20+ Best Words to Describe Problem, Adjectives for Problem

In the tapestry of human existence, problems are the knots that challenge our journey and stimulate growth. A problem can be defined as a puzzling situation or difficulty that hinders progress or causes discomfort. While grappling with problems is an inherent part of life, understanding and articulating them effectively can pave the way for ingenious solutions. In this blog post, we will delve into the realm of words used to describe various problems, empowering ourselves with a comprehensive vocabulary to express and address the intricacies of life’s challenges.

Adjectives for Problem

Here are the 20 Most Popular adjectives for the problem:

  • Exasperating
  • Frustrating
  • Intractable
  • Labyrinthine
  • Multifaceted
  • Quandary-inducing
  • Recalcitrant

Adjectives for “serious problem”:

Adjectives for “problem solver”:.

  • Resourceful

Adjectives for “problem child”:

  • Troublesome
  • Challenging
  • Mischievous
  • Uncooperative

Adjectives for “Good problem”:

  • Stimulating
  • Thought-provoking
  • Transformative

Words to Describe Problem with Meanings

  • Baffling : Puzzling and confusing.
  • Complex : Intricate and involved.
  • Daunting : Intimidating and overwhelming.
  • Exasperating : Irritating and infuriating.
  • Frustrating : Annoying and discouraging.
  • Grueling : Exhausting and demanding.
  • Hurdlesome : Full of obstacles and challenges.
  • Intractable : Difficult to solve or manage.
  • Jarring : Disturbing and incongruous.
  • Knotty : Complicated and intricate.
  • Labyrinthine : Intricate and convoluted.
  • Multifaceted : Having many aspects or features.
  • Niggling : Annoyingly minor or persistent.
  • Onerous : Burdensome and taxing.
  • Perplexing : Confusing and bewildering.
  • Quandary-inducing : Causing a state of uncertainty.
  • Recalcitrant : Uncooperative and resistant.
  • Strenuous : Demanding physical effort and energy.
  • Tedious : Boring and monotonous.
  • Vexing : Annoying and irritating.

Example Sentences for Problem Adjectives

  • The baffling riddle stumped all the detectives.
  • Solving the complex equation required advanced math skills.
  • Climbing the steep mountain was daunting but thrilling.
  • Her exasperating habits tested his patience daily.
  • Fixing the broken computer proved frustrating and time-consuming.
  • The marathon was a grueling test of endurance.
  • The project’s hurdlesome nature caused delays.
  • The negotiation with the stubborn client was intractable .
  • The sudden thunder was jarring and frightening.
  • Untangling the knotty problem required innovative thinking.
  • Navigating through the labyrinthine city streets was challenging.
  • The multifaceted issue needed a comprehensive approach.
  • His niggling injury hindered his performance in the game.
  • The onerous task of cleaning the house fell on her.
  • The ancient script’s meaning remained perplexing to scholars.
  • The quandary-inducing choices left her undecided.
  • The recalcitrant child refused to eat his vegetables.
  • Completing the intense workout was strenuous but rewarding.
  • The tedious lecture made the students sleepy.
  • The vexing noise outside disturbed his concentration.

Explore More Words:

Words to Describe Strategy

Words to Describe Service

Words to Describe Money

How to describe a problem in writing?

A problem in writing can be described by articulating the specific issue or challenge being faced, often with clear and concise language to convey its nature and complexity.

What is a problem noun or adjective?

“Problem” can function as both a noun and an adjective. As a noun, it refers to a difficulty or challenge, while as an adjective, it describes something related to or characterized by problems.

What is a sentence for the problem?

“The lack of funding posed a significant problem for the research project.”

Adjectives for Problem

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100 Powerful Resume Adjectives that Can Help Make Your Resume More Compelling

11 min read · Updated on February 22, 2024

Ken Chase

When it comes to resumes, it's not just what you say; it's how you say it that determines its impact on the reader.

The resume creation process is notoriously challenging for many people. Too often, job candidates end up with resumes that are dry, dull, and anything but compelling. Even when you manage to meticulously organize all the right details into a coherent narrative, the end product can leave the reader unimpressed if the words you use fail to make your case. One of the most important things that you can do to create a compelling resume is to understand which adjectives you can use to powerfully sell your experiences, skills, and accomplishments.

In this post, we will explore 100 of the most powerful resume adjectives and offer some simple tips that can help you better determine where and how to use power adjectives in your resume. 

For ease of reading, we have separated these adjectives into groupings that reflect their best uses within any resume setting:

Adjectives to...

describe communication abilities

illustrate your flexibility

describe your attitude about work

expand on your management skills

describe your analytical and problem-solving skills

illustrate your organizational abilities

describe your teamwork skills

describe your leadership abilities

highlight time management skills

demonstrate your creative thinking

10 Resume adjectives that can powerfully describe your communication abilities

Most job seekers claim to have good communication skills and will often refer to themselves as great communicators in their resumes or during interviews. All too often, however, they will use words and phrases that are stale or carry negative connotations. For example, you might consider yourself an aggressive negotiator who can effectively secure a deal through sheer force of will and sound reasoning. But what would a hiring manager think when they hear you use the word “aggressive” in that instance?

Instead of saying “aggressive”, you should use a softer but equally descriptive word like “assertive.” You should also avoid tired phrases like “easy to understand” and opt for words like “clear” or “coherent” instead. Instead of describing yourself as a “people person” use the word “personable.” With that in mind, here are 10 great resume adjectives you can use to describe your communication abilities:

10 Resume adjectives you can use to illustrate your flexibility

Instead of simply declaring that you are flexible in the workplace, you should try to use resume adjectives that illustrate that flexibility in a more creative way. The following adjectives can provide hiring managers with a more insightful understanding of your ability to deal with change and tell a much more compelling statement about the type of employee they would get if they decided to hire you.

Multifaceted

Open-minded

10 Resume adjectives that describe your attitude about work

Are you a hard worker who will give your all to the company that hires you? You can say those words to a hiring manager, but what does that really mean to any prospective employer? The powerful adjectives listed below can better describe your overall attitude and work ethic in a more detailed and compelling way, painting a clearer picture of how you will approach your job.

Enterprising

Enthusiastic

Industrious

10 Resume adjectives that expand on your management skills

Management candidates often use the same language to describe their styles and abilities: well-coordinated, focused on productivity and meeting goals, people-oriented, etc. A resume that includes those claims can easily get lost in the shuffle, along with a hundred other resumes that repeat those same words and phrases. To get noticed, you need to use powerful resume adjectives like the ones listed below to juice up your resume and stand out from the crowd.

Compassionate

Detail-oriented

Fast-learning

10 Resume adjectives to use when describing your analytical and problem-solving skills

Analytical problem-solvers are a dime a dozen these days—at least they are if you only rely on how people describe themselves in resumes. Unfortunately, those buzzwords have become so overused that they have all but lost meaning. They are now almost nothing more than generalized descriptions of skills that should require much more elaboration. The good news is that you can provide that detailed look at your analytical and problem-solving skills by including some of these powerful resume adjectives.

Inquisitive

10 Resume adjectives that illustrate your organizational abilities

Does your resume describe you as organized? What do you think a hiring manager thinks when they read the word “organized” in your resume summary or skills section? That's right; not much of anything at all. To really convey your organizational skills, you need to use adjectives that drill down to the habits and work styles that make you an organized employee. For example:

Businesslike

Comprehensive

10 Resume adjectives that are useful for describing your teamwork skills

“Teamwork” might make the dream work, but it's not a great word to focus on in your resume. Why? Because it's another one of those words that get overused. More importantly, it really doesn't describe the qualities that make you a great team player. However, the adjectives we listed for you below will achieve that goal for you by illustrating the character traits and attitudes that help you function effectively in any group setting.

Collaborative

Cooperative

Encouraging

10 Resume adjectives you can use to describe your leadership abilities

Great leaders never trumpet their leadership abilities. After all, they don't need to boast about being good leaders; their actions and attitudes do the bragging for them. So, if you have great leadership skills, don't just say that in your resume. Instead, use some of the compelling adjectives below to make that case for you.

Accountable

Disciplined

Motivational

Resourceful

10 Resume adjectives that highlight time management skills

Companies want to know that potential employees can manage their time effectively. As a result, it is important to be able to convince any prospective employer that you have the time management  skills needed to be as productive as they expect. To make that case, you need to do more than simply claim that you know how to manage your own time. You need to describe qualities that they can reasonably expect to help you achieve that efficiency and productivity. These resume adjectives are great options to help them reach that conclusion.

Conscientious

Goal-oriented

Self-managing

Streamlined

Well-organized

10 Powerful adjectives to demonstrate your creative thinking

Today's top companies are always in the market for creative thinkers to add to their teams. That probably explains why so many job seekers insist on describing themselves in those terms on their resumes. But like other tired phrases, those words can easily be dismissed by any hiring manager who wants to see some hint of evidence that you really are creative. One way to demonstrate that creativity is to get creative with the resume adjectives you use to describe your innovative approach to work. Try some of these resume adjectives to really highlight that creative thinking:

Forward-thinking

Ground-breaking

Imaginative

Progressive

Revolutionary

Unconventional

Adjectives you should never include in a resume

Throughout the sections above, we have pointed out why some of the most commonly used skill descriptors are too broad or stale to make for compelling descriptions in your resume. Obviously, those are not the only descriptive words that you should avoid when you are creating your resume. In fact, there are a whole host of commonly overused or inappropriate adjectives that people frequently choose for their resume descriptions.

For example, does your resume include words like “proactive” or “synergistic”? If so, nix them. Likewise, you can omit clever words like “seasoned” from your document, as well as overused words like “hard-working”. While they have long been trendy descriptors used by many thousands of job seekers, they are now considered more than a little cliché.

You should also avoid using words that sound subjective. For example, don't describe yourself as honest, smart, or loyal. If you are those things, the hiring manager will notice from your resume or interview. More importantly, those traits are often relative. You may think you are loyal, but your definition of loyalty and someone else's may be dramatically different. Stick to demonstrable facts that can be objectively verified.

There are also some words that can create negative emotions for those who read them. Yes, you might think of yourself as ambitious, but should you describe yourself in those terms? Not in a resume. The word competitive is another one that might sound innocent enough in casual conversation but might not sound so attractive to a hiring manager who reads your resume.

Finally, you should avoid using words that seem like you're stating the obvious. Never say that you are professional; it should be assumed and demonstrated. Other obvious words include qualified, responsible, and knowledgeable. If you think about it for a few minutes, you can probably produce your own list of adjectives that are just too obvious to be useful in any resume.

How to use resume adjectives properly

To make the best use of these adjectives and others like them, you need to know when and where to use them in your resume. There are three main areas where they can help you create a more compelling narrative: 

your resume summary

your work experience section 

your skills section

Why you need resume adjectives in your resume summary

Your  resume summary is designed to be a condensed elevator pitch that captures the hiring manager's attention and brevity is vital to achieving that goal. The judicious use of powerful resume adjectives can help you create a compelling introduction in a brief way.

How resume adjectives can juice up your work experience

Good resume adjectives can enable you to effectively describe your achievements in the experience section of your resume. Be sure to select adjectives that highlight the skills and competencies you will need for the position you are seeking, to help the hiring manager quickly understand the value you can provide for their company.

Resume adjectives can add flavor to your skills

The skills section on any resume is even briefer than the resume summary, but that doesn't mean that adjectives can't enhance its effectiveness. Choose strong adjectives to couple with your skills to give that section a little more flavor and descriptiveness. 

Tips to guide you as you incorporate powerful resume adjectives into your resume

Finally, we would be remiss if we failed to provide some tips that you can use to guide your usage of resume adjectives. After all, you don't want to simply start inserting adjectives in a random way. Fortunately, there are some helpful things that you can do to ensure that you make the best use of resume adjectives. For example:

Do not use too many adjectives. While it might seem that more is better than less, that is seldom the case when it comes to descriptive words. Too many resume adjectives will give the impression that you're trying too hard to make your case.

Adjectives can embellish your skills and experiences, but they cannot take their place. Use them for elaboration and emphasis only.

Always make sure that you can justify an adjective's use with real achievements and data. Overhyping your skills or experiences could work against you if the hiring manager sees no evidence to support your claims.

Carefully choose adjectives from this post or other sources, and make sure that they are relevant to your experience, skills, and the job description .

Link adjectives to powerful  action verbs that help you tell a compelling story about your value as an employee.

When it comes to creating a compelling resume, you need to do as much as possible in a limited amount of space. To that end, the words you choose will ultimately determine your resume's effectiveness. Knowing which resume adjectives to use and when to use them can help ensure that you craft your career narrative in a way that maximizes your opportunity for success.

Wondering whether your resume is making adequate use of compelling and powerful adjectives? Take advantage of our free resume review opportunity to learn whether your resume has what it takes to make the right impression on prospective employers!

Recommended Reading:

How to Maximize Your Resume Action Words to Wow the Employer

Resume Help: Your Resume Questions Answered

Spring Clean Your Resume: Scrub Your Resume of Unclear Language

Related Articles:

Do Hiring Managers Actually Read Cover Letters?

How to Create a Resume With No Education

Why You Lose When You Lie on Your Resume: Learning From Mina Chang

See how your resume stacks up.

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The Top 10 Characteristics of Problem Solvers

The Top 10 Characteristics of Problem Solvers

September 24th, 2017

Have you ever noticed that some people seem to be natural born problem solvers? Look closer, and you’ll discover that problem solving is more a skill than a gift. Effective problem solvers share ten common characteristics.

1. They have an “attitude”!

Simply expressed, effective problem solvers invariably see problems as opportunities, a chance to learn something new, to grow, to succeed where others have failed, or to prove that “it can be done”.  Underlying these attitudes is a deeply held conviction that, with adequate preparation, the right answer will come.

2. They re-define the problem.

Problem solving is a primary consulting skill. Seasoned consultants know that, very often, the initial definition of the problem (by the client) is incorrect or incomplete. They learn to discount statements such as, “Obviously, the problem is that …” and follow their own leadings, but…

3. They have a system.

Perhaps the most common model is the old consulting acronym: DACR/S in which the letters stand for Describe, Analyze, Conclude, and Recommend/Solve. As with many formulas, its usefulness stems from the step-by-step approach it represents. Effective problem solvers take the steps in order and apply them literally. For example, in describing the problem (the first step), they strenuously avoid making premature judgments or ruling out possibilities. In analyzing the information, they are careful that their own prejudices do not interfere. In developing conclusions, they are aware of the need to test them thoroughly. Finally, most astute problem solvers recognize that there is almost always more than one solution, so they develop several alternatives from which to choose.

4. They avoid the experience trap.

The world is becoming increasingly non-linear. Things happen in pairs, triads, and groups and often don’t follow traditional lines from past to present and cause to effect. In such an environment, where synchronicity and simultaneity rather than linearity prevails, past experience must be taken with a grain of salt. Seasoned problem solvers know the pitfalls of relying on what worked in the past as a guide to what will work in the future. They learn to expect the unexpected, illogical, and non-linear.

5. They consider every position as though it were their own.

For effective problem solvers, standing in the other person’s shoes is more than a cute saying. It’s a fundamental way of looking at the problem from every perspective. This ability to shift perspectives quickly and easily is a key characteristic of effective problem solvers. As one especially capable consultant put it, “I take the other fellow’s position, and then I expand upon it until I understand it better than he does”.

6. They recognize conflict as often a prerequisite to solution.

When the stakes are high in a problem situation, the parties are often reluctant to show their hands and cautious about giving away too much. In such instances, managed conflict can be an effective tool for flushing out the real facts of a situation.

7. They listen to their intuition.

Somewhere during the latter stages of the fact-finding (description) process, effective problem solvers experience what can best be called, “inklings”-gut-level feelings about the situation. When this happens, they listen, hypothesize, test and re-test. They realize that, while intuition may be partially innate, effective intuition is overwhelmingly a developed faculty-and they work to develop it!

8. They invariably go beyond “solving the problem”.

On a time scale, just solving the problem at hand brings you to the present, to a point you might call, ground-zero. Truly effective problem solvers push further. They go beyond simply solving the problem to discover the underlying opportunities that often lie concealed within the intricacies of the situation. Implicit in this approach is the premise that every problem is an opportunity in disguise.

9. They seek permanent solutions.

Permanent, as opposed to band-aid solutions, has two characteristics: (1) they address all aspects of the problem, and (2) they are win/win in that they offer acceptable benefits to all parties involved.  Symptomatic problem solving, like bad surgery or dentistry, leaves part of the decay untouched, with the result that, over time, it festers and erupts.  Just for the record, a permanent solution is one that STAYS solved and doesn’t come back to bite you.

10. They gain agreement and commitment from the parties involved.

It’s easy, in the heady rush of finding “the answer” to a problem, to fail to gain agreement and commitment on the part of everyone involved. For effective problem solvers, just “going along” via tacit agreement isn’t enough. There must be explicit statements from all parties that they concur and are willing to commit to the solution. Agreement and concurrence really constitute a third characteristic of the “permanent” solution discussed above, but they are so often ignored that it is important that they be viewed separately.

Written by Shale Paul, Copyright Coach University. All Rights Reserved.

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What Are Problem-Solving Skills? Definition and Examples

Zoe Kaplan

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Forage puts students first. Our blog articles are written independently by our editorial team. They have not been paid for or sponsored by our partners. See our full  editorial guidelines .

Why do employers hire employees? To help them solve problems. Whether you’re a financial analyst deciding where to invest your firm’s money, or a marketer trying to figure out which channel to direct your efforts, companies hire people to help them find solutions. Problem-solving is an essential and marketable soft skill in the workplace. 

So, how can you improve your problem-solving and show employers you have this valuable skill? In this guide, we’ll cover:

Problem-Solving Skills Definition

Why are problem-solving skills important, problem-solving skills examples, how to include problem-solving skills in a job application, how to improve problem-solving skills, problem-solving: the bottom line.

Problem-solving skills are the ability to identify problems, brainstorm and analyze answers, and implement the best solutions. An employee with good problem-solving skills is both a self-starter and a collaborative teammate; they are proactive in understanding the root of a problem and work with others to consider a wide range of solutions before deciding how to move forward. 

Examples of using problem-solving skills in the workplace include:

  • Researching patterns to understand why revenue decreased last quarter
  • Experimenting with a new marketing channel to increase website sign-ups
  • Brainstorming content types to share with potential customers
  • Testing calls to action to see which ones drive the most product sales
  • Implementing a new workflow to automate a team process and increase productivity

Problem-solving skills are the most sought-after soft skill of 2022. In fact, 86% of employers look for problem-solving skills on student resumes, according to the National Association of Colleges and Employers Job Outlook 2022 survey . 

It’s unsurprising why employers are looking for this skill: companies will always need people to help them find solutions to their problems. Someone proactive and successful at problem-solving is valuable to any team.

“Employers are looking for employees who can make decisions independently, especially with the prevalence of remote/hybrid work and the need to communicate asynchronously,” Eric Mochnacz, senior HR consultant at Red Clover, says. “Employers want to see individuals who can make well-informed decisions that mitigate risk, and they can do so without suffering from analysis paralysis.”

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Problem-solving includes three main parts: identifying the problem, analyzing possible solutions, and deciding on the best course of action.

>>MORE: Discover the right career for you based on your skills with a career aptitude test .

Research is the first step of problem-solving because it helps you understand the context of a problem. Researching a problem enables you to learn why the problem is happening. For example, is revenue down because of a new sales tactic? Or because of seasonality? Is there a problem with who the sales team is reaching out to? 

Research broadens your scope to all possible reasons why the problem could be happening. Then once you figure it out, it helps you narrow your scope to start solving it. 

Analysis is the next step of problem-solving. Now that you’ve identified the problem, analytical skills help you look at what potential solutions there might be.

“The goal of analysis isn’t to solve a problem, actually — it’s to better understand it because that’s where the real solution will be found,” Gretchen Skalka, owner of Career Insights Consulting, says. “Looking at a problem through the lens of impartiality is the only way to get a true understanding of it from all angles.”

Decision-Making

Once you’ve figured out where the problem is coming from and what solutions are, it’s time to decide on the best way to go forth. Decision-making skills help you determine what resources are available, what a feasible action plan entails, and what solution is likely to lead to success.

On a Resume

Employers looking for problem-solving skills might include the word “problem-solving” or other synonyms like “ critical thinking ” or “analytical skills” in the job description.

“I would add ‘buzzwords’ you can find from the job descriptions or LinkedIn endorsements section to filter into your resume to comply with the ATS,” Matthew Warzel, CPRW resume writer, advises. Warzel recommends including these skills on your resume but warns to “leave the soft skills as adjectives in the summary section. That is the only place soft skills should be mentioned.”

On the other hand, you can list hard skills separately in a skills section on your resume .

adjectives to describe problem solving

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In a Cover Letter or an Interview

Explaining your problem-solving skills in an interview can seem daunting. You’re required to expand on your process — how you identified a problem, analyzed potential solutions, and made a choice. As long as you can explain your approach, it’s okay if that solution didn’t come from a professional work experience.

“Young professionals shortchange themselves by thinking only paid-for solutions matter to employers,” Skalka says. “People at the genesis of their careers don’t have a wealth of professional experience to pull from, but they do have relevant experience to share.”

Aaron Case, career counselor and CPRW at Resume Genius, agrees and encourages early professionals to share this skill. “If you don’t have any relevant work experience yet, you can still highlight your problem-solving skills in your cover letter,” he says. “Just showcase examples of problems you solved while completing your degree, working at internships, or volunteering. You can even pull examples from completely unrelated part-time jobs, as long as you make it clear how your problem-solving ability transfers to your new line of work.”

Learn How to Identify Problems

Problem-solving doesn’t just require finding solutions to problems that are already there. It’s also about being proactive when something isn’t working as you hoped it would. Practice questioning and getting curious about processes and activities in your everyday life. What could you improve? What would you do if you had more resources for this process? If you had fewer? Challenge yourself to challenge the world around you.

Think Digitally

“Employers in the modern workplace value digital problem-solving skills, like being able to find a technology solution to a traditional issue,” Case says. “For example, when I first started working as a marketing writer, my department didn’t have the budget to hire a professional voice actor for marketing video voiceovers. But I found a perfect solution to the problem with an AI voiceover service that cost a fraction of the price of an actor.”

Being comfortable with new technology — even ones you haven’t used before — is a valuable skill in an increasingly hybrid and remote world. Don’t be afraid to research new and innovative technologies to help automate processes or find a more efficient technological solution.

Collaborate

Problem-solving isn’t done in a silo, and it shouldn’t be. Use your collaboration skills to gather multiple perspectives, help eliminate bias, and listen to alternative solutions. Ask others where they think the problem is coming from and what solutions would help them with your workflow. From there, try to compromise on a solution that can benefit everyone.

If we’ve learned anything from the past few years, it’s that the world of work is constantly changing — which means it’s crucial to know how to adapt . Be comfortable narrowing down a solution, then changing your direction when a colleague provides a new piece of information. Challenge yourself to get out of your comfort zone, whether with your personal routine or trying a new system at work.

Put Yourself in the Middle of Tough Moments

Just like adapting requires you to challenge your routine and tradition, good problem-solving requires you to put yourself in challenging situations — especially ones where you don’t have relevant experience or expertise to find a solution. Because you won’t know how to tackle the problem, you’ll learn new problem-solving skills and how to navigate new challenges. Ask your manager or a peer if you can help them work on a complicated problem, and be proactive about asking them questions along the way.

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What careers are right for you based on your skills? Take this quiz to find out. It’s completely free — you’ll just need to sign up to get your results!

Step 1 of 3

Companies always need people to help them find solutions — especially proactive employees who have practical analytical skills and can collaborate to decide the best way to move forward. Whether or not you have experience solving problems in a professional workplace, illustrate your problem-solving skills by describing your research, analysis, and decision-making process — and make it clear that you’re the solution to the employer’s current problems. 

Looking to learn more workplace professional skills? Check out Two Sigma’s Professional Skills Development Virtual Experience Program .

Image Credit: Christina Morillo / Pexels 

Zoe Kaplan

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adjectives to describe problem solving

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adjectives to describe problem solving

This tool helps you find adjectives for things that you're trying to describe. Also check out ReverseDictionary.org and RelatedWords.org . Here are some adjectives for problem solver : . You can get the definitions of these problem solver adjectives by clicking on them. You might also like some words related to problem solver (and find more here ).

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Words to Describe problem solver

Below is a list of describing words for problem solver . You can sort the descriptive words by uniqueness or commonness using the button above. Sorry if there's a few unusual suggestions! The algorithm isn't perfect, but it does a pretty good job for most common nouns. Here's the list of words that can be used to describe problem solver :

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As you've probably noticed, adjectives for " problem solver " are listed above. Hopefully the above generated list of words to describe problem solver suits your needs.

If you're getting strange results, it may be that your query isn't quite in the right format. The search box should be a simple word or phrase, like "tiger" or "blue eyes". A search for words to describe "people who have blue eyes" will likely return zero results. So if you're not getting ideal results, check that your search term, " problem solver " isn't confusing the engine in this manner.

Note also that if there aren't many problem solver adjectives, or if there are none at all, it could be that your search term has an abiguous part-of-speech. For example, the word "blue" can be an noun and an adjective. This confuses the engine and so you might not get many adjectives describing it. I may look into fixing this in the future. You might also be wondering: What type of word is problem solver ?

The idea for the Describing Words engine came when I was building the engine for Related Words (it's like a thesaurus, but gives you a much broader set of related words, rather than just synonyms). While playing around with word vectors and the " HasProperty " API of conceptnet, I had a bit of fun trying to get the adjectives which commonly describe a word. Eventually I realised that there's a much better way of doing this: parse books!

Project Gutenberg was the initial corpus, but the parser got greedier and greedier and I ended up feeding it somewhere around 100 gigabytes of text files - mostly fiction, including many contemporary works. The parser simply looks through each book and pulls out the various descriptions of nouns.

Hopefully it's more than just a novelty and some people will actually find it useful for their writing and brainstorming, but one neat little thing to try is to compare two nouns which are similar, but different in some significant way - for example, gender is interesting: " woman " versus " man " and " boy " versus " girl ". On an inital quick analysis it seems that authors of fiction are at least 4x more likely to describe women (as opposed to men) with beauty-related terms (regarding their weight, features and general attractiveness). In fact, "beautiful" is possibly the most widely used adjective for women in all of the world's literature, which is quite in line with the general unidimensional representation of women in many other media forms . If anyone wants to do further research into this, let me know and I can give you a lot more data (for example, there are about 25000 different entries for "woman" - too many to show here).

The blueness of the results represents their relative frequency. You can hover over an item for a second and the frequency score should pop up. The "uniqueness" sorting is default, and thanks to my Complicated Algorithm™, it orders them by the adjectives' uniqueness to that particular noun relative to other nouns (it's actually pretty simple). As you'd expect, you can click the "Sort By Usage Frequency" button to adjectives by their usage frequency for that noun.

Special thanks to the contributors of the open-source mongodb which was used in this project.

Please note that Describing Words uses third party scripts (such as Google Analytics and advertisements) which use cookies. To learn more, see the privacy policy .

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adjectives to describe problem solving

Problem-solving synonyms | adjectives

Synonyms for problem-solving as an adjective.

  • analytic examining
  • analytical logical
  • detailed examining, examining and determining
  • penetrating examining, examining and determining
  • systematic logical, examining
  • scientific examining, examining and determining
  • thorough examining and determining
  • diagnostic examining and determining
  • investigative logical
  • rational logical
  • interpretive
  • explanatory
  • inquiring logical
  • inquisitive
  • perspicuous
  • questioning
  • ratiocinative
  • well-grounded
  • pinpointing
  • demonstrative
  • characteristic
  • distinguishing
  • symptomatic

Synonyms for problem-solving

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What is the adjective for "problem solving"?

In this question , I want to say about the drawing which is less artistic and more problem solving . But problem solving is not adjective, as contrast to artistic .

Is there an adjective for problem solving ?

  • adjective-phrases

Community's user avatar

  • 1 What makes you think it's not an adjective? –  Stephie Commented Jul 8, 2015 at 13:17
  • First thought: "V-ing" is an action, right? Second thought: ahhhhhh, I see what you mean. Make it an answer and I'll accept yours. –  Ooker Commented Jul 8, 2015 at 13:25
  • We say "The raptors show problem-solving intelligence." –  TimR Commented Jul 8, 2015 at 13:43
  • @TRomano should I change my question to asking the adjective form for problem solving ? –  Ooker Commented Jul 8, 2015 at 14:17
  • @TRomano But it appears that OP wants a term which can be employed predicatively. And it's not clear whether what's meant is "concerned with solving problems" or "{capable of/engaged in} solving problems". –  StoneyB on hiatus Commented Jul 8, 2015 at 14:39

With the addition of a dash, problem-solving can be used adjectivally before a noun. In fact, a lot of similar adjectivals can be formed with the active participle ending in - ing : habit-forming , all-encompassing , ever-increasing , etc.

English is quite flexible on the way different parts of speech can serve as adjectives. Note that when numerical expressions are used in this way, they are never plural in form. There is a strict rule in English that adjectivals may not be pluralized. That's why you see forms like two-mile hike , three-minute phone call , twenty-year-old girl , etc.

CocoPop's user avatar

  • May I ask what your native language is? –  CocoPop Commented Jul 8, 2015 at 14:22
  • You say: "problem-solving can be used adjectivally before a noun ". What if there is no noun for it? –  Ooker Commented Jul 9, 2015 at 10:09
  • 1 Then it's a noun (no dash): He's good at problem solving. –  CocoPop Commented Jul 10, 2015 at 2:40
  • I mean, is "less artistic and more problem solving" grammatical correct? Artistic is an adj, while problem - solving must be a noun since there is no noun after it. –  Ooker Commented Jul 10, 2015 at 2:45
  • 1 It depends on the entire sentence. If you wanted to list ARTISTIC and PROBLEM-SOLVING as attributes, you might have to give it a little turn: He would make a good curator because he is both artistic and a good problem solver." or "... is artistic and has great problem-solving skills." –  CocoPop Commented Jul 10, 2015 at 12:27

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adjectives to describe problem solving

Smart Adjectives – Describing Words with Examples

adjectives to describe problem solving

When it comes to describing someone who is intelligent and quick-witted, we often turn to the word “smart.” But what if you’re looking for more specific adjectives to paint a clearer picture of their intelligence? In this article, I’ll be sharing a list of adjectives that can be used to describe smart individuals, along with examples to demonstrate their usage.

So, if you’re ready to enhance your descriptive skills and add some variety to your vocabulary, let’s dive into the world of adjectives for smart individuals and explore how they can bring your writing to life.

Table of Contents

How to Describe smart? – Different Scenarios

Describing smart individuals goes beyond the generic label of “smart”. It’s important to use a variety of adjectives to provide a more nuanced portrayal of someone’s intellectual abilities. Here are some scenarios in which you can use different adjectives to describe smart individuals:

1. Academic Excellence

When describing smart individuals in an academic setting, it’s important to highlight their intellectual achievements. Here are some adjectives you can use:

For example, you can say, “I was amazed by Sarah’s gifted understanding of advanced mathematics.” or “John’s brilliant insights in the science lab never fail to impress me.”

2. Problem-Solving Skills

Smart individuals often excel in problem-solving situations. Here are some adjectives to describe their ability to find solutions:

3. Intellectual Curiosity

Smart individuals are often characterized by their thirst for knowledge and intellectual curiosity. Here are some adjectives to describe this aspect of their intelligence:

For example, you can say, “Olivia’s inquisitive nature makes her an ideal candidate for scientific research.” or “Daniel’s intellectually curious mind is evident in his vast knowledge across various fields.”

Remember, employing a diverse range of adjectives when describing smart individuals allows for a more detailed and comprehensive portrayal of their intellectual abilities. Using these adjectives will help you enhance your descriptive skills and expand your vocabulary.

Describing Words for smart in English

When it comes to describing intelligent individuals, it’s important to go beyond the generic label of “smart” and use a variety of descriptive adjectives. These adjectives not only provide a more nuanced portrayal of someone’s intellectual abilities, but they also help us expand our vocabulary and enhance our descriptive skills. In this section, I’ll introduce you to some adjectives that can be used to describe smart individuals, along with examples to help you understand their usage.

Remember, using a diverse range of adjectives not only makes your descriptions more interesting but also adds depth to your portrayal of smart individuals. By incorporating these adjectives into your vocabulary, you can create a more accurate and vivid picture of someone’s intellectual abilities.

Adjectives for smart

Positive adjectives for smart with 12 example sentences.

When describing smart individuals, it’s important to use a range of positive adjectives that highlight their intelligence and capabilities. Here are some examples of positive adjectives you can use:

Use these adjectives to create vivid descriptions of smart individuals, adding depth and interest to your writing.

Negative Adjectives for smart with 5 Example Sentences

While it’s important to focus on positive attributes when describing intelligent individuals, it can also be helpful to know negative adjectives that can be used constructively. Here are some examples of negative adjectives that can be applied to smart individuals:

Remember, using a variety of adjectives adds depth and nuance to your descriptions, creating a more engaging and accurate portrayal of smart individuals.

Synonyms and Antonyms with Example Sentences

Synonyms for smart, antonyms for smart.

Using a range of adjectives, including both synonyms and antonyms, allows for a more well-rounded and accurate portrayal of intelligent individuals. It adds depth and nuance to descriptions, ensuring a more engaging and complete picture.

By using a diverse range of adjectives, we can add depth and nuance to our descriptions, creating a more engaging and accurate portrayal of smart individuals. This not only helps us to better understand and appreciate the complexity of intelligence, but it also allows us to communicate more effectively and vividly. So, whether you are writing a character description, a professional bio, or simply want to expand your vocabulary, remember the power of adjectives in capturing the essence of intelligence.

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Synonyms for Problem-solving

802 other terms for problem-solving - words and phrases with similar meaning.

Synonyms for Problem-solving

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noun as in difficulty; bad situation

Strongest matches

  • complication

Strong matches

  • botheration
  • disagreement
  • predicament

Weak matches

  • can of worms
  • disputed point
  • point at issue

noun as in puzzle, question

  • illustration
  • brainteaser
  • cliff-hanger
  • mind-boggler
  • sixty-four thousand dollar question

Example Sentences

We can now create video-game quality simulations to evaluate complex skills like creativity or problem-solving.

The competition will be an ersatz astronaut training program of sorts, including physical challenges, as well as puzzles and problem-solving tasks, as well as emotionally challenging scenarios, according to Deadline.

Lindsey Graham has changed after 25 years in Washington into someone who puts his political fortunes ahead of problem-solving.

When you have armed soldiers on the streets, I think, as a public affairs officer, that’s a perception problem in and of itself.

The problem in Venezuela is not the oil, it’s the political system.

Several times, either because they forgot or they had a technical problem, they connected directly, and we could see them.

Every once in a while, they act swiftly and acknowledge the problem.

Part of the problem is the mandate of the war and the means with which the U.S. is fighting it do not match up.

The third problem is the evidence of corroborating witnesses.

But this physical involvement, or lack of it, is only part of the problem.

And now let me come to the second problem we opened up in connection with college education—the problem of its extension.

No man can believe it who tests it by his reason in the same way in which he would test any modern problem.

But the essential problem of to-day is to know how far we are to depart from its principles.

We notice that more attention is given to the problem of placing a feature than to that of making a likeness of it.

But the West is not in its essence a time problem; there, they can wait—next week—next month.

Related Words

Words related to problem are not direct synonyms, but are associated with the word problem . Browse related words to learn more about word associations.

noun as in trouble

  • deep trouble
  • dire straits
  • disappointment
  • inconvenience

noun as in difference of opinion

  • altercation
  • apple of discord
  • controversy
  • grounds for war
  • matter at hand
  • point in question
  • tender spot

noun as in trouble, inconvenience

  • aggravation
  • exasperation
  • molestation
  • pain in the neck

noun as in annoyance

  • disturbance

Viewing 5 / 73 related words

On this page you'll find 128 synonyms, antonyms, and words related to problem, such as: complication, dilemma, dispute, headache, issue, and obstacle.

From Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

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Adjectives to indicate a problem's size (in good writing style)

I would like to compile a list of adjectives that can be used to give information about the "bigness" of a problem.

Say for example in a report about the role of stress-related work disability a sentence like

In the healthcare sector, this problem is particularly xxxxxxxxx

Now, what? Big? Eminent? Prominent? Large? Virulent? Heavy? Important? Aggravating? Grave? Sizeable? Serious?

I suppose all of them would carry the message, but most of them would sound awkward. So, what would be good choices? What adjectives would usually be used in a formal context like a written report?

(I tried to give a very concrete example, but the question is meant more generally: adjectives expressing size that are good for combining with the word "problem".)

  • word-choice
  • writing-style

Christian Geiselmann's user avatar

  • 1 You can use pretty much anything you want. You need to pick based on how formal you wish to be and to what extent you wish to employ hyperbole. –  Hot Licks Commented May 22, 2017 at 1:05

3 Answers 3

Well, what is the "big" aspect of the problem?

If the effect is large, you might describe it as severe .

If the risk it poses is imminent, call it critical .

If it will be unpleasant to solve, it's thorny , but if it's merely difficult to solve, then it's knotty .

If it has resisted attempts to solve it in the past, it is obdurate or refractory .

If it is causing irritation in those who attempt to solve it, it's frustrating ; if it causes confusion, it's baffling .

There are dozens of others.

If it weakens you, it's debilitating ; if it permanently damages your ability to function, it's crippling .

If it destroys structures, it's devastating ; if it drains you financially, it's ruinous .

If it's difficult to detect, it's insidious ; if the problem is so great, it exceeds your ability to deal with it, it's overwhelming .

If the damage is widespread and severe, it's disastrous ; if it's also sudden, it's catastrophic.

Michael Lorton's user avatar

  • Thank you, that's extremely helpful, especially with the words put in their appropriate context. - As you say there are dozens of others, would you like to add another 5 or 10 that come to your mind first? –  Christian Geiselmann Commented May 23, 2017 at 8:11
  • 1 @ChristianGeiselmann -- see edit –  Michael Lorton Commented May 23, 2017 at 8:48

In the healthcare sector, this problem is particularly prevalent

prevalent - widespread or current, superior in force or power; predominant.

Examples from the web: 1 . "...diseases which were prevalent , at different periods of the year, in each division of the army" 2 . "... it became prevalent to such a degree that the trees were covered by it"

Community's user avatar

Given your sentence, I would suggest the word "pronounced". This would ALSO let you remove the word "particularly" for most cases.

In the healthcare sector, this problem is ~pronounced~.

Rather than a word of "magnitude" alone it suggests a "noteworthiness"

pronounced from Oxford Living Dictionaries ADJECTIVE Very noticeable or marked; conspicuous. ‘he had a pronounced squint’ ‘The new field of imagery may not provoke the passions of an image war, but we are often troubled by a pronounced need to know.’ Synonyms: noticeable, marked, strong, conspicuous, striking, distinct, decided, definite, prominent, notable, unmistakable, inescapable, obvious, evident, plain, clear, recognizable, identifiable

Tom22's user avatar

  • Very helpful, thank you, including for the list of synonyms, which gives me some more ideas. –  Christian Geiselmann Commented May 22, 2017 at 0:13

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adjectives to describe problem solving

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  5. Adjective to Describe Problem Solving Skills

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COMMENTS

  1. Describing Words for Problem Solver

    Are you a natural problem solver? Do you have a knack for finding solutions to even the most complex challenges? If so, you'll be thrilled to discover a whole array of adjectives that perfectly describe your problem-solving abilities. In this article, I'll introduce you to a variety of powerful and descriptive words that capture the… Read More »Describing Words for Problem Solver ...

  2. Adjectives for Problems: Examples & Describing Words

    Adjectives for Problems: Examples & Describing Words Hey there! Have you ever struggled to find the right words to describe a problem? Well, fret no more! In this article, I'll be sharing a comprehensive list of adjectives that you can use to describe different types of problems. Whether you're writing an essay, crafting a story, or simply looking to expand your vocabulary, these ...

  3. 80 Synonyms & Antonyms for PROBLEM-SOLVING

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  4. 20+ Best Words to Describe Problem, Adjectives for Problem

    How to describe a problem in writing? A problem in writing can be described by articulating the specific issue or challenge being faced, often with clear and concise language to convey its nature and complexity. What is a problem noun or adjective? "Problem" can function as both a noun and an adjective. As a noun, it refers to a difficulty or challenge, while as an adjective, it describes ...

  5. 100 Powerful Resume Adjectives that Can Help Make Your Resume More

    10 Resume adjectives to use when describing your analytical and problem-solving skills Analytical problem-solvers are a dime a dozen these days—at least they are if you only rely on how people describe themselves in resumes.

  6. What is another word for problem-solving

    Synonyms for problem-solving include analytic, analytical, diagnostic, logical, methodical, scientific, systematic, investigative, pinpointing and rational. Find more ...

  7. 19 Adjectives for Problem-solving

    Another word for Problem-solving? Words for Problem-solving (adjectives).

  8. Problem solving as a Adjective in Thesaurus

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  9. Synonyms for Problem solver

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  10. 999+ Words to Describe Problem

    Words to Describe problem As you've probably noticed, adjectives for " problem " are listed above. According to the algorithm that drives this website, the top 5 adjectives for "problem" are: unbelievably huge and complex, unusual and very difficult, major esthetic, worst outstanding, and technical.

  11. The Top 10 Characteristics of Problem Solvers

    Perhaps the most common model is the old consulting acronym: DACR/S in which the letters stand for Describe, Analyze, Conclude, and Recommend/Solve. As with many formulas, its usefulness stems from the step-by-step approach it represents. Effective problem solvers take the steps in order and apply them literally. For example, in describing the problem (the first step), they strenuously avoid ...

  12. Describing Words for Skills: Examples & More

    Are you looking for the perfect words to describe your skills? Well, you're in luck! In this article, I'll be sharing a comprehensive list of adjectives that you can use to showcase your abilities. Whether you're updating your resume, preparing for an interview, or simply want to express yourself more effectively, having a strong vocabulary… Read More »Describing Words for Skills ...

  13. What Are Problem-Solving Skills? Definition and Examples

    Problem-solving skills are valuable soft skills that help you identify the root of a problem, analyze potential solutions, and decide what to do.

  14. 13+ Words to Describe Problem solver

    Words to Describe problem solver. As you've probably noticed, adjectives for " problem solver " are listed above. According to the algorithm that drives this website, the top 5 adjectives for "problem solver" are: best and fastest, obsessive, consummate, fastest, and talented. There are 8 other words to describe problem solver listed above.

  15. Problem-solving synonyms that belongs to adjectives

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  16. How to describe a problem so that everyone understands it

    An important first step in the problem solving process is knowing how to describe a problem so that everyone understands it and collaborates in solving it.

  17. What is the adjective for "problem solving"?

    3. With the addition of a dash, problem-solving can be used adjectivally before a noun. In fact, a lot of similar adjectivals can be formed with the active participle ending in - ing: habit-forming, all-encompassing, ever-increasing, etc. English is quite flexible on the way different parts of speech can serve as adjectives.

  18. Smart Adjectives

    Astute: Use this word to describe someone with sharp and perceptive problem-solving skills. Analytical: This adjective highlights someone's ability to analyze problems and think critically.

  19. Synonyms for Problem-solving

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  21. Adjectives to indicate a problem's size (in good writing style)

    1 I would like to compile a list of adjectives that can be used to give information about the "bigness" of a problem.

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