-exist will take a political strategy developed by secularists from both sides. Sadly, this seems a dream.

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  4. What's the Plural of Thesis? (Thesises? Theses?)

    thesis is plural

  5. WHAT IS A THESIS? noun, plural the·ses1.a proposition stated or put

    thesis is plural

  6. What's the Plural of Thesis? (Thesises? Theses?)

    thesis is plural

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COMMENTS

  1. The Plural of Thesis

    "Theses" is the only way to make the noun "thesis" plural. Confusion arises because some mistakenly believe that all nouns ending in "s" should form a plural that adds "es" to the end of the word. When a noun ends with "is," you need to replace the "is" with an "es" to form the plural. This is because its plural form derives from Greek.

  2. What Is the Plural of Thesis

    Thesis becomes theses in plural form for two reasons: 1) The word thesis has a Greek root, and theses is how it is pluralized in that original language. 2) There are many English words ending with -is that take on -es endings when pluralized: e.g., crisis becomes crises. The pluralization isn't all that unique.

  3. Thesis Definition & Meaning

    The meaning of THESIS is a dissertation embodying results of original research and especially substantiating a specific view; especially : one written by a candidate for an academic degree. ... But a thesis may also be an idea; so in the course of the paper the student may put forth several theses (notice the plural form) and attempt to prove ...

  4. THESIS Definition & Meaning

    Thesis definition: a proposition stated or put forward for consideration, especially one to be discussed and proved or to be maintained against objections. See examples of THESIS used in a sentence.

  5. thesis

    Noun [ edit] thesis (plural theses) ( rhetoric) A proposition or statement supported by arguments. (by extension) A lengthy essay written to establish the validity of a thesis (sense 1.1), especially one submitted in order to complete the requirements for a non- doctoral degree in the US and a doctoral degree in the UK; a dissertation .

  6. What's the Plural of Thesis? (Thesises? Theses?)

    Thesis, which means "proposition", and derives from Greek, is a singular noun. The plural of thesis is theses. Started Grammarflex (ing) in 2022—been a word nerd and writing enthusiast ever since. (BA, MA in phil).

  7. THESIS

    THESIS meaning: 1. a long piece of writing on a particular subject, especially one that is done for a higher…. Learn more.

  8. THESIS

    THESIS definition: 1. a long piece of writing on a particular subject, especially one that is done for a higher…. Learn more.

  9. thesis noun

    Collocations Scientific research Scientific research Theory. formulate/ advance a theory/ hypothesis; build/ construct/ create/ develop a simple/ theoretical/ mathematical model; develop/ establish/ provide/ use a theoretical/ conceptual framework; advance/ argue/ develop the thesis that…; explore an idea/ a concept/ a hypothesis; make a prediction/ an inference

  10. THESIS Definition & Meaning

    Thesis definition: a proposition stated or put forward for consideration, especially one to be discussed and proved or to be maintained against objections. See examples of THESIS used in a sentence.

  11. THESES

    THESES meaning: 1. plural of thesis 2. plural of thesis . Learn more.

  12. Plural of Thesis: A Quick Guide for English Learners

    The plural of thesis is "theses.". In English, most nouns form the plural by adding an "s" at the end. However, "thesis" is one of the few exceptions to this rule. The word "thesis" has a Greek root, and "theses" is how it is pluralized in that original language. Singular.

  13. THESIS definition in American English

    thesis in American English. (ˈθisɪs) noun Word forms: plural -ses (-siz) 1. a proposition stated or put forward for consideration, esp. one to be discussed and proved or to be maintained against objections. He vigorously defended his thesis on the causes of war. 2. a subject for a composition or essay. 3.

  14. Whats the Plural of Thesis: Understanding Singular and Plural Forms

    The plural of "thesis" adheres to the Greek-rooted pattern, changing the singular -is to a plural -es. Accurate use of "thesis" and "theses" reflects scholarly precision in both written and oral communication. Awareness of correct pluralization extends to other similar nouns ending in -sis, emphasizing the importance of understanding language origins.

  15. Thesis Definition & Meaning

    plural theses / ˈθiːˌsiːz/. Britannica Dictionary definition of THESIS. [count] 1. : a long piece of writing on a particular subject that is done to earn a degree at a university. She wrote her thesis on Renaissance Nativity scenes. a master's/doctoral thesis on the effects of global warming. 2. formal : a statement that someone wants to ...

  16. THESIS definition and meaning

    7 meanings: 1. a dissertation resulting from original research, esp when submitted by a candidate for a degree or diploma 2. a.... Click for more definitions.

  17. thesis, n. meanings, etymology and more

    There are eight meanings listed in OED's entry for the noun thesis. See 'Meaning & use' for definitions, usage, and quotation evidence. thesis has developed meanings and uses in subjects including. prosody (Middle English) music (Middle English) rhetoric (late 1500s) logic (late 1500s) education (late 1700s) philosophy (1830s)

  18. Thesis

    Etymology. The term thesis comes from the Greek word θέσις, meaning "something put forth", and refers to an intellectual proposition. Dissertation comes from the Latin dissertātiō, meaning "discussion". Aristotle was the first philosopher to define the term thesis.. A 'thesis' is a supposition of some eminent philosopher that conflicts with the general opinion...for to take notice when ...

  19. THESES

    THESES definition: 1. plural of thesis 2. plural of thesis . Learn more.

  20. What is the plural of thesis?

    The plural form of thesis is theses . Find more words! Many scientists, including people writing doctoral theses, had access to the bones, and they were laboriously studied. They can continue classes or use the research as their master's theses and doctoral dissertations. Today, most universities require their students to submit electronic ...

  21. What Is a Thesis?

    Revised on April 16, 2024. A thesis is a type of research paper based on your original research. It is usually submitted as the final step of a master's program or a capstone to a bachelor's degree. Writing a thesis can be a daunting experience. Other than a dissertation, it is one of the longest pieces of writing students typically complete.

  22. Plural of thesis

    The plural of thesis is theses. The answer is: 👍. Helpful ( 0) 💡. Interesting ( 0) 😄. Funny ( 0) 🤔.

  23. Rain is Coming

    The thesis has been consistent: pairing "anniversary" and "Nakba" in the same sentence is a misalliance; the time frame, 76 years, is a miscalculation. ... plural, their wrists, big and ...