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Food Science and Technology Department

Department of food science and technology: dissertations, theses, and student research.

Cellulosome-forming Modules in Gut Microbiome and Virome , Jerry Akresi

Influence of Overcooking on Food Digestibility and in vitro Fermentation , Wensheng Ding

Development of an Intact Mass Spectrometry Method for the Detection and Differentiation of Major Bovine Milk Proteins , Emily F. Harley-Dowell

Optimizing Soil Nutrient Management to Improve Dry Edible Bean Yield and Protein Quality , Emily Jundt

Fusarium Species Structure in Nebraska Corn , Yuchu Ma

Evaluating Salmonella Cross Contamination In Raw Chicken Thighs In Simulated Post-Chill Tanks , Raziya Sadat

Evaluation of Human Microbiota-Associated (HMA) Porcine Models to Study the Human Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Nirosh D. Aluthge

Differential Effects of Protein Isolates on the Gut Microbiome under High and Low Fiber Conditions , Marissa Behounek

Evaluating the Microbial Quality and Use of Antimicrobials in Raw Pet Foods , Leslie Pearl Cancio

High Pressure Processing of Cashew Milk , Rachel Coggins

Occurrence of Hydroxyproline in Proteomes of Higher Plants , Olivia Huffman

Evaluation of Wheat-Specific Peptide Targets for Use in the Development of ELISA and Mass Spectrometry-Based Detection Methods , Jessica Humphrey

Safety Assessment of Novel Foods and Food Proteins , Niloofar Moghadam Maragheh

Identification of Gut Microbiome Composition Responsible for Gas Production , Erasme Mutuyemungu

Antimicrobial Efficacy of a Citric Acid/Hydrochloric Acid Blend, Peroxyacetic Acid, and Sulfuric Acid Against Salmonella on Inoculated Non-Conventional Raw Chicken Products , Emma Nakimera

Evaluating the Efficacy of Germination and Fermentation in Producing Biologically Active Peptides from Pulses , Ashley Newton

Development of a Targeted Mass Spectrometry Method for the Detection and Quantification of Peanut Protein in Incurred Food Matrices , Sara Schlange

Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Mucosal Attachment and Colonization by Clostridioides difficile , Ben Sidner

Comparative Assessment of Human Exposure to Antibiotic-Resistant Salmonella due to the Consumption of Various Food Products in the United States , Yifan Wu

Risk-based Evaluation of Treatments for Water Used at a Pre-harvest Stage to Mitigate Microbial Contamination of Fresh Raspberry in Chile , Constanza Avello Lefno

INVESTIGATING THE PREVALENCE AND CONTROL OF LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES IN FOOD FACILITIES , Cyril Nsom Ayuk Etaka

Food Sensitivity in Individuals with Altered and Unaltered Digestive Tracts , Walker Carson

Risk Based Simulations of Sporeformers Population Throughout the Dairy Production and Processing Chain: Evaluating On-Farm Interventions in Nebraska Dairy Farms , Rhaisa A. Crespo Ramírez

Dietary Fiber Utilization in the Gut: The Role of Human Gut Microbes in the Degradation and Consumption of Xylose-Based Carbohydrates , Elizabeth Drey

Understanding the Roles of Nutrient-Niche Dynamics In Clostridioides difficile Colonization in Human Microbiome Colonized Minibioreactors , Xiaoyun Huang

Effect of Radiofrequency Assisted Thermal Processing on the Structural, Functional and Biological Properties of Egg White Powder , Alisha Kar

Synthesizing Inactivation Efficacy of Treatments against Bacillus cereus through Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis and Evaluating Inactivation Efficacy of Commercial Cleaning Products against B. cereus Biofilms and Spores Using Standardized Methods , Minho Kim

Gut Community Response to Wheat Bran and Pinto Bean , ShuEn Leow

The Differences of Prokaryotic Pan-genome Analysis on Complete Genomes and Simulated Metagenome-Assembled Genomes , Tang Li

Studies on milling and baking quality and in-vitro protein digestibility of historical and modern wheats , Sujun Liu

The Application of Mathematical Optimization and Flavor-Detection Technologies for Modeling Aroma of Hops , Yutong Liu

Pre-Milling Interventions for Improving the Microbiological Quality of Wheat , Shpresa Musa

NOVEL SOURCES OF FOOD ALLERGENS , Lee Palmer

Process Interventions for Improving the Microbiological Safety of Low Moisture Food Ingredients , Tushar Verma

Microbial Challenge Studies of Radio Frequency Heating for Dairy Powders and Gaseous Technologies for Spices , Xinyao Wei

The Molecular Basis for Natural Competence in Acinetobacter , Yafan Yu

Using Bioinformatics Tools to Evaluate Potential Risks of Food Allergy and to Predict Microbiome Functionality , Mohamed Abdelmoteleb

CONSUMER ATTITUDES, KNOWLEDGE, AND BEHAVIOR: UNDERSTANDING GLUTEN AVOIDANCE AND POINT-OF-DECISION PROMPTS TO INCREASE FIBER CONSUMPTION , Kristina Arslain

EVALUATING THE EFFECT OF NON-THERMAL PROCESSING AND ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS IN MODULATING THE ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY OF NEBRASKAN GREAT NORTHERN BEANS , Madhurima Bandyopadhyay

DETECTION OF FOOD PROTEINS IN HUMAN SERUM USING MASS SPECTROMETRY METHODS , Abigail S. Burrows

ASSESSING THE QUANTIFICATION OF SOY PROTEIN IN INCURRED MATRICES USING TARGETED LC-MS/MS , Jenna Krager

RESEARCH TOOLS AND THEIR USES FOR DETERMINING THE THERMAL INACTIVATION KINETICS OF SALMONELLA IN LOW-MOISTURE FOODS , Soon Kiat Lau

Investigating Microbial and Host Factors that Modulate Severity of Clostridioides difficile Associated Disease , Armando Lerma

Assessment of Grain Safety in Developing Nations , Jose R. Mendoza

EVALUATION OF LISTERIA INNOCUA TRANSFER FROM PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE) TO THE PLANT ENVIRONMENT AND EFFECTIVE SANITATION PROCEDURES TO CONTROL IT IN DAIRY PROCESSING FACILITIES , Karen Nieto

Development of a Sandwich ELISA Targeting Cashew Ana o 2 and Ana o 3 , Morganne Schmidt

Identification, aggressiveness and mycotoxin production of Fusarium graminearum and F. boothii isolates causing Fusarium head blight of wheat in Nebraska , Esteban Valverde-Bogantes

HIGH PRESSURE THAWING OF RAW POULTRY MEATS , Ali Alqaraghuli

Characterization and Evaluation of the Probiotic Properties of the Sporeforming Bacteria, Bacillus coagulans Unique IS-2 , Amy Garrison

Formation of Low Density and Free-Flowing Hollow Microparticles from Non-Hydrogenated Oils and Preparation of Pastries with Shortening Fat Composed of the Microparticles , Joshua Gudeman

Evaluating the Efficacy of Whole Cooked Enriched Egg in Modulating Health-Beneficial Biological Activities , Emerson Nolasco

Effect of Processing on Microbiota Accessible Carbohydrates in Whole Grains , Caroline Smith

ENCAPSULATION OF ASTAXANTHIN-ENRICHED CAMELINA SEED OIL OBTAINED BY ETHANOL-MODIFIED SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE EXTRACTION , Liyang Xie

Energy and Water Assessment and Plausibility of Reuse of Spent Caustic Solution in a Midwest Fluid Milk Processing Plant , Carly Rain Adams

Effect of Gallic and Ferulic Acids on Oxidative Phosphorylation on Candida albicans (A72 and SC5314) During the Yeast-to-Hyphae Transition , REHAB ALDAHASH

ABILITY OF PHENOLICS IN ISOLATION, COMPONENTS PRESENT IN SUPINA TURF GRASS TO REMEDIATE CANDIDA ALBICANS (A72 and SC5314) ADHESION AND BIOFILM FORMATION , Fatima Alessa

EFFECT OF PROCESSING ON IN-VITRO PROTEIN DIGESTIBILITY AND OTHER NUTRITIONAL ASPECTS OF NEBRASKA CROPS , Paridhi Gulati

Studies On The Physicochemical Characterization Of Flours And Protein Hydrolysates From Common Beans , Hollman Andres Motta Romero

Implementation of ISO/IEC Practices in Small and Academic Laboratories , Eric Layne Oliver

Enzymatic Activities and Compostional Properties of Whole Wheat Flour , Rachana Poudel

A Risk-Based Approach to Evaluate the Impact of Interventions at Reducing the Risk of Foodborne Illness Associated with Wheat-Based Products , Luis Sabillon

Thermal Inactivation Kinetics of Salmonella enterica and Enterococcus faecium in Ground Black Pepper , Sabrina Vasquez

Energy-Water Reduction and Wastewater Reclamation in a Fluid Milk Processing Facility , CarlyRain Adams, Yulie E. Meneses, Bing Wang, and Curtis Weller

Modeling the Survival of Salmonella in Soy Sauce-Based Products Stored at Two Different Temperatures , Ana Cristina Arciniega Castillo

WHOLE GRAIN PROCESSING AND EFFECTS ON CARBOHYDRATE DIGESTION AND FERMENTATION , Sandrayee Brahma

Promoting Gastrointestinal Health and Decreasing Inflammation with Whole Grains in Comparison to Fruit and Vegetables through Clinical Interventions and in vitro Tests , Julianne Kopf

Development of a Rapid Detection and Quantification Method for Yeasts and Molds in Dairy Products , Brandon Nguyen

Increasing Cis-lycopene Content of the Oleoresin from Tomato Processing Byproducts Using Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Assessment of Its Bioaccessibility , Lisbeth Vallecilla Yepez

Species and Trichothecene Genotypes of Fusarium Head Blight Pathogens in Nebraska, USA in 2015-2016 , Esteban Valverde-Bogantes

Validation of Extrusion Processing for the Safety of Low-Moisture Foods , Tushar Verma

Radiofrequency processing for inactivation of Salmonella spp. and Enterococcus faecium NRRL B-2354 in whole black peppercorn and ground black pepper , Xinyao Wei

CHARACTERIZATION OF EXTRACTION METHODS TO RECOVER PHENOLIC-RICH EXTRACTS FROM PINTO BEANS (BAJA) THAT INHIBIT ALPHA-AMYLASE AND ALPHA-GLUCOSIDASE USING RESPONSE SURFACE APPROACHES , Mohammed Alrugaibah

Matrix Effects on the Detection of Milk and Peanut Residues by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISA) , Abigail S. Burrows

Evaluation of Qualitative Food Allergen Detection Methods and Cleaning Validation Approaches , Rachel C. Courtney

Studies of Debaryomyces hansenii killer toxin and its effect on pathogenic bloodstream Candida isolates , Rhaisa A. Crespo Ramírez

Development of a Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) for Detection of Macadamia Nut Residues in Processed Food Products , Charlene Gan

FROM MILPAS TO THE MARKET: A STUDY ON THE USE OF METAL SILOS FOR SAFER AND BETTER STORAGE OF GUATEMALAN MAIZE , José Rodrigo Mendoza

Feasibility, safety, economic and environmental implications of whey-recovered water for cleaning-in place systems: A case study on water conservation for the dairy industry , Yulie E. Meneses-González

Studies on asparagine in Nebraska wheat and other grains , Sviatoslav Navrotskyi

Risk Assessment and Research Synthesis methodologies in food safety: two effective tools to provide scientific evidence into the Decision Making Process. , Juan E. Ortuzar

Edible Insects as a Source of Food Allergens , Lee Palmer

IMPROVING THE UTILIZATION OF DRY EDIBLE BEANS IN A READY-TO-EAT SNACK PRODUCT BY EXTRUSION COOKING , Franklin Sumargo

Formation of Bioactive-Carrier Hollow Solid Lipid Micro- and Nanoparticles , Junsi Yang

The Influence of the Bovine Fecal Microbiota on the Shedding of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli (STEC) by Beef Cattle , Nirosh D. Aluthge

Preference Mapping of Whole Grain and High Fiber Products: Whole Wheat Bread and Extruded Rice and Bean Snack , Ashley J. Bernstein

Comparative Study Of The D-values of Salmonella spp. and Enterococcus faecium in Wheat Flour , Didier Dodier

Simulation and Validation of Radio Frequency Heating of Shell Eggs , Soon Kiat Lau

Viability of Lactobacillus acidophilus DDS 1-10 Encapsulated with an Alginate-Starch Matrix , Liya Mo

Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Shiga Toxin Producing E. coli (STEC) Throughout Beef Summer Sausage Production and the use of High Pressure Processing as an Alternative Intervention to Thermal Processing , Eric L. Oliver

A Finite Element Method Based Microwave Heat Transfer Modeling of Frozen Multi-Component Foods , Krishnamoorthy Pitchai

Efficacy of Galactooliosaccharide (GOS) and/or Rhamnose-Based Synbiotics in Enhancing Ecological Performance of Lactobacillus reuteri in the Human Gut and Characterization of Its GOS Metabolic System , Monchaya Rattanaprasert

Corn Characterization and Development of a Convenient Laboratory Scale Alkaline Cooking Process , Shreya N. Sahasrabudhe

PHENOLIC RICH EXTRACTS OBTAINED FROM SMALL RED BEANS IN PREVENTING MACROPHAGE MEDIATED CHRONIC INFLAMMATION , Nidhi Sharma

Characterization and Investigation of Fungi Inhabiting the Gastrointestinal Tract of Healthy and Diseased Humans , Mallory J. Suhr

Effects of blanching on color, texture and sodium chloride content during storage time of frozen vegetable soybean modeling for commercial scale , Pimsiree Suwan

Influence of Native and Processed Cereal Grain Fibers on Gut Health , Junyi Yang

CHARACTERIZATION OF EXTRACTION METHODS TO RECOVER PHENOLIC RICH EXTRACTS FROM PINTO BEANS THAT EXERT HIGH ANTIOXIDATIVE ACTIVITIES USING RESPONSE SURFACE APPROACH , Mohammed Aldawsari

Improving the Health Impacts of Whole Grains through Processing: Resistant Starch, Dietary Fiber Solubility, and Mineral Bioaccessibility , Jennifer A. Arcila Castillo

DEBARYOMYCES HANSENII : A FOODBORNE YEAST THAT PRODUCES ANTI- CANDIDA KILLER TOXIN , Nabaraj Banjara

Characterization of Commercial Probiotics: Antibiotic Resistance, Acid and Bile Resistance, and Prebiotic Utilization , Carmen Lucia Cano Roca

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Texas A&M University Catalogs

Doctor of philosophy in food science and technology.

Graduate degrees in Food Science and Technology are administered by the Graduate Faculty of Food Science within the Department of Food Science and Technology in accordance with all relevant policies and procedures of Texas A&M University. 

The Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degree is offered and may be obtained through an appropriate course of study, completion of research or other requirements, successful completion of university-directed administrative procedures, and successful defense of the dissertation. Students may pursue fundamental and/or translational (i.e. applied) research in the areas of food chemistry, products processing, food microbiology and safety including probiotic microbiology, engineering and rheology, food packaging, ingredients technology, meat or poultry science, cereals science and processing, plant bioactives, sensory analysis, etc. A process of research or study will be outlined by the student with guidance from the student’s graduate advisory committee membership.

Steps to Fulfill a Doctoral Program

Program Requirements

  • Student's Advisory Committee

Degree Plan

Transfer of credit, research proposal.

  • Preliminary Examination

Preliminary Examination Format

Preliminary examination scheduling, report of preliminary examination, failure of the preliminary examination, retake of failed preliminary examination.

  • Final Examination

Report of Final Examination

Dissertation, student’s advisory committee.

After receiving admission to graduate studies and enrolling, the student will consult with the head of his or her major or administrative department (or chair of the intercollegiate faculty) concerning appointment of the chair of the advisory committee. The student’s advisory committee will consist of  no fewer than four members of the graduate faculty  representative of the student’s several fields of study and research, where the chair or co-chair must be from the student’s department (or intercollegiate faculty, if applicable), and  at least one or more of the members must have an appointment to a department other than the student’s major department . The outside member for a student in an interdisciplinary degree program must be from a department different from the chair of the student’s committee.

The chair, in consultation with the student, will select the remainder of the advisory committee. Only graduate faculty members located on Texas A&M University campuses may serve as chair of a student’s advisory committee. Other Texas A&M University graduate faculty members located off-campus may serve as a member or co-chair (but not chair), with a member as the chair.

If the chair of a student’s advisory committee voluntarily leaves the University and the student is near completion of the degree and wants the chair to continue to serve in this role, the student is responsible for securing a current member of the University Graduate Faculty, from the student’s academic program and located near the Texas A&M University campus site, to serve as the co-chair of the committee. The Department Head or Chair of Intercollegiate faculty may request in writing to the Associate Provost and Dean of the Graduate and Professional School that a faculty member who is on an approved leave of absence or has voluntarily separated from the university, be allowed to continue to serve in the role of chair of a student’s advisory committee without a co-chair for up to one year. The students should be near completion of the degree. Extensions beyond the one year period can be granted with additional approval of the Dean.

The committee members’ signatures on the degree plan indicate their willingness to accept the responsibility for guiding and directing the entire academic program of the student and for initiating all academic actions concerning the student. Although individual committee members may be replaced by petition for valid reasons, a committee cannot resign  en masse . The chair of the committee, who usually has immediate supervision of the student’s research and dissertation or record of study, has the responsibility for calling all meetings of the committee. The duties of the committee include responsibility for the proposed degree plan, the research proposal, the preliminary examination, the dissertation or record of study and the final examination. In addition, the committee, as a group and as individual members, is responsible for counseling the student on academic matters, and, in the case of academic deficiency, initiating recommendations to the Graduate and Professional School.

The student’s advisory committee will evaluate the student’s previous education and degree objectives. The committee, in consultation with the student, will develop a proposed degree plan and outline a research problem which, when completed, as indicated by the dissertation (or its equivalent for the degree of Doctor of Education or the degree of Doctor of Engineering), will constitute the basic requirements for the degree. The degree plan must be filed with the Graduate and Professional School prior to the deadline imposed by the student’s college and no later than 90 days prior to the preliminary examination.

This proposed degree plan should be submitted through the online Document Processing Submission System located on the website  http://ogsdpss.tamu.edu . A minimum of 64 hours is required on the degree plan for the Doctor of Philosophy for a student who has completed a master’s degree. A student who has completed a DDS/DMD, DVM or a MD at a U.S. institution is also required to complete a minimum of 64 hours. A student who has completed a baccalaureate degree but not a master’s degree will be required to complete a 96-hour degree plan. Completion of a DDS/DMD, DVM or MD degree at a foreign institution requires completion of a minimum of 96 hours for the Doctor of Philosophy. A field of study may be primarily in one department or in a combination of departments. A degree plan must carry a reasonable amount of 691 (research). A maximum of 9 hours of 400-level undergraduate courses may be used toward meeting credit-hour requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy.

Additional coursework may be added by petition to the approved degree plan by the student’s advisory committee if it is deemed necessary to correct deficiencies in the student’s academic preparation. No changes can be made to the degree plan once the student’s Request for Final Examination is approved by the Graduate and Professional School.

Approval to enroll in any professional course (900-level) should be obtained from the head of the department (or Chair of the intercollegiate faculty, if applicable) in which the course will be offered before including such a course on a degree plan.

No credit may be obtained by correspondence study, by extension or for any course of fewer than three weeks duration.

For non-distance degree programs, no more than four courses may be taken by distance education without approval of the Graduate and Professional School and no more than 50 percent of the non-research credit hours required for the program may be completed through distance education courses.

To receive a graduate degree from Texas A&M University, students must earn one-third or more of the credits through the institution’s own direct instruction. This limitation also applies to joint degree programs. 

Courses for which transfer credits are sought must have been completed with a grade of B or greater and must be approved by the student’s advisory committee and the Graduate and Professional School. These courses must not have been used previously for another degree. Except for officially approved cooperative doctoral programs, credit for thesis or dissertation research or the equivalent is not transferable. Credit for “internship” coursework in any form is not transferable. Courses taken in residence at an accredited U.S. institution or approved international institution with a final grade of B or greater will be considered for transfer credit if, at the time the courses were completed, the courses would be accepted for credit toward a similar degree for a student in degree-seeking status at the host institution. Credit for coursework taken by extension is not transferable. Coursework  in which no formal grades are given or in which grades other than letter grades (A or B) are earned (for example, CR, P, S, U, H, etc.) is not accepted for transfer credit . Credit for coursework submitted for transfer from any college or university must be shown in semester credit hours, or equated to semester credit hours.

Courses used toward a degree at another institution may not be applied for graduate credit. If the course to be transferred was taken prior to the conferral of a degree at the transfer institution, a letter from the registrar at that institution stating that the course was not applied for credit toward the degree must be submitted to the Graduate and Professional School.

Grades for courses completed at other institutions are not included in computing the GPA. An official transcript from the university at which transfer courses are taken must be sent directly to the Office of Admissions.

The general field of research to be used for the dissertation should be agreed on by the student and the advisory committee at their first meeting, as a basis for selecting the proper courses to support the proposed research.

As soon thereafter as the research project can be outlined in reasonable detail, the dissertation research proposal should be completed. The research proposal should be approved at a meeting of the student’s advisory committee, at which time the feasibility of the proposed research and the adequacy of available facilities should be reviewed. The approved proposal, signed by all members of the student’s advisory committee, the head of the student’s major department (or chair of the intercollegiate faculty, if applicable), must be submitted to the Graduate and Professional School at least 20 working days prior to the submission of the Request for the Final Examination.

Compliance issues must be addressed if a graduate student is performing research involving human subjects, animals, infectious biohazards and recombinant DNA. A student involved in these types of research should check with the Office of Research Compliance and Biosafety at (979) 458-1467 to address questions about all research compliance responsibilities. Additional information can also be obtained on the website  http:// rcb.tamu.edu .

Examinations

Preliminary examination for doctoral students.

The student’s major department (or chair of the interdisciplinary degree program faculty, if applicable) and his or her advisory committee may require qualifying, cumulative or other types of examinations at any time deemed desirable. These examinations are entirely at the discretion of the department and the student’s advisory committee.

The preliminary examination is required. The preliminary examination for a doctoral student shall be given no earlier than a date at which the student is within 6 credit hours of completion of the formal coursework on the degree plan (i.e., all coursework on the degree plan except 681, 684, 690, 691, 692, 693, 695, 697, 791, or other graduate courses specifically designated as S/U in the course catalog). The student should complete the Preliminary Examination no later than the end of the semester following the completion of the formal coursework on the degree plan.

The objective of preliminary examination is to evaluate whether the student has demonstrated the following qualifications:

a.     a mastery of the subject matter of all fields in the program;

b.     an adequate knowledge of the literature in these fields and an ability to carry out bibliographical research;

c.     an understanding of the research problem and the appropriate methodological approaches.

The format of the preliminary examination shall be determined by the student’s department (or interdisciplinary degree program, if applicable) and advisory committee, and communicated to the student in advance of the examination. The exam may consist of a written component, oral component, or combination of written and oral components.

The preliminary exam may be administered by the advisory committee or a departmental committee; herein referred to as the examination committee.

Regardless of exam format, a student will receive an overall preliminary exam result of pass or fail. The department (or interdisciplinary degree program, if applicable) will determine how the overall pass or fail result is determined based on the exam structure and internal department procedures. If the exam is administered by the advisory committee, each advisory committee member will provide a pass or fail evaluation decision.

Only one advisory committee substitution is allowed to provide an evaluation decision for a student’s preliminary exam, and it cannot be the committee chair.

If a student is required to take, as a part of the preliminary examination, a written component administered by a department or interdisciplinary degree program, the department or interdisciplinary degree program faculty must:

a.     offer the examination at least once every six months. The departmental or interdisciplinary degree program examination should be announced at least 30 days prior to the scheduled examination date.

b.     assume the responsibility for marking the examination satisfactory or unsatisfactory, or otherwise graded, and in the case of unsatisfactory, stating specifically the reasons for such a mark.

c.     forward the marked examination to the chair of the student’s advisory committee within one week after the examination.

Prior to commencing any component of the preliminary examination, a departmental representative or the advisory committee chair will review the eligibility criteria with the student, using the Preliminary Examination Checklist to ensure the student is eligible for the preliminary examination. The following list of eligibility requirements applies.

Student is registered at Texas A&M University for a minimum of one semester credit hour in the long semester or summer term during which any component of the preliminary examination is held. If the entire examination is held between semesters, then the student must be registered for the term immediately preceding the examination.

An approved degree plan is on file with the Graduate and Professional School prior to commencing the first component of the examination.

Student’s cumulative GPA is at least 3.000.

Student’s degree plan GPA is at least 3.000.

At the end of the semester in which at least the first component of the exam is given, there are no more than 6 hours of coursework remaining on the degree plan (except 681, 684, 690, 691, 692, 693, 695, 697, 791, or other graduate courses specifically designated as S/U in the course catalog). The head of the student’s department (or Chair of the Interdisciplinary Degree Program, if applicable) has the authority to approve a waiver of this criterion.

Credit for the preliminary examination is not transferable in cases where a student changes degree programs after passing a preliminary exam.

If a written component precedes an oral component of the preliminary exam, the chair of the student’s examination committee is responsible for making all written examinations available to all members of the committee. A positive evaluation of the preliminary exam by all members of a student’s examination committee with at most one dissension is required to pass a student on his or her preliminary exam.

The student’s department will promptly report the results of the Preliminary Examination to the Graduate and Professional School via the Report of Doctoral Preliminary Examination form. The Preliminary Examination checklist form must also be submitted. These forms should be submitted to the Graduate and Professional School within 10 working days of completion of the preliminary examination.

The Report of the Preliminary Examination form must be submitted with original signatures of the approved examination committee members. If an approved examination committee member substitution (one only) has been made, that signature must also be included, in place of the committee member, on the form submitted to the Graduate and Professional School. The original signature of the department head is also required on the form.

After passing the required preliminary oral and written examinations for a doctoral degree, the student must complete the final examination within four years of the semester in which the preliminary exam is taken. Exams taken in between terms will expire at the end of the term that ended prior to the exam. For example, a preliminary exam taken and passed during the fall 2019 semester will expire at the end of the fall 2023 semester. A preliminary exam taken in the time between the summer and fall 2019 semesters will expire at the end of the summer 2023 semester.

First Failure

Upon approval of a student’s examination committee (with no more than one member dissenting), and approval of the Department and Graduate and Professional School, a student who has failed a preliminary examination may be given one re-examination. In accordance with Student Rule 12.5, the student’s department head or designee, intercollegiate faculty, or graduate advisory committee should make a recommendation to the student regarding their scholastic deficiency.

Second Failure

Upon failing the preliminary exam twice in a doctoral program, a student is no longer eligible to continue to pursue the PhD in that program/major. In accordance with Student Rule 12.5.3 and/or 12.5.4, the student will be notified of the action being taken by the department as a result of the second failure of the preliminary examination.

Adequate time must be given to permit a student to address inadequacies emerging from the first preliminary examination. The examination committee must agree upon and communicate to the student, in writing, an adequate time-frame from the first examination (normally six months) to retest, as well as a detailed explanation of the inadequacies emerging from the examination. The student and committee should jointly negotiate a mutually acceptable date for this retest.  When providing feedback on inadequacies, the committee should clearly document expected improvements that the student must be able to exhibit in order to retake the exam.  The examination committee will document and communicate the time-frame and feedback within 10 working days of the exam that was not passed.

Final Examination for Doctoral Students

The candidate for the doctoral degree must pass a final examination by deadline dates announced in the “Graduate and Professional School Calendar” each semester. The doctoral student is allowed only one opportunity to take the final examination.

No unabsolved grades of D, F, or U for any course can be listed on the degree plan. The student must be registered for any remaining hours of 681, 684, 690, 691, 692, 791 or other graduate courses specifically designated as S/U in the course catalog during the semester of the final exam. No student may be given a final examination until they have been admitted to candidacy and their current official cumulative and degree plan GPAs are 3.00 or better.

To be admitted to candidacy for a doctoral degree, a student must have:

1.       completed all formal coursework on the degree plan with the exception of any remaining 681, 684, 690 and 691, 692 (Professional Study), or 791 hours,

2.       a 3.0 Graduate GPA and a Degree Plan GPA of at least 3.0 with no grade lower than C in any course on the degree plan,

3.       passed the preliminary examination,

4.       submitted an approved dissertation proposal,

5.       met the residence requirements.

The request to hold and announce the final examination must be submitted to the Graduate and Professional School a minimum of 10 working days in advance of the scheduled date. Any changes to the degree plan must be approved by the Graduate and Professional School prior to the submission of the request for final examination.

 The student’s advisory committee will conduct this examination. The final examination is not to be administered until the dissertation or record of study is available in substantially final form to the student’s advisory committee, and all concerned have had adequate time to review the document.  Whereas the final examination may cover the broad field of the candidate’s training, it is presumed that the major portion of the time will be devoted to the dissertation and closely allied topics. Persons other than members of the graduate faculty may, with mutual consent of the candidate and the chair of the advisory committee, be invited to attend a final examination for an advanced degree. A positive vote by all members of the graduate committee with at most one dissension is required to pass a student on his or her exam. A department can have a stricter requirement provided there is consistency within all degree programs within a department. Upon completion of the questioning of the candidate, all visitors must excuse themselves from the proceedings.

The student’s department will promptly report the results of the Final Examination to the Graduate and Professional School via the Report of Doctoral Final Examination form. These forms should be submitted to the Graduate and Professional School within 10 working days of completion of the final examination. The Graduate and Professional School must be notified in writing of any cancellations.

A positive evaluation of the final exam by all members of a student’s advisory committee with at most one dissension is required to pass a student on his or her final exam. The Report of the Final Examination Form must be submitted with original signatures of only the committee members approved by the Graduate and Professional School. If necessary, multiple copies of the form may be submitted with different committee member original signatures. If an approved committee member substitution (1 only) has been made, his/her signature must be included on the form submitted to the Graduate and Professional School.

The ability to perform independent research must be demonstrated by the dissertation,  which must be the original work of the candidate . Whereas acceptance of the dissertation is based primarily on its scholarly merit, it must also exhibit creditable literary workmanship. The format of the dissertation must be acceptable to the Graduate and Professional School. Guidelines for the preparation of the dissertation are available in the  Thesis Manual , which is available online at  https://grad.tamu.edu .

After successful defense and approval by the student’s advisory committee and the head of the student’s major department (or chair of the intercollegiate faculty, if applicable), a student must submit his/her dissertation in electronic format as a single PDF file. The PDF file must be uploaded to the website,  https://grad.tamu.edu . Additionally, a signed paper approval form with original signatures must be received by the Graduate and Professional School. Both the PDF file and the signed approval form are required by the deadline.

Deadline dates for submitting are announced each semester or summer term in the Graduate and Professional School Calendar (see Time Limit statement). These dates also can be accessed via the website  https://grad.tamu.edu .

Each student who submits a document for review is assessed a one-time thesis/dissertation processing fee through Student Business Services. This processing fee is for the thesis/dissertation services provided. After commencement, dissertations are digitally stored and made available through the Texas A&M Libraries.

A dissertation that is deemed unacceptable by the Graduate and Professional School because of excessive corrections will be returned to the student’s department head or chair of the intercollegiate faculty . The manuscript must be resubmitted as a new document, and the entire review process must begin anew. All original submittal deadlines must be met during the resubmittal process in order to graduate.

Additional Requirements

Continuous registration, admission to candidacy.

  • 99-Hour Cap on Doctoral Degree

Application for Degree

A student who enters the doctoral degree program with a baccalaureate degree must spend one academic year plus one semester in resident study at Texas A&M University. A student who holds master’s degree when he/she enters doctoral degree program must spend one academic year in resident study. One academic year may include two adjacent regular semesters or one regular semester and one adjacent 10-week summer semester. The third semester is not required to be adjacent to the one year. Enrollment for each semester must be a minimum of 9 credit hours each to satisfy the residence requirement. A minimum of 1 credit hour must be in a non-distance education delivery mode. Semesters in which the student is enrolled in all distance education coursework will not count toward fulfillment of the residence requirement.

To satisfy the residence requirement, the student must complete a minimum of 9 credit hours per semester or 10-week summer semester in resident study at Texas A&M University for the required period. A student who enters a doctoral degree program with a baccalaureate degree may fulfill residence requirements in excess of one academic year (18 credit hours) by registration during summer sessions or by completion of a less-than-full course load (in this context a full course load is considered 9 credit hours per semester).

Students who are employed full-time while completing their degree may fulfill total residence requirements by completion of less-than-full time course loads each semester. In order to be considered for this, the student is required to submit a Petition for Waivers and Exceptions along with verification of his/her employment to the Graduate and Professional School. An employee should submit verification of his/her employment at the time he/she submits the degree plan. See  Registration.

See  Residence Requirements .

All requirements for doctoral degrees must be completed within a period of ten consecutive calendar years for the degree to be granted. A course will be considered valid until 10 years after the end of the semester in which it is taken. Graduate credit for coursework more than ten calendar years old at the time of the final oral examination may not be used to satisfy degree requirements.

A final corrected version of the dissertation or record of study in electronic format as a single PDF file must be cleared by the Graduate and Professional School within one year of the semester in which the final exam is taken. Exams taken in between terms will expire at the end of the term that ended prior to the exam. For example, a final exam taken and passed during the fall 2022 semester will expire at the end of the fall 2023 semester. A final exam taken in the time between the summer and fall 2022 semesters will expire at the end of the summer 2023 semester. Failure to do so will result in the degree not being awarded.

A student in a program leading to a Doctor of Philosophy who has completed all coursework on his/her degree plan other than 691 (research) are required to be in continuous registration until all requirements for the degree have been completed. See  Continuous Registration Requirements .

  • completed all formal coursework on the degree plan with the exception of any remaining 681, 684, 690 and 691, or 791.
  • a 3.0 Graduate GPA and a Degree Plan GPA of at least 3.0 with no grade lower than C in any course on the degree plan,
  • passed the preliminary examination (written and oral portions),
  • submitted an approved dissertation proposal,
  • met the residence requirements. The final examination will not be authorized for any doctoral student who has not been admitted to candidacy.

A student is required to possess a competent command of English. For English language proficiency requirements, see the Admissions section of this catalog. The doctoral (PhD) foreign language requirement at Texas A&M University is a departmental option, to be administered and monitored by the individual departments of academic instruction.

99-Hour Cap on Doctoral Degrees

In Texas, public colleges and universities are funded by the state according to the number of students enrolled. In accordance with legislation passed by the Texas Legislature, the number of hours for which state universities may receive subvention funding at the doctoral rate for any individual is limited to 99 hours. Texas A&M and other universities will not receive subvention for hours in excess of the limit.

Institutions of higher education are allowed to charge the equivalent of non-resident tuition to a resident doctoral student who has enrolled in 100 or more semester credit hours of doctoral coursework.

Doctoral students at Texas A&M have seven years to complete their degree before being charged out-of-state tuition. A doctoral student who, after seven years of study, has accumulated 100 or more doctoral hours will be charged tuition at a rate equivalent to out-of-state tuition. Please note that the tuition increases will apply to Texas residents as well as students from other states and countries who are currently charged tuition at the resident rate. This includes those doctoral students who hold GAT, GANT, and GAR appointments or recipients of competitive fellowships who receive more than $1,000 per semester. Doctoral students who have not accumulated 100 hours after seven years of study are eligible to pay in-state tuition if otherwise eligible.

Doctoral students who exceed the credit limit will receive notification from the Graduate and Professional School during the semester in which they are enrolled and exceeding the limit in their current degree program. The notification will explain that the State of Texas does not provide funding for any additional hours in which a student is enrolled in excess of 99 hours. Texas A&M University will recover the lost funds by requiring students in excess of 99 hours to pay tuition at the non-funded, non-resident rate. This non-funded, non-resident tuition rate status will be updated for the following semester and in all subsequent semesters until receipt of a doctoral degree. Please see the  Tuition Calculator  at the non-resident rate for an example of potential charges.

The following majors are exempt from the 99-Hour Cap on Doctoral Degrees and have a limit of 130 doctoral hours:

  • Biochemistry
  • Biomedical Sciences
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Counseling Psychology
  • Genetics and Genomics
  • Health Services Research
  • Medical Sciences
  • Microbiology
  • Neurosciences (School of Medicine)
  • Oral and Craniofacial Biomedical Sciences
  • Pharmaceutical Sciences
  • Public Health Sciences
  • School Psychology

For information on applying for your degree, please visit the  Graduation  section.

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Home > CNS > FOODSCI > FOODSCI_THESES

Food Science Department Masters Theses Collection

Theses from 2023 2023.

Sucrose Concentration and Fermentation Temperature Impact the Sensory Characteristics and Liking of Kombucha , Gil Cohen, Food Science

Nutrient Density, Added Sugar, and Fiber Contents of Commercially Available Fruit Snacks in the United States from 2017 to 2022 , Hao Fu, Food Science

IMPACT OF FERMENTED AND NON-FERMENTED PLANT-BASED FOODS SUPPLEMENTATION ON GUT MICROBIOTA AND METABOLITES IN C57BL/6J MICE , Priya Darshan Gandhi, Food Science

EVALUATING THE POTENTIAL OF OZONE MICROBUBBLES FOR INACTIVATION OF TULANE VIRUS, A HUMAN NOROVIRUS SURROGATE , bozhong guan, Food Science

Impact of Animal Protein and Plant Protein on the Gut Microbiota and Metabolites of C57BL/6J Mice , Levina Soetyono, Food Science

Fat Lowering Effects of Piperine in Caenorhabditis elegans , Zhoutai Teng, Food Science

Optimization of Optical Properties of Plant-Based Foods , Donpon Wannasin, Food Science

Theses from 2022 2022

Foaming Properties of Dilute Pea Protein Solutions , Jiani Bao, Food Science

Analysis of Plant and Animal Proteins Using Raman Spectroscopy , Noopur Bapardekar, Food Science

Detection of Benzoyl Peroxide in Flour Using Raman Spectroscopy , Yu Ho, Food Science

Analysis of Inorganic Arsenic In Food Using X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Spectroscopy , Helen Lin, Food Science

Theses from 2021 2021

Antioxidant Combination of High Phosphatidylserine (PS) Lecithin with Mixed Tocopherol in Soybean Oil-in-Water Emulsion: Effect of pH and Salt , Princy Agnihotri, Food Science

Antioxidant Synergism Between α-Tocopherol And a High Phosphatidylserine Modified Lecithin , Harshika Arora, Food Science

Factors Affecting Sensory Acceptance of Thickened Liquids Used in Dysphagia Management , Allison N. Cox, Food Science

Bioactive Extracts of the Brown Seaweed Laminaria Japonica to Improve Gut Health , Yifan Gao, Food Science

Fat Lowering Effects of Fisetin in Caenorhabditis elegans , Nikolas J. Rodriguez, Food Science

Theses from 2020 2020

Frying Oil and Frying Oil-Derived Polar Compounds Exaggerate Colitis in Mice , Xijing Chen, Food Science

DEVELOPMENT OF HEADSPACE ANALYSIS OF LIVING AND POSTHARVEST FRESH PRODUCE USING SURFACE-ENHANCED RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY (SERS) , Xinyi Du, Food Science

UTILIZATION OF EMULSION CHEMISTRIES FOR DELIVERY AND ANTIVIRAL APPLICATION OF CARVACROL , Hao-yuan Hsu, Food Science

Effect of Jackfruit-Derived Extract Consumption on Colitis-Associated Colon Tumorigenesis in Mice , Jingwen Lin, Food Science

The Comparison of Functional and Physical Properties of Commercial Pulse Proteins to Soy Protein , Kai Kai Ma, Food Science

Effects of Berberine on Development in Caenorhabditis elegans , Zhuojia Qian, Food Science

Dietary Oligosaccharides Modulate Bifidobacterial Production of the Neurotransmitter Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid , Michelle Rozycki, Food Science

ANTI-INFLAMMATORY EFFECT OF RED SEAWEED EXTRACTS , Yingying Yang, Food Science

Green Coffee Bean Extract Reduces Fat Accumulation in Drosophila melanogaster , Lynnea Young, Food Science

Theses from 2019 2019

Influence Of Shipping Container Upon Temperature, Relative Humidity, And Bacterial Growth On Broccoli , Nicholas Berus, Food Science

Optical Meets Mechanical: Use of Luminescence Spectroscopy To Assess Ageing in Biodegradable Films , Louis Colaruotolo, Food Science

The Efficacy of ATP Monitoring Devices at Measuring Organic Matter on Postharvest Surfaces , Kristin Lane, Food Science

Application of Flow Cytometry as Novel Technology in Studying Lipid Oxidation in Oil-in-Water Emulsions , Peilong Li, Food Science

Deltamethrin Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Increases Proteotoxicity in Caenorhabditis Elegans , Yuejia Xu, Food Science

Effect of frying oil consumption on colon tumorigenesis in mice , Ran Yang, Food Science

Click Chemistry Approach to Analyze Curcumin-Protein Interactions in vitro and in vivo , Jingyi Zhou, Food Science

Theses from 2018 2018

Development and Application of A SERS Needle for One-step Multi-phase Analysis , Haoxin Chen, Food Science

Adding Increased Value to Strawberry Puree by Adding Xylo-oligosaccharides to Improve Health , Haochen Dai, Food Science

Reactive Carbonyl Compounds: Their Control and Consequences in Foods , Michael Freund, Food Science

Optimization of Peracetic Acid as an Antimicrobial Agent in Postharvest Processing Wash Water , Tiah Ghostlaw, Food Science

Effects of Solid Fat Content, Synthetic Antioxidants and Headspace Oxygen Reduction on the Rates of Oxidation in Surface and Total Lipids of Crackers , Collin Alexander Hayes, Food Science

Use of alamarBlue as an Indicator of Microbial Growth in Turbid Solutions for Antimicrobial Evaluation , Precious Henshaw, Food Science

Designing Antimicrobial Polymer Coating to Inhibit Pathogenic and Spoilage Microorganisms , Anne Yu-Ting Hung, Food Science

Screening of Commercially Available Chlorine Based Sanitizers and their Efficacy in Reducing Microbial Load Levels of E. coli O157:H7 at High and Low Organic Load Environments , Paola Martinez-Ramos, Food Science

Extractable And Non-Extractable Polyphenols From Mango , Yuchao Ma, Food Science

Caenorhabditis Elegans Model To Study Antimicrobial Treatment On E. coli O157:H7 , Parita Patel, Food Science

Tocopherol regeneration by phospholipids in soybean oil-in-water emulsions: effect of tocopherol homologue and emulsifier type , Gautam Samdani, Food Science

Utilization of Modified Lecithin to Control Lipid Oxidation in Bulk Oils , Anuj Shanbhag, Food Science

Biological Effects and Action Mechanisms of Dietary Compounds , Elvira Sukamtoh, Food Science

Understanding the Thermal Stability and Environmental Sensitivity of Phycocyanin using Spectroscopic and Modelling Tools , Cally Toong, Food Science

Development of Methodology for Rapid Bacterial Detection in Complex Matrices Using SERS , Madeline Tucker, Food Science

Theses from 2017 2017

Investigating Natural and Induced Biofilm Dispersion in Listeria monocytogenes , Brett Boulden, Food Science

Influence of Biomimetic Chelating Packaging on Natural Antimicrobial Efficacy , Paul Castrale, Food Science

Extractable and Non-Extractable Polyphenols from Apples: Potential Anti-inflammatory Agents , MaKenzi Gennette, Food Science

Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Reduces Fat Accumulation in Caenorhabditis Elegans , Jinning Liu, Food Science

SODIUM REDUCTION IN TURKEY BREAST MEAT BY USING SODIUM ANION SPECIES , Janamkumar Pandya, Food Science

Development of a SERS Sandwich Assay Platform for Rapid Detection of Bacteria , Brooke Pearson, Food Science

Use Of Different Ripening Inhibitors To Enhance Antimicrobial Activity Of Essential Oil Nanoemulsion , Victor Ryu, Food Science

Methylglyoxal Influences Development of Caenorhabditis Elegans via Heterochronic Pathway , Jiaying Wang, Food Science

Investigating the Utilization of Mushrooms in Beef-Based Products for Improved Health , Kristin Wong, Food Science

Theses from 2016 2016

Influence of Hierarchical Interfacial Assembly on Lipase Stability and Performance in Deep Eutectic Solvent , Stephanie M. Andler, Food Science

Chemical Stability of Curcumin: Structure and Activity Relationship (SAR) Study , Zheyuan Du, Food Science

Development of Filter-Based Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopic Assays for Rapid Detection of Chemical and Biological Contaminants in Water , Siyue Gao, Food Science

Deltamethrin, a Pyrethroid Insecticide, Potentiates Lipid Accumulation in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes , Tsung-Hsiu Hsieh, Food Science

Distribution of Enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens Spores in U.S. Retail Spices , Chi-An Lee, Food Science

Influence of Inoculum Preparation upon Sensitivity of Common Food Borne Pathogens to Emulsion Based Antimicrobials , Dillon SD Murray, Food Science

Utilizing Nutritive Sweeteners to Control Lipid Oxidation in Low Moisture Baked Goods , Samantha Vieira, Food Science

Fish Oil Nanoemulsions: Optimization of Physical and Chemical Stability for Food System Applications , Rebecca M. Walker, Food Science

Enzymatic Digestion Improved Bacteria Separation from Leafy Green Vegetables , Danhui Wang, Food Science

Echerichia coli Biofilm Formation in Musca domestica Crops , Lufan Wang, Food Science

Encapsulation of Probiotic Microorganisms in Food-Grade Hydrogel Microbeads for Improving Long-Term Storage and Oral Delivery , Timothy W. Yeung, Food Science

INVESTIGATE THE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN SILVER NANOPARTICLES AND SPINACH LEAF BY SURFACE ENHANCED RAMAN SPECTROSCOPIC MAPPING , Zhiyun Zhang, Food Science

Curcumin and Its Oxidative Degradation Products: Their Comparative Effects on Inflammation , Julia Zhu, Food Science

Theses from 2015 2015

Development of Nanoemulsion-based Delivery Systems for Evaluation of Triglycerides Bioactivity in Caernohabditis Elegans , Jose D. Colmenares, Food Science

Spray Fabrication of Layer-by-Layer Antimicrobial N-Halamine Coatings , Anna Denis-Rohr, Food Science

Eneterotoxigenic Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis Spores in U.S. retail Spices , Upasana Hariram, Food Science

Application of Bacteriophage Cocktail in Leafy Green Wash Water to Control Salmonella Enterica , Andrea W. Lo, Food Science

Theses from 2014 2014

Modification of Gold Nanoparticles for SERS Application in Emulsion and Lipid Systems , Michael J. Driver, Food Science

Influence of Physical States (Crystalized Versus Solubilized) of Bioactive Components And Oil Composition on Bioaccessibility And Bioavailability , Ziyuan Xia, Food Science

Theses from 2013 2013

Combinational Effects of Polymethoxyflavones and Atorvastatin in Inhibiting Human Breast Cancer Cells , Longfang Li, Food Science

Use of Β-Cyclodextrin and Activated Carbon for Quantification of Salmonella Enterica Ser. Enteritidis from Ground Beef by Conventional Pcr , Nathan J. Opet, Food Science

Improvement of Functional Bioactivity in Pear:Blackberry Synergies with Lactic Acid Fermentation for Type 2 Diabetes and Hypertension Management , Nicholas W. Pucel, Food Science

Theses from 2012 2012

Synergistic Approach for Designing and Enhancing Bioactive Ingredients from Apple and Blueberry for the Management of Early Stages of Type 2 Diabetes , Widya Agustinah, Food Science

Development of a Novel Lateral-Flow Assay to Detect Yeast Nucleic Acid Sequences , Catherine E. Fill, Food Science

Purification and Characterization of Novel Nucleases from a Thermophilic Fungus , Kyle S. Landry, Food Science

The Effect Of Curcumin (Curcuma Longa) On Biofilm Formation And Surface Proteins Of Listeria Monocytogenes , Songsirin Ruengvisesh, Food Science

Accessing The Bioavailability Of Phytochemicals In Caco-2 Cell Model And Developing A Sensitive Method For The Detection And Quantification Of These Compounds , Hana Shatara Sobers, Food Science

Evaluation of Blackberry Cultivars and Blackberry-Pear Synergies for Potential Management of Type Ii Diabetes and Hypertension , Stephen D. Warner, Food Science

Theses from 2011 2011

Antagonism of Serratia plymuthica against Gram negative food-borne pathogens (Escherichia coli O157:h7 and Salmonella Enteritidis) , Ejovwoke F. Ememu, Food Science

The Effect of Cooking on Formation of Bioavailable Species of Iron from Chicken Breast Muscle , Aditya S. Gokhale, Food Science

A Multidisciplinary Approach to Food Safety Evaluation: Hummus Spoilage and Microbial Analysis of Kitchen Surfaces in Residential Child Care Institutions (rcci) in Massachusetts, U.S.A. , Elsina E. Hagan, Food Science

Transfer of Listeria Monocytogenes from Stainless Steel and High Density Polethylyene to Cold Smoked Salmon and Listeria Monocytogenes Biofilm Cohesive Energy Investigation , Fujia Zhang, Food Science

Theses from 2010 2010

Encapsulation of Curcumin in O/w Nanoemulsions and Its Bioaccessibility After In Vitro Digestion , Kashif Ahmed, Food Science

The Effects of Conjugated Linoleic Acid Isomer on Tumor Suppression , Janice Y. Wong, Food Science

Theses from 2009 2009

Levels, Enterotoxigenicity, Growth and Physical Characterisitcs of B. Cereus From U.S Retail Rice , Chandrakant R. Ankolekar, Food Science

Theses from 2008 2008

Impact of Chemical and Physical Properties on the Ability of Antioxidants to Inhibit Lipid Oxidation in Foods , Jean Alamed, Food Science

The Effect of Heating Chicken Muscle on Formation of Bioavailable Froms of Iron , Nilesh B. Karava, Food Science

Food Colloids As Carrier Systems For Antimicrobials , Sarisa Suriyarak, Food Science

Theses from 2007 2007

Colloidal Particles as Antimicrobial Carrier Systems , Dustin W. Carnahan, Food Science

Influence of Preparation and Processing on Cranberry Gel Properties , Maureen A. Pease, Food Science

The Effects of Dietary Calcium and Conjugated Linoleic Acid on Bone Health , Michael Terk, Food Science

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View through a red door, group of students in lab coats smile toward professor in food lab

  • MSc & PhD in Food Science (Thesis/Research)
  • U of G Homepage

Combine the pure sciences to develop innovative and healthy food.

This program is offered through the Department of Food Science which focuses its research on enhancing the quality, safety, functionality and nutrition of foods. Research beside world-renowned professors who focus on food safety, food preservation, dairy science, food analysis, sensory science, nutraceuticals and functional foods.

  #1 in Canada for food science

Study with the best. The University of Guelph is ranked #1 in Canada for Food Science and Technology by U.S. News and World Report .

  Elevate your impact

Broaden your high-paying and leadership career options by achieving a graduate degree. MSc and PhD graduates are highly sought after by Canadian and international food science employers.

  Research-based studies

Alongside a faculty member and other students, you will develop, conduct and publish impactful research that focuses on a topic/issue/opportunity in food science.

  Excellent food science facilities

Access excellent research facilities and equipment. To learn more about the facilities, check out this Virtual Tour of Food Science Labs and Pilot Plant Facilities .

  Leading research centres

Work alongside and in the Canadian Research Institute for Food Safety and the Guelph Food Innovation Centre . 

  Add unique skills to your resume

Benefit from convenient access to short courses, classes and certificates on beer brewing , ice cream and cheese making . 

  • SAMPLE COURSES
  • CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Both programs are offered in-person at the Guelph campus. The MSc typically takes two (2) years, while the PhD takes three to four (3-4) years to complete.

  • Dairy Chemistry and Microbiology
  • Advances in Food Science
  • Food Science Communication
  • Special Topics in Food Physics
  • Special Topics in Food Processing
  • Special Topics in Food for Health

This is just a sample of the course options.  View all Food Science graduate courses here.

A food scientist applies knowledge of microbiology, sensory analysis, biochemistry, chemistry, physics and engineering. Opportunities include 

  • Food production manager  
  • Processing manager  
  • Research and development scientist (in product, process or packaging)
  • Food science professor 
  • Consultant 

Graduates from the Department of Food Science have careers in diverse fields. We recently conducted a career destination survey of 663 master’s graduates and 149 PhD graduates of the department. View the results here: View the results here:

  • Master’s Destinations: Food Science Fact Sheet (PDF)
  • Doctoral Destinations: Food Science Fact Sheet (PDF)

More details on funding your graduate studies are available on the Graduate & Postdoctoral Studies website . Note, many food science graduate students compete successfully for University of Guelph scholarships and awards . 

Female student in lab coat and hijab smiles at lab work bench

More information on courses and admission requirements can be found here.

Meet Your Profs

Mike in green dress shirt, plaid tie and dark suit jacket.

My research focuses on trying to understand the implications of what we eat on health. The area I'm most interested in is looking at lipid replacers for hard stock trans and saturated fats, which are the fats that have negative implications in cardiovascular disease.

Dr. Michael Rogers , Faculty Professor, Department of Food Science Hear more from Dr. Rogers

Gisele in red framed glasses and a black and red sweater

Our relationship with food is such a vital component of our health and microbes play a big role in how to diversify our food and also how they interact with our gut microbiota.

Dr. Gisèle LaPointe , Faculty Professor, Department of Food Science Hear more from Dr. LaPointe

Loong-Tak in metal frame glasses, suit jacket and pale green dress shirt

Many consumers are after products that are fresh, minimally processed, and this is really a challenge for the food industry simply because that the products are no longer as stable, so by using antimicrobial active packaging system we should be able to achieve the required shelf-life as well as meeting the consumer demand on the fresh product.

Dr. Loong-Tak Lim , Faculty Professor, Department of Food Science Hear more from Dr. Lim

Iris in brown patterned scarf

My research focuses on gluten proteins. The functionality of that protein, it's actually a very intriguing protein, it has an unequalled functionality because it builds structures.

Dr. Iris Joye , Faculty Professor, Department of Food Science Hear more from Dr. Joye

Paul in grey collared shirt and gray sweater

Nutraceutical compounds are very popular. They are food derived bioactive molecules meaning that they are isolated from food and concentrated in pill format. Three out of every four Canadians consume these compounds so they're very popular. And so it becomes very important for us to understand how these compounds affect disease pathophysiology as well as disease treatments.

Dr. Paul Spagnuolo , Faculty Professor, Department of Food Science Hear more from Dr. Spagnuolo

Prof. Keith Warriner in metal rimmed glasses and black dress shirt.

Our research is about is food safety, food microbiology specifically. And really what we're trying to do is either prevent or remove pathogens when they're getting to the food to make it safer.

Dr. Keith Warriner , Faculty Professor, Department of Food Science Hear more from Dr. Warriner

Lisa in metal framed glasses and dark grey scarf

Because I do sensory evaluation, somebody once told me to trust my senses and I think in the research that I do, that's very important because when you eat a food you immediately need to respond to the sensory properties of that food. 

Dr. Lisa Duizer , Faculty Professor, Department of Food Science Hear more from Dr. Duizer

How to Apply

As part of the application requirements, you are required to secure a faculty advisor to supervise your program . Faculty profiles describe research programs in more detail and can be found on the Department of Food Science  website. Contact the faculty member you are interested in working with to discuss potential research opportunities. We recommend connecting via email.  

More details on the U of G graduate program application process here .

Admission Requirements

Applications to the M.Sc. and Ph.D. are evaluated on academic performance in a relevant field of study, referee assessments, statement of interest and experience in appropriate and related fields.  View the full Food Science graduate admission requirements here.

Application Deadlines

  • Winter semester (January entry): Applications due by November 1st
  • Summer semester (May entry): Applications due by March 1st
  • Fall semester (September entry): Application by July 1st

More details on the U of G graduate program application process here.

Helpful Tips for Your Application

  • Review the  uploading documents  information for instructions on providing required supporting documents to complete your application.   
  • Application to the M.Sc. and Ph.D. require a department supplemental document called the “ Application Fact Sheet ”. Include a completed Application Fact Sheet in your application package via WebAdvisor. 
  • Offer letters indicate the requirement for official transcripts by the first class day of the semester in which you start your program.
  • International applicants should apply with consideration given to time needed for immigration procedures if you receive an offer. International students are required to submit a valid study permit and passport when they arrive on campus. 
  • Not sure what your “admission average” is? Here’s more details on how to calculate it: Calculating Your Admission Average | Graduate & Postdoctoral Studies . International applicants: please  use this guide  to compare your academic credentials and determine the grade equivalency needed. Additional information available on the  International Applicants  page.
  • More resources for international applicants are available on the U of G Graduate & Postdoctoral website.

Additional Options

You may also be interested in MSc in Food Safety and Quality Assurance (Course-based) or the Master in Dairy Technology Management (Course-based) .

For questions on applying and admissions, contact: 

Aimee Caldwell Department of Food Science  [email protected] 519-824-4120, Ext. 52705 

For questions on graduate program options, contact:

Leigh West Ontario Agricultural College (OAC) [email protected] 519-824-4120 Ext. 52101  

Hear from Food Science Graduate Students

Brock in tan sweater stands in front of brown-leafed shrub

I specifically pursued research at the University of Guelph because the program has more to offer than any other food science program. Moreover, I deeply admire the research conducted by my supervisor, Dr. Loong-Tak Lim.

Brock Levac , Graduate Student MSc in Food Science Hear more from Brock

Brenda smiles with her brown hair blowing slightly in the wind

Food science is a very important field within our industry and in our everyday lives. There was definitely no shortage of finding jobs within the field. There are lots of opportunities for students to get involved and jumpstart their career.

Brenda Zai , Graduate Student MSc in Food Science Hear more from Brenda

phd thesis in food science and technology

The Department of Food Science is a great community and I’ve found it easy to get involved and make friends. I’ve been a member of the Food Science Graduate Club for the past few years and help to plan events for faculty, staff, and graduate students. I’ve also been a Food Chemistry teaching assistant (TA) throughout my grad studies which has been a lot of fun and has given me the opportunity to get to know and learn alongside the Food Science undergrads each year.

Katherine Petker PhD in Food Science

College of Human Sciences

College of agriculture and life sciences, food science and technology.

  • Graduate Students >
  • Graduate Programs >

Food science and technology program offers these degrees:

  • Master of Science
  • Doctor of Philosophy and Technology
  • Graduate minor
  • Graduate work in meat science is offered as a co-major in Animal Science and Food Science and Technology

Learning Outcomes

  • Apply scientific thinking in the analysis, synthesis and evaluation of knowledge within the discipline of food science, nutritional sciences or dietetics.
  • Apply ethical reasoning within the discipline of food science, nutritional sciences or dietetics.
  • Effectively communicate discipline-specific information in written and oral forms to scientific audiences.
  • Effectively interact within scientific teams.

Outcomes Assessment

  • Satisfactory completion of degree course requirements with a minimum cumulative GPA ≥ 3.0, including a grade of B- or better for courses within the major.
  • Satisfactory seminar attendance
  • Student-developed POSC assigned to ensure satisfactory program of study
  • Successful defense of original thesis research to POSC
  • For Ph.D. students, satisfactory completion of written and oral preliminary examination
  • Professional presentation of thesis research as a departmental seminar
  • Preparation of a manuscript for submission to a peer-reviewed journal
  • Formal evaluation of teaching efforts
  • Annual review of student progress by a committee of faculty
  • Secure professional-level position in a relevant area such as academia, industry, government, or health care

Prerequisite

Undergraduate preparation should include emphasis in chemistry and biology, food science, nutritional science, or dietetics.

General Requirements

  • Students must choose a thesis or non-thesis option for the M.S. degree.
  • There are specific minimum coursework requirements for each degree and option.
  • Your Program of Study (POS) Committee may determine you need additional coursework.
  • Each student is required to consult with his or her major professor every term prior to registration for course work.
  • Coursework for the degree program requires approval of the POS committee, the Food Science and Technology director of graduate education (DOGE), and the ISU Graduate College, as filed with the program of study (POS) plan.

Program of Study (POS) Committee

The Program of Study Committee is chosen by the graduate student and the major professor and is approved by the director of graduate education (DOGE). This committee directs the course of the student’s degree program.

Master’s Thesis Option POS Committee

  • The thesis option master’s POS committee consists of at least three members, all of whom must be members of the graduate faculty.
  • Two members must be from the major or program, including the major professor.
  • The committee must include members from different majors or different departments so as to ensure diversity of perspectives.
  • One member of the committee must be from outside of the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition (FSHN) to provide perspective and to serve as an advocate, if necessary, for the masters student.

A term member of the graduate faculty may participate in the direction of a student’s masters research as a co-major professor if a member of the Food Science and Technology graduate faculty serves as the other co-major professor and jointly accepts responsibility for the direction of a program of study.

Doctoral POS Committee

  • The POS Committee for the Food Science and Technology doctoral program consists of at least five members of the graduate faculty.
  • At least three members must be from within food science and technology and must include the major professor.
  • One member of the committee must be from outside of the FSHN department to provide perspective and serves as an advocate, if necessary, for the doctoral student.

A term member of the graduate faculty may participate in the direction of a student’s dissertation research as a co-major professor if a member of the Food Science and Technology graduate faculty serves as the other co-major professor and jointly accepts responsibility for direction of the dissertation.

Minor in Food Science and Technology

Food science and technology graduate minor curriculum.

  • 9 to 15 credits required
  • 9 credits of graduate level food science course work as approved by the POSC, with a maximum of 3 credits at the 400 level.
  • In addition, students without a background in food chemistry, food engineering/processing, and/or food microbiology are required to take FSHN 511 and two 600-level courses in two different competency areas.

Related Minors

Students pursuing a doctorate in food science and technology may choose minors from other fields including anthropology, chemistry, biochemistry, economics, education, journalism, microbiology, psychology, physiology, sociology, statistics, toxicology, or other related fields.

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Graduate Program

Welcome to the Food Science Graduate Group. Members of this group apply a fundamental understanding of biological, chemical, physical, and behavioral sciences to the processing, preservation, quality evaluation, public health aspects, and utilization of foods. The graduate group offers programs leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in Food Science, with research pursued under the direction of one of our faculty members.

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Food science and technology (ph.d., m.s., minor).

The Department of Food Science and Technology offers graduate programs leading toward the Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. A variety of research specializations are available covering the chemical, physical, microbiological, and sensory properties of foods.

Areas of thesis research

Research disciplines.

  • Flavor chemistry
  • Food chemistry/biochemistry
  • Food and health
  • Food microbiology/biotechnology
  • Sensory science
  • Sustainable food manufacturing

Special research topics

  • Enology/brewing/distilling

  Food Science And Technology Website

  College of Agricultural Sciences

  Graduate Handbook

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Primary Contact

Admissions requirements.

Primarily summer and fall terms. Please contact the program for information on applying to winter and spring terms.

Required Tests

English language requirements .

English language requirements for international applicants to this program are the same as the standard Graduate School requirements .

Additional Requirements

Application requirements, including required documents, letters, and forms, vary by program and may not be completely represented here. The processing of your application will not be completed until these requirements have been met. Please, before applying to this program, always contact the program office to confirm application requirements.

Application Process

Please review the graduate school application process and Apply Online .

Dates & Deadlines ?

Admissions deadline.

30 days prior to the start of the term. FST’s primarily admits for the fall term.

Funding Deadline

To maximize the opportunity for all prestigious fellowships and scholarships, please apply by Jan. 15.

Concentrations ?

Mais participation.

This program is not offered as a MAIS field of study.

AMP Participation ?

This program does not participate in the Accelerated Master's Platform (AMP)

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Food Science M.S. & Ph.D.

Within the areas of food chemistry and sensory science , we're studying flavor chemistry, manipulation of storage components, food safety and toxicology, structure-function behavior, and chemical stability of foods.

If you are interested in food microbiology , you may like to study with faculty members whose research addresses genetic and physiological manipulation of bacteria, growth conditions and their effects on microbes, and fermentation.

Chemical/microbial food safety researchers look into safety, production, and preservation and relations to human health.

If you are interested in food processing and engineering can benefit from studying with faculty members researching topics including the effects of thermal processing on fats and oils, bioprocessing, state-of-the-art novel processing technologies, heat and mass transfer analysis, rheology, the use of acoustic ultrasound in processing, production systems modeling and optimization, and development of bio-based, biodegradable resins, and plastics.

In-residence students selecting to focus on food science for their graduate education can pursue thesis or non-thesis M.S. and Ph.D. programs.

Course descriptions

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Theses and Dissertations (Food Science)

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  • Food patterns in relation to weight status and body composition of female adolescents in Tshwane  Matete, Ntsepase P. ( University of Pretoria , 2022 ) Introduction: In South Africa there is a high prevalence of overweight/ obesity among adolescence, which in turn indicates an increased risk of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in adulthood (DoH, 2016, WHO, 2018). ...
  • Sensory properties and consumer acceptance of orange-fleshed sweet potato bread : the effect of food neophobia  Steyn, Annelize ( University of Pretoria , 2022 ) A considerable effort is placed on developing food products for food-insecure environments. Vitamin A deficiency is a problem that is plaguing the nutrition security of many consumers in Sub-Saharan Africa. Nutrition ...
  • Characterisation, health-promoting properties and food applications of anthocyanin-rich pigments of flowers from the Geraniaceae and Lamiaceae plant families  Venter, Anton ( University of Pretoria , 2022-04-18 ) Colour is an important characteristic of food and plays a significant role in enhancing the visual appeal of food products. The colourants mostly used in the food industry are synthetic azo-dyes due to their brightness and ...
  • Bioaccessibility of phenolic compounds and related antioxidant and health promoting properties of soured sorghum porridges  Dlamini, Nomfumdo ( University of Pretoria , 2022-06-06 ) The percentage of deaths due to non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as diabetes, cancer, obesity and heart disease has been growing steadily in South Africa. Rapid urbanization and increased demand for convenience foods ...
  • Pasting properties of teff, maize, and potato starches with added microcrystalline cellulose and cellulose nanofiber  Kawuma, Reagan ( University of Pretoria , 2022 ) An increase in health concerns from consumers towards the use of synthetic chemicals in starchy food formulation has led to a significant preference for “clean” label starches. Hydrocolloids are organically-sourced ...
  • Antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of Carica papaya extracts in minimally processed fresh produce  Kafuko, Lilian ( University of Pretoria , 2022 ) Food (especially fruit derived) waste has a detrimental influence on the environment and food security of a country. As the world’s population continues to rise, the challenge becomes feeding more people nutrient dense ...
  • Nutritional, antioxidant and microbiological properties of finger millet-based beverages as influenced by starch source during lactic acid fermentation  Nyathi, Lungani A. ( University of Pretoria , 2021 ) In Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), where nutrient malnutrition is of concern, finger millet contributes substantially to the dietary protein and mineral intake of many communities. The quality of finger millet protein is, however, ...
  • Nutritional and health benefits of heat - moisture treated maize starch and maize meal with stearic acid  Asare, Isaac Kwabena ( University of Pretoria , 2022 ) ABSTRACT Nutritional and health benefits of hydrothermally treated maize starch and maize meal with stearic acid By Isaac Kwabena Asare Supervisor: Prof M.N Emmambux Co-Supervisor Prof Bruce R. Hamaker Diet-related ...
  • The application of dehydration technologies on drying kinetics and physicochemical properties of orange-fleshed sweet potato  Kgonothi, Daddy ( University of Pretoria , 2021 ) Orange-fleshed sweet potato is a highly researched crop due to its nutritional content and more specifically, its high β-carotene content. Most developing countries around the world have adopted the use of orange-fleshed ...
  • Extended shelf life milk processing : effect of cleaning-in-place (CIP) on the survival of bacillus subtilis  Adonis, Nanamhla ( University of Pretoria , 2021 ) Bacillus subtilis vegetative cells have been found to remain in dairy processing equipment such as filler nozzles and heat exchangers even after cleaning processes such as Cleaning in Place (CIP). The cells form biofilms ...
  • Sensory quality control in food companies: towards improving knowledge, attitudes and practices assessment as well as sensory quality management  Onojakpor, Ogheneyoma ( University of Pretoria , 2021 ) Limited knowledge and support for sensory quality control (SQC) in food companies and the associated misapplication of sensory evaluation principles may lead to defective products reaching consumers. Subsequently, customer ...
  • Sensory and physico-chemical analysis of roasted marama beans [Tylosema esculentum (Burchell) A. Schreiber] with specific focus on compounds that may contribute to bitterness  Nyembwe, Patricia ( University of Pretoria , 2013 ) Marama bean [Tylosema esculentum (Burchell) A. Schreiber] is an underutilized legume which grows wild in selected part of southern Africa and forms part of the diet for the indigenous population in this area. Marama bean ...
  • Sensory and nutritional quality of orange-fleshed sweet potato crisps from roots with varying physico-chemical properties  Makame, James ( University of Pretoria , 2015 ) The sensory and nutritional quality of orange-fleshed sweet potato (OFSP) crisps can be optimized by utilizing storage roots with suitable physical and chemical properties. Three root types from the OFSP cultivars Impilo, ...
  • Perceptions and acceptance of grapefruit-like model beverages that vary in taste colour and aroma sensory properties : effects of sensitivity to bitter taste and TAS2R38 and TAS2R19 bitter receptor genes  Gous, Andries Gustav Stefanus ( University of Pretoria , 2019 ) Grapefruit juice is an excellent source of many nutrients and phytochemicals that contribute to a healthy diet. Currently, there is an increasing interest in grapefruit products because consumption appears to be associated ...
  • Nutritional and functional properties of soaked and micronized Bambara groundnut seeds and their flours  Ogundele, Opeoluwa Mayowa ( University of Pretoria , 2016 ) Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranean L.) is considered a good source of protein in some parts of sub Saharan African countries. Long cooking time of about three hours contributed to its limited consumption and utilisation. ...
  • Utilisation of marama bean [Tylosema esculentum (Burchell) A. Schreiber] flour in gluten-free bread making  Nyembwe Mujinga, Patricia ( University of Pretoria , 2020 ) Interest in gluten-free (GF) bakery products due to wheat allergies and the incidence of coeliac disease, has led to research that continually explores new ingredients and formulations. One aim is to manufacture GF breads ...
  • The nutritive, rheological and sensory quality of selected indigenous complementary foods used for 6 – 24 months infants and young children in African communities  Makame, James ( University of Pretoria , 2020-09 ) Child malnutrition remains a major public health problem in low-income African communities, caused by factors including the porridge rheology, poor oral texture quality and low nutritional value of mainly the indigenous/local ...
  • Sensory attributes of chicken meat in relation to microbial and physicochemical characteristics  Katiyo, Wendy ( University of Pretoria , 2020 ) In line with global trends, chicken meat is the most consumed source of animal protein in South Africa. Raw chicken meat is frequently contaminated with Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter spp., and is highly susceptible to ...
  • Modified atmosphere packaging and irradiation preservation of a sorghum porridge and spinach relish meal  Obilana, Anthony Olusegun ( University of Pretoria , 1998 ) South Africa is faced with the challenge of providing food security for its entire people. Those particularly in need are people residing in the former homelands and people in the newly developed informal, urban settlements. ...
  • Molecular characterization of Bacillus sporothermodurans in Ultra High Temperature (UHT) milk  Owusu-Darko, Rodney ( University of Pretoria , 2019 ) Bacillus sporothermodurans spores are known to withstand Ultra high temperature (UHT) processing. The surviving spores germinate and cause the technological problem of non-sterility in milk and milk products. This high ...

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Department of Food Science, Nutrition and Health Promotion | Mississippi State University | Home

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Food Science & Technology Graduate Studies

Food Science and Technology Graduate Studies

Students may pursue a master's or doctoral degree in Food Science, Nutrition and Health Promotion with a concentration in Food Science and Technology. A Bachelor of Science in Food Technology, Food Science, or related areas will be considered to meet the prerequisites for study toward an advanced degree. Students from other disciplines may be required to take leveling courses generally not to exceed 15 semester hours.

Master of Science in Food Science, Nutrition and Health Promotion

The Master of Science in Food Science, Nutrition and Health Promotion with a concentration in Food Science and Technology requires a minimum of 30 hours of graduate credit (Including 6 hours of research/thesis), a research thesis, and a final defense. At least 12 hours of coursework must be taken at the 8000-level. Graduate assistantships may be available.

Doctor of Philosophy in Food Science, Nutrition and Health Promotion

The Ph.D. program in Food Science, Nutrition and Health Promotion with a concentration in Food Science and Technology is designed for individuals with graduate or B.S. degrees in related sciences who want to gain more in-depth research and academic experience. The minimum number of coursework hours for a Ph.D. student varies according to the specific requirements of the department and the student’s needs but usually requires a minimum of 60 hours of coursework beyond the B.S. degree.

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Postgraduate Programmes in Food Science & Technology

The food science & technology unit operates under the department of chemical engineering where it provides offerings of one (1) taught masters degree in food science & technology and two (2) degrees by research at the mphil and phd level. in order to keep its programmes relevant and applicable to industry, the unit maintains links with the food processing industry and other relevant stakeholders, particularly in the area of food product development/developmental research. staff are also involved in scientific and technical societies, in particular, the institute of food technologists (usa), the canadian institute of food science & technology and the institute of food science & technology (uk), they also maintain contacts with numerous overseas institutions which they visit, and in which they sometimes conduct research. the food science and technology unit is equipped with science laboratories that include a semi-commercial processing hall containing a range of small-scale equipment suitably instrumented for the systematic study of operations involved in the food industry — along with a food microbiology laboratory, a quality assurance laboratory, a food research laboratory with specialized analytical equipment, and a sensory evaluation facility. graduates of our programmes have found employment in the food industry, mainly in research and development, quality assurance and production management. some individuals are engaged in research and innovation in government and industry-sponsored research organizations. other graduates are academic staff within universities. many opportunities also arise within catering food service establishments and pharmaceutical industries, in teaching, in libraries and information centres, and within overseas institutions and development agencies., programme objectives and learning outcomes, these postgraduate programmes guide students in the application of scientific principles toward the development of new food products, design of innovative processing/packaging/distribution technologies, improvement of food quality and nutritional value, enhancement of the safety of foods and in ensuring the wholesomeness and availability of our food supply. in a broad sense, students graduating from this programme would be able to:, accommodate the useful application of knowledge to the developmental needs of the food industry in the caribbean, to the real world of commerce, and to the public need, foster scholastic achievement in academics and in the conduct of research by both applied and theoretical methods, thus producing individuals equipped for research, innovation and production in the food industry, in government institutions, in other universities and research institutions, in development agencies, in other teaching and technical establishments, and in libraries and information centres, research within the food science & technology unit is aimed at the development of the indigenous food resources of the caribbean region., areas of research, current research includes:, food analysis, food safety and risk assessment, food preference and sensory studies, food fermentations, milk, meat, fish and seafood, fruit and vegetable microbiology and technology, food dehydration, root crop processing and food product development, msc programme structure and course requirements, following the guidelines established by the institute of food technologists in the united states of america and the institute of food science & technology in the united kingdom, students will be required to pursue an appropriate course of study as determined by the uwi school for graduate studies and research, st. augustine and the department of chemical engineering — food science & technology unit. students are required to complete 41 credits for the award of the msc food science & technology. students should demonstrate proficiency in food science & technology by satisfactory completion of at least 35 credits of coursework (comprised of core and compulsory courses) and 6 credits in their research project. duration of study: the msc programme is offered both part-time and full-time, and must be completed in 3 years and 5 years respectively. course load: a part-time student is required to carry half the course load per semester than that of a full-time student., msc programme course listing, core courses, 32 credits  , compulsory course, 3 credits  , research project, 6 credits  , students are to note the following:, part-time students must normally submit their fost 6019 project reports twelve (12) months from date of registration, full-time students must normally submit their fost 6019 project reports nine (9) months from date of registration, candidates who fail to submit their reports in good time shall be removed from the register of postgraduate students., mphil / phd programme structure and course requirements, these being research degrees, students will be expected to produce a satisfactory thesis (mphil or phd) as stipulated in the university's regulations. depending upon their academic background, students will be required to read departmental courses totaling six (6) credits for mphil or nine (9) credits for phd. these courses will be used to direct the student's approach towards the research topic, in particular, strengthening their food science knowledge base in the specific area of interest and to research methodology in general. candidates are required to pass both the coursework and the written examinations before submitting the thesis. the mphil degree shall be awarded on the basis of an examination by thesis and the appropriate university regulations for the master’s degree shall apply. for a phd degree , the appropriate university and faculty of engineering regulations for award of the degree of doctor of philosophy shall apply. attendance at the oral examination for the phd degree in the faculty of engineering shall be open to the academic and professional community. a minimum of seven days notice shall be given before the examination., what's next, for  further information  on the msc / mphil / phd food science & technology programmes, please contact us with your questions.  information on the application and registration process can be found via the links below.  .

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Graduate student handbook.

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Contacts and Communication

Graduate forms, degree programs and certificate options, annual progress report/ supervisory committee meeting requirement, course requirements, minimum grade requirements, master of science degree with thesis requirements, master of science degree with project requirements, doctoral degree requirements, optional minor requirements, food safety and defense certificate requirements, changing degree objectives, graduate school expectations, research and projects, research and writing resources, probation and termination, tuition and fees, digital badges, professional development opportunities, assistantships, fellowships and travel grants, graduate student office space and mailboxes, application for admissions for master or doctoral degree, admission requirements for master or doctoral degree, application for admissions for food safety and defense graduate certificate, graduate education oversight.

The purpose of this handbook is to provide a summary of policies and procedures relevant to studies in the Food Science and Technology graduate program and for successful completion of an advanced degree. All graduate students should refer to this handbook as a reference. However, this handbook is not a replacement for the UNL Graduate Studies Catalog, which contains current information on graduate program requirements, thesis guidelines, and deadlines. The information in this handbook and other University catalogs, publications, or announcements is subject to change without notice. From the UNL Office of Graduate Studies Graduate and Professional Catalog: “It is the responsibility of the student to be familiar with the information in the UNL Graduate Catalog and on the Graduate Studies website , and to know and observe all regulations and procedures relating to the program he or she is pursuing. In no case will a regulation be waived or an exception granted because a student pleads ignorance of, or contends that he or she was not informed of, the regulations or procedures. A student planning to graduate should be familiar with the dates relating to application for graduation and other pertinent deadlines. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln expressly reserves the right to: add or delete courses from its offerings and to change times or locations; change academic calendars without notice; cancel any course for insufficient registrations; modify, consolidate, or delete any program; and revise or change rules, charges, fees, schedules, courses, requirements for degrees, and any other regulation affecting students including, but not limited to, evaluation standards, whenever considered necessary or desirable.”

Departmental Contacts FDST Department Graduate Chair Dr. Amanda Ramer-Tait [email protected] 402-472-7293 FIC 260

FDST Department Head Dr. Curtis Weller [email protected] 402-472-9337 FIC 233

FDST MS Project Coordinator Dr. Rossana Villa Rojas [email protected] 402-472-0479 FIC 263

Food Safety and Defense Certificate Chair Dr. Byron Chaves [email protected] 402-472-2196 FIC 255

FDST Graduate Program Coordinator Mrs. Julie McManamey [email protected] 402-472-5301 FIC 231

Office of Graduate Studies Contacts Graduate Studies Masters Coordinator Terri Eastin [email protected] 402-472-2875 Seaton Hall 101 [email protected]

Graduate Studies Doctoral Coordinator Kelsey Sims [email protected] 402-472-2875 Seaton Hall 101

Graduate Student Support Director Eva Bachman [email protected] 402-472-8669 Seaton Hall 101

College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Contacts Associate Dean for Graduate Education Dr. Thomas Burkey [email protected] 402-472-6423 Agricultural Hall 103

Coordinator for Graduate Student Professional Development Jocelyn Bullock [email protected] 402-472-5920 Agricultural Hall 103

MS Teams A team account in Microsoft Teams has been created for current Food Science and Technology students to connect, collaborate and share tips and ideas. Online meetings may be set up with the Graduate Program Coordinator, Mrs. Julie McManamey through Teams.

Huskers Email Account Students receive a new e-mail account (huskers.unl.edu) when they enroll. In May 2019, the University of Nebraska-Lincoln made it mandatory that all university correspondence go to a student’s Huskers email account. Students are reponsible for checking their huskers.unl.edu account regularly.

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 Office of Graduate Studies

  • Master’s Degree Milestones, Requirements, Forms and Deadlines: https://www.unl.edu/gradstudies/academics/degrees/masters
  • Doctoral Degree Milestones, Requirements, Forms and Deadlines: https://www.unl.edu/gradstudies/academics/degrees/doctoral

 Application for Admission  Go to the Application section of this handbook or see Office of Graduate Studies

Department Introduction

As a graduate student in our program, you will work closely with internationally recognized faculty. Our research areas are dedicated to solving real problems within the food system, from harvest to food processing to consumption to individual health. We invite you to work alongside faculty conducting research on food allergens, bioinformatics, biotechnology, food chemistry, food engineering, human health, food microbiology, food processing, food safety, and risk analysis.

Food Science and Technology faculty are located in the Food Innovation Center on Nebraska Innovation Campus (NIC) . The Food Innovation Center includes state-of-the-art classrooms, teaching labs, wet/dry lab research space, clinical facilities, a sensory lab, and pilot plants.

The Food Science and Technology graduate program is flexible, allowing you to tailor your curriculum to meet your individual interests and goals. Program alumni now hold positions in industry, at academic institutions, and within government agencies.

Vision Statement To be a global leader in advancing transdisciplinary approaches for safe, sustainable, and healthy foods through innovative research, teaching and outreach.

Mission Statement

  • To provide high-quality education and training to individuals preparing for careers in food science and technology in the food industry, academia, or government.
  • To conduct basic and applied research in food science and technology for the ultimate benefit of the food industry and consumers.
  • To provide assistance to the food industry through extension programs of the Department.

Areas of Research

  • Our primary areas of research include:
  • Food Allergens
  • Food Safety
  • Food Preservation and Transformation
  • Biocomputing and Data Science
  • Diet, Microbiome, and Host Interactions in Human Health
  • Dietary Bioactive Agents and Functional Foods

Service and Research Centers

  • The Food Processing Center (including the UNL Dairy Store)
  • Food Allergy Research and Resource Program
  • Nebraska Food for Health Center
  • Nebraska Gnotobiotic Mouse Program

Degree Programs We offer interdisciplinary programs leading to both masters and doctoral degrees. Students take courses and conduct research with faculty members located on the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s Nebraska Innovation Campus.

  • Master of Science Degree (M.S.) in Food Science and Technology
  • Thesis (requires 30 credit hours)
  • Project (requires 30 credit hours)
  • Doctoral Degree (Ph.D.) in Food Science and Technology
Dissertation (requires 90 credit hours

Certificate Options

  •  Food Safety and Defense Graduate Certificate (online only, requires 12 hours) (Part of the Great Plains Interactive Distance Education Alliance, in cooperation with University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Kansas State University, and the University of Missouri)

The faculty advisor or supervisory committee may call a meeting to review a student’s performance at any time with a two-week notice.

All Food Science and Technology graduate students are required to complete a Student Progress Report form and meet with their supervisory committee at least once a year to review progress and discuss future research/projects and academic plans. The Student Progress Report is cumulative and should reflect a student’s entire graduate experience (i.e., each Student Progress Report should build on the prior years’ reports). In addition to reviewing and discussing the Student Progress Report at the annual meeting, students should work with their faculty advisors to determine if additional elements for the meeting are needed, such as the student providing an oral presentation. The annual committee meeting may coincide with paperwork for establishing the supervisory committee and program of study as well as with the mid-program project proposal defense.

Students must email their completed Student Progress Report to their supervisory committee members and the FDST Graduate Coordinator at least two weeks prior to the meeting.

If a student fails to submit a Student Progress Report, then the student may receive an “Unsatisfactory” rating and be placed on probation.

Review Process On Student Progress Report, the student will present a summary of his/her past academic and research accomplishments and plans for the future. Supervisory committee members vote and provide feedback if a student’s performance is:

  • Satisfactory Meets expectations, has made progress, earned minimum grade requirements, clearly presented their research and a plan for future work towards degree completion.
  • Needs Improvement Meets some expectations but has deficiencies in certain areas (i.e., not meeting deadlines, insufficient reading of the literature, less than adequate writing skills, no clear plan for the future). If a student receives a “Needs Improvement” rating, then deficiencies will be discussed and suggestions to overcome those deficiencies will be proposed. The deficiencies and corrective steps will be documented on the Student Progress Report form.
  • Unsatisfactory Does not meet expectations. In addition to the Needs Improvement deficiencies above, the student does not spend enough time in the lab, is not synthesizing research concepts, does not use proper controls, and cannot make conclusions from research results. Failure to meet with the supervisory committee once per year may also result in an in “Unsatisfactory” rating. If a student receives “Unsatisfactory” rating, then the student will be placed on probation and a written six- month improvement plan must be submitted to the FDST Graduate Committee within two weeks. After submitting the improvement plan, the student will provide a written progress report 3 months later and hold a supervisory committee meeting 6 months later.

At the six-month supervisory committee meeting, all supervisory committee members must determine if the student has completed the plan and is making satisfactory progress. If the student fails to achieve satisfactory status, then the student will be terminated from the graduate program. A written letter or memo must be submitted to the FDST Graduate Committee to report any change in status.

FDST 90-954 Graduate Student Orientation Offered every fall and spring semester – Class meets in-person; meeting via web conferencing is only with instructor permission.

Catalog Course Description Introduction to the Department of Food Science and Technology, Food Innovation Center, university services, career paths and community building with fellow students. ENGL 887 GESL and/or Academic Research Skills for International Students This is an Office of Graduate Studies requirement. ENGL 887 is an advanced tutorial in academic writing for international graduate students. International graduate students are automatically enrolled in ENGL 887 GESL and/or Academic Research Skills for International Students their first semester if their English Proficiency Exam Writing Scores do not meet the minimum requirements. ENGL 887 GESL and/or Academic Research Skills does not count toward the student’s Plan of Study.

Professional Development Courses Graduate education is more than just taking courses, meeting milestones, and doing research for a thesis or dissertation or preparing a project. Three important components of graduate education include:

  • Learning about the interdisciplinary nature of food science and technology and reflecting on broader impacts
  • Communicating complex scientific concepts and findings to a variety of audiences
  • Contributing to educational endeavors and teaching others

The following include the minimum credit hours required for a graduate student’s Plan of Study. Graduate students are encouraged to attend the Fall Department of Food Science and Technology Seminar series and participate in the Spring Food Science and Technology Research Symposium even if they are not enrolled in the course.

FDST 951 Advanced Food Science and Technology Seminar Offered every fall semester – Class meets in-person; meeting via web conferencing is only with instructor permission. To count on a graduate student’s Plan of Study, students must earn a letter grade of B or better.

Catalog Course Description Advanced study and discussion of scientific research pertaining to food science and technology.

Learning Outcomes The purpose of this course is to immerse students in the interdisciplinary nature of food science and technology by joining the scholars in their field. Students will learn about and discuss new research discoveries and current research methods. Students will be evaluated through a written self-reflection journal what they learned from the seminar and how that new knowledge influences their own research. Students will also be expected to write about the potential broader impacts of the work presented in the seminar

Invited seminar speakers from within and outside UNL will be hosted each week, providing students with opportunities to network and interact with fellow scholars. Hosting speakers with a variety of backgrounds will provide students with opportunities to learn about career opportunities and potential employers. FDST 952 Professional Food Science Communication Offered every spring semester – Class meets in-person; meeting via web conferencing is only with instructor permission .

To count on a graduate student’s Plan of Study, students must earn a letter grade of B or better.

Catalog Course Description Best practices for science communication through practical delivery of food science and technology knowledge to a variety of audiences.

Learning Outcomes Effective science communication helps advance society’s understanding of what scientists do, how they make discoveries, and why those discoveries are important. The purpose of this course is for students to become competent communicators of complex scientific concepts and findings related to their project, thesis or dissertation. Students will be evaluated through an oral and visual presentation given at a one-day public Food Science and Technology Research Symposium.

FDST 896-002 Teaching Assistant Experience Offered every fall and spring semester

To count on a graduate student’s Plan of Study, students must earn a passing (P) grade.

Oversight Committee

The FDST Graduate Committee in conjunction with the Teaching Lab Manager and Department Head will:

  • Consider faculty and student teaching assistant requests
  • Assign teaching assistant experiences
  • Meet as needed to address other issues that arise regarding TA experience

Catalog Course Description A structured training experience in the professional skills used by teaching and learning assistants in food science and technology laboratories, recitations and lectures; assist in the instruction of food science and technology concepts.

Teaching assistants are an integral part of teaching food science and technology concepts within the UNL Department of Food Science and Technology. Teaching assistant experiences are invaluable for learning how to interact with people in meaningful ways and when confronted with difficult situations. Graduate students should consider this experience as a way to improve their teaching and communication skills and as their contribution to the educational endeavors of the Department. Being a teaching assistant is also a time to shadow and network with faculty as well as develop teaching skills.

Expectations

  • A teaching experience must be associated with a course taught in the Department of Food Science and Technology.
  • Teaching assistants are expected to be on campus one week before classes begins through one week after final exams to participate in orientations, teaching preparations, and to assist with final exam grading.
  • Commit an average of 10 hours per week to the assigned teaching assistant experience.
  • The actual number of required hours per week may vary throughout the semester.
  • Specific responsibilities vary depending upon the course and the instructor.
  • Teaching assistants are required to attend weekly preparatory meetings scheduled by the instructor and teaching lab manager; prepare laboratory media and course materials, including setting up and cleaning up labs; grade papers, proctor exams; assist students with laboratory or lecture exercises; answer students’ questions; and/or prepare and deliver lectures or lab presentations.

Requirements

  • Submit Teaching Assistant Experience Request form
  • We do our best to match TA assignments based on student preferences; however, the TA assignments are based primarily on course and instructor needs.
  • Once assigned a position, a permission code is sent to the student so they can enroll in FDST 896-002
  • Attend teaching assistantship orientation
  • Complete all required training, such as classroom safety training and classroom instruction
  • Complete an agreement of duties with instructor(s) and Teaching Lab Manager at the beginning of the Teaching Assistant Experience
  • Submit Teaching Assistant Completion Form
  • At the end of the semester, teaching assistants must schedule an appointment with their instructor supervisor and Lab Manager to complete an evaluation

Consideration for Full-Time (1.0 FTE) Employees Graduate students who are full-time employees should work with their faculty advisor and the FDST Graduate Committee Chair to identify how their expertise could complement one of our FDST courses. Teaching experiences for full-time employees may include developing and presenting laboratories or developing and presenting course materials for web conference or online delivery.

Course Conflicts and Requesting Exceptions for FDST Required Courses A student who is unable to meet the minimum course requirements for FDST 951, FDST 952 or FDST 896-002 may, after receiving approval from their supervisory committee, make an email request to the Grad Chair (and Coordinator) with justification/ documentation for a waiver or course substitution when they submit their Plan of Study to the Food Science and Technology Graduate Committee. The Graduate Committee must review and approve all such waivers/substitutions prior to submitting the Plan of Study to the Office of Graduate Studies.

The following minimum grades are required to earn credit in graduate-level courses:

The comprehensive exam for the minor may be waived if all grades in the minor are at least a B or P (pass). Courses taken to fulfill requirements for a graduate certificate and later applied toward a graduate degree must meet the minimum grade requirements for the degree, which may be higher.

Grades below the minimum requirement cannot be applied toward a degree or graduate certificate. Students failing to receive a minimum acceptable grade may not continue their program of studies without permission of their supervisory committee or the departmental graduate committee. Grading System and Grade Appeals Process

Master of Science Degree, Option A, consists of original research that contributes to new knowledge. It is designed to prepare students for careers in research and industry. MS Option A students go on to doctoral degree programs or are hired into scientist, technologist, or research and development positions in industry, laboratories and government agency.

Master of Science Degree, Option A, requires a thesis. It requires graduate assistantship funding offered by a faculty member within the Department of Food Science and Technology or another organization’s funding (e.g. government fellowships, employer sponsorship, etc.), other than personal funds.

Length of Program

  • If enrolled full-time, students typically complete the Master of Science Thesis in 2-2 ½ years.
  • Students must complete their Master of Science degree within 5 consecutive years from their first term of admission.

Supervisory Committee A student’s supervisory committee should be formed by the end of the student’s 2nd semester (or before completion of 15 credit hours). Requirements

  •  Minimum of three committee members
  •  Faculty advisor serves as chair
  •  At least two committee members must be Food Science and Technology faculty. The third member may be from Food Science and Technology or another department.

Minor: Students seeking a minor are required to have a graduate faculty member from the minor program on their Supervisory Committee. It is at the discretion of the minor faculty advisor as to whether they elect to be on the student’s supervisory committee as long as a minor comprehensive exam is not required.

UNL Full-time Employees To reduce conflict of interest, University of Nebraska-Lincoln full-time (1.0 FTE) employees must identify a faculty advisor other than their immediate work supervisor. Their work supervisor may serve on their supervisory committee as a member.

Plan of Study (Memorandum of Courses) A Plan of Study consists of courses considered necessary for the student’s degree. A Plan of Study is intended to be flexible to meet the educational objectives of the student and to build on previous academic experiences. The student, along with the Supervisory Committee, should select courses that best support the student’s research, overall academic program, and career goals.

A student’s Plan of Study should be completed by the end of the student’s 2nd semester (or before completion of 15 credit hours). Students may not file a Memorandum of Courses and graduate in the same term. Requirements

  • Only courses with 800 or 900 level course numbers can be counted for graduate credit
  • Minimum of 30 semester credit hours
  • At least one-half (15 hours), including thesis credits, must be in Food Science and Technology (FDST)
  • Minimum of 8 credit hours must be 800 or 900 level without 400-level counterparts (excludes FDST 899)
  • 6-10 hours of FDST 899 Master Thesis credit hours
  • Minimum of 1 credit hour of FDST 896-002 Teaching Assistant
  • Minimum of 1 credit hour of FDST 951 Seminar
  • Minimum of 1 credit hour of FDST 952 Professional Communication

Transfer Credit All graduate credits to be counted toward the satisfaction of the master’s degree requirements, including all transfer credits, must be approved by the student’s Supervisory Committee and the Dean of Graduate Studies. Prior course work is assessed in relation to its contribution to framing a research foundation for the degree. Each course accepted must be current and relevant in relation to the desired degree.

Not less than 50 percent of the course work required for any graduate degree must be completed at the University of Nebraska.

No graduate credits will be accepted as transfer credit toward a master’s program at UNL if the course work is 10 years or older or if the course work has been applied toward a previously completed master’s degree at any institution, including UNL. Professional courses may not be transferred toward a graduate degree.

Changes to Plan of Study Changes may be made to an approved Plan of Study (MOC). Once the student and the student’s supervisory committee agrees on the course change, the student’s faculty advisor emails the FDST Graduate Coordinator and Office of Graduate Studies master’s Programs Coordinator for final approval.

Mid-Program Comprehensive Exam – Research Proposal Defense A student pursuing a Master of Science Degree with Thesis must complete a mid-program comprehensive exam by the end of the student’s 3rd semester (or before completion of 20 credit hours). Students may not defend a research proposal and graduate in the same term.

The mid-program comprehensive exam consists of a research proposal on the student’s intended project. The proposal should be written by the student and then orally defend in front of the student’s Supervisory Committee. Areas to be evaluated include the student's knowledge of the science and methods to be used in the project and the student's ability to express their ideas orally and to answer questions related to the proposed project.

The Supervisory Committee Chair (faculty advisor) should be involved in planning and development of the research project but should not edit or rewrite the written research proposal. This document should be an accurate representation of the student's writing and reasoning abilities. Written Research Proposal Requirements Submit at least two weeks before the oral defense, email the written research proposal and evaluation form to supervisory committee members, FDST Graduate Chair and Graduate Program Coordinator

  • Written format as a grant proposal for USDA, NIH, or NSF
  • USDA: https://www.nifa.usda.gov/grants
  • NIH: https://grants.nih.gov/grants/about_grants.htm
  • NSF: https://www.nsf.gov/funding/preparing/
  • UNL Office of Research & Economic Development Checklists: https://research.unl.edu/sponsoredprograms/forms-templates/
  • Proposal length is recommended to be 6 to 7 pages

 Sections of a grant proposal can include, but are not limited to:

  • Project Summary or Abstract
  • Project Narrative or Description
  • Bibliography and References

Oral Research Proposal Defense Requirements

  • 20-minute seminar presentation with Supervisory Committee members
  • Followed by oral examination by the Supervisor Committee

The supervisory committee members will complete Research Defense Evaluation Forms to provide constructive feedback. The Supervisory Committee may recommend:

  • Unconditional approval of the research project proposal
  • Conditional approval (the committee may specify remedial action to improve writing skills, additional course work to improve knowledge in a technical area critical to the research, or other action as necessary)
  • Not approved: The student will be given a second opportunity to prepare and defend a revised proposal within six months.

Reporting Results

  • Copies of the Research Defense Evaluation Forms must be turned into the FDST Graduate Program Coordinator.
  • If a student fails to pass the research proposal, the supervisory committee files a report on the failure to the FDST Graduate Chair and FDST Graduate Coordinator. The report must indicate what the student must do before taking another examination. Another examination may not be held during the same term. Only two attempts are permitted unless additional attempts are approved by the FDST Graduate Committee.

Thesis and Final Oral Defense Please follow the Office of Graduate Studies (OGS) Steps to Completion in order to meet OGS deadlines. Keep in mind the anticipated graduation date. It takes 4-6 months to write a high-quality thesis. A publication is not required for graduation.

The master’s thesis and abstract must be submitted to the supervisory committee chair (faculty advisor). The faculty advisor should be involved in helping the graduate student develop their thesis into an acceptable form. Once approved, the Final Examination Report form must be submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies Masters Program Coordinator and FDST Graduate Program Coordinator at least four weeks prior to the oral defense. An electronic copy of the thesis and abstract must be submitted to all supervisory committee members, Office of Graduate Studies Masters Program Coordinator, and FDST Graduate Program Coordinator for approval at least two weeks prior to the oral defense. All major revisions to the thesis should be completed before the oral defense. Minor revisions (such formatting or spelling) are permitted after the oral defense. Written Requirements

  • Office of Graduate Studies Written Format Guidelines: https://www.unl.edu/gradstudies/current/degrees/guidelines
  •  Make revisions based on corrections and recommendations after each evaluation
  • Oral Defense
  • 45-minute public seminar presentation with 10 minutes for questions, open to faculty, graduate students, and guests
  • Followed by oral examination by the Supervisor Committee (please allow 2 hours)

Oral presentations are open to the public and must be advertised. In-person presentations in FIC 277 with a Zoom option for remote attendees is the preferred format.

The following information should be sent to the FDST Communication Support Associate at least two weeks before the oral presentation.

  • short biosketch, date, time, room, zoom link, advisors, presentation title, and headshot picture

Reporting Examination Results If the committee agrees unanimously that the student has passed: Part 4 of the Final Examination Report is signed by all committee members present for the defense.

  • If only one member dissents: The dissenting member files a letter of explanation to the FDST Graduate Chair, FDST Graduate Coordinator and the Office of Graduate Studies, but the student is approved for the degree and Part 4 of the Final Examination Report is signed accordingly.
  • If more than one member dissents: The student fails to pass the final oral exam. The committee files a report on the failure to the FDST Graduate Chair, FDST Graduate Coordinator and the Office of Graduate Studies, indicating what the student must do before attempting another examination. A student may attempt a final oral exam only once per term.

Passed Examination Once Part 4 and 5 of the Final Examination Report are signed by all committee members present for the defense, the Final Examination Report needs to be given to the student. It is the student’s responsibility to turn in the signed Final Examination Report and final draft of their Thesis to the Office of Graduate Studies Masters Program Coordinator to get approval to upload their thesis.

Master of Science Degree (MS), Option B, is an applied science program using current knowledge to develop practical applications culminating in a project. MS Option B is considered a professional, terminal degree. It is designed for students who do not intend to pursue a graduate degree beyond a master’s degree. Graduates of the MS Option B program may be hired as technologists and specialists in industry. MS Option B students may already be employed in the food industry seeking to expand their education and possibility of promotion. MS Option B students are expected to be self-funded and are not eligible for graduate assistantships. Length of Program If enrolled full-time, students typically complete the Master of Science Project in 1 ½-2 years. Students must complete their Master of Science degree within 5 consecutive years from their first term of admission. Supervisory Committee A student’s supervisory committee should be formed by the end of the student’s 2nd semester (or before completion of 15 credit hours). Requirements

  • Minimum of three committee members
  • Faculty advisor serves as chair
  • At least two committee members must be Food Science and Technology faculty. The third member may be from Food Science and Technology or another department.

Minor: Students seeking a minor are required to have a graduate faculty member from the minor program on their Supervisory Committee. It is at the discretion of the minor faculty advisor as to whether they elect to be on the student’s supervisory committee as long as a minor comprehensive exam is not required. UNL Full-time Employees

To reduce conflict of interest, University of Nebraska-Lincoln full-time (1.0 FTE) employees must identify a faculty advisor other than their immediate work supervisor. Their work supervisor may serve on their supervisory committee as a member. Plan of Study (Memorandum of Courses) A Plan of Study consists of courses considered necessary for the student’s degree. Plan of Study is intended to be flexible to meet the educational objectives of the student and to build on previous academic experiences. The student, along with the Supervisory Committee, should select courses that best support the student’s research and overall academic program. A student’s Plan of Study should be completed by the end of the student’s 2nd semester (or before completion of 15 credit hours). Students may not file a Memorandum of Courses and graduate in the same term. Requirements

  • At least one-half (15 hours), including project credits, must be in Food Science and Technology (FDST)
  • Minimum of 15 credit hours must be 800 or 900 level without 400-level counterparts (including FDST 897)
  • 4-6 hours of FDST 897 MS Project credit hours

Not less than 50 percent of the course work required for any graduate degree must be completed at the University of Nebraska. No graduate credits will be accepted as transfer credit toward a master’s program at UNL if the course work is 10 years or older or if the course work has been applied toward a previously completed master’s degree at any institution, including UNL. Professional courses may not be transferred toward a graduate degree. Changes to Plan of Study Changes may be made to an approved Plan of Study (MOC). Once the student and student’s faculty advisor agrees on the course change, the student’s faculty advisor emails the FDST Graduate Coordinator and Office of Graduate Studies Master’s Programs Coordinator for final approval. Mid-Program Comprehensive Exam – Project Proposal The Plan B project is done in lieu of a master thesis. The master’s project provides an opportunity for students to integrate and apply the knowledge acquired throughout their master program. The project culminates in a presentation of the project findings through a project defense and final written report. A student pursuing a Master of Science Degree with Project must submit a brief project description. The project description must be submitted to the Grad Committee with their Plan of Study by the end of the student’s 2nd semester as part of their annual progress report (or before completion of 15 credit hours). By their 3rd semester (or before completion of 20 credit) they should submit and present a complete project proposal to their supervisory committee to obtain feedback. The guidelines for the written project proposal can be obtained from the department. Students should send their proposal accompanied by the evaluation form found on this link to receive and document feedback from their supervisory committee. Students may not present a project proposal and graduate in the same term. Project Minimum Requirements The project serves as proof of the student’s understanding of theories and principles of Food Science and Technology, and their ability to apply that knowledge to solve a problem or fill in a knowledge gap related to some aspect of professional life. A master project would qualify as “suitable” if it provides students the opportunity to apply the skills and competencies acquired in the Food Science and Technology Master program to a problem/challenge/issue/knowledge gap likely to be encountered in professional practice.

The objective of the project is to evaluate the student’s abilities to:

  • Concisely define a problem/challenge/issue/knowledge gap
  • Discuss the problem/challenge/issue/knowledge gap within the context of practice and/or policy in USA or globally
  • Critically review research literature relevant to the topic
  • Propose an experimental design or solution to address the problem/ challenge/ issue/ knowledge gap
  • Describe the methodology proposed for the experimental design or solution
  • Explain findings in a style appropriate for practice or scholarly publication
  • Analyze and interpret findings and make appropriate conclusions and recommendations for policy/practice

Preparing the Project The project manuscript must document the research process and line of reasoning in a logical clear order that allows others to evaluate the credibility of the work. The content and presentation of the project should meet the criteria of either a journal article or technical report, depending on the nature of the research. Students should consult their faculty advisor(s) and supervisory committee about the writing style early in the process. The following is a guideline for the content of the project; however, the format may vary depending on the nature of the research (8-10 pages):

  • Title page and abstract
  • Introduction to the context: i.e., “why is this important? To you? Others?”
  • Goals and objectives of the project, clear statement of the topic or problem
  • Critical review of relevant literature (does not have to be a separate chapter like in a thesis)
  • Methods as appropriate to the form of the project
  • Results analysis and discussion
  • Implications and recommendations for application and/or policy

In the discussion section students are expected to integrate their findings with relevant literature, discuss the strengths and limitations of methods/approach/analysis and consider the implications of their work for practice. The guidelines for content of the final report can be found in the following link. Examples of previous final reports submitted by alumni of the MS option B program are available from the department. For style and format students may use as the Office of Graduate Studies Written Format Guidelines, please note not all sections of the thesis may apply to the final project report: https://www.unl.edu/gradstudies/current/degrees/guidelines. Project Examples The master’s project may take various forms, as long as it fulfills the minimum requirements and does not match or exceed the expectations of a master thesis . Some of those forms include but are not limited to the following examples:

  • Research or Technical Report
  • Involves the collection, analysis, and/or interpretation of data to address a food science or technology problem, report results on a client’s project or describe the development of a new product or process. The research report should include an abstract, report body, references, and appendix.
  • Primary Data Analysis
  • Work for the master’s project may also involve the primary collection and analysis of data, the experimental design should be well defined and delimited to one research objective. Data collection for the project is usually in the context of an ongoing study, but it is also possible (although not recommended) for students to initiate an original study under the guidance of a faculty member. The research may be published (not required) as part of a journal article or a technical note.
  • Secondary Data Analysis
  • Typically, a project research report is in the form of a secondary data analysis, using an existing data set. Please note that the appropriate ethics approval may need to be obtained for any paper that uses data gathered from human subjects. Even in cases where the data is de‐identified, a determination should be sought from UNL’s Internal Review Board. The research may be published (not required) as part of a journal article or a technical note.
  • Food Safety and Defense Program Development and Implementation
  • The project would involve the development of a HACCP, FSMA preventive control for human foods and food defense program plans to implement in a real food processing facility. The program should follow the guidelines and methodology stated by either USDA or FDA depending on the commodity in question, including a needs assessment and/or a risk assessment.
  • Policy Analysis
  • The project would involve analysis of the implications of a current or proposed policy or rule directly related to food safety, processing, or biotechnology. The project might include perspectives on food safety, processing, economics, and financing, need and demand, politics/ethics/law, or quality/effectiveness.
  • Project Proposal
  • The project would simulate either a grant proposal or a project business plan. The research question or business proposal must be related to food focusing in an area encountered in professional work, such as development of a new technology or investment on a new production line by a specific company.
  • The grant proposal would include a clear statement of the research question, the specific aims of the proposal, review of literature, study design, methods of analysis, implications, significance of the work and budget.
  • The project business plan would include a clear statement of the customer/consumer/company need, background of the company and rational of the project, project scope including measurable design goals, measurement methodology of goals, technical requirements and feasibility, market and cost analysis, and financial projections.
  • Curriculum or Training Development, Implementation and Outcome Evaluation
  • Involve the identification of a need, issue, or problem to be addressed using training and developing a curriculum guided by learning outcomes and tailored to a defined target audience. The developed curriculum would be then imparted to the identified target audience and evaluated for effectiveness at addressing the problem, need or issue identified. The process will be documented in a report outlining the relevance of the training, the development, implementation, outcomes, and recommendations.
  • Critical analysis of literature and practices (as an option for students with experience in an area of knowledge)
  • Review of literature should include either an analysis process (systematic review), or a constructive critique of the publications or methodologies to identify gaps or directions of the field. The final product should be in publishable format for outreach or scientific publication. Publication of the review is not required.

Project Final Paper and Oral Exam Please follow the Office of Graduate Studies (OGS) Steps to Completion in order to meet OGS deadlines. Keep in mind the anticipated graduation date. It takes 4-6 months to write a high-quality project paper. A publication is not required for graduation. The master’s project must be submitted to the supervisory committee chair (faculty advisor). The faculty advisor should be involved in helping the graduate student develop their project into a publishable form. Once approved, the Final Examination Report form must be submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies Masters Program Coordinator and FDST Graduate Program Coordinator at least four weeks prior to the oral exam. An electronic copy of the final project paper must be submitted to all supervisory committee members and FDST Graduate Program Coordinator for approval at least two weeks prior to the results deadline. Written Requirements

  • Written format as a journal article for publication or other professional type of document depending on the nature of the project
  • 15-20 double-spaced pages, not including references
  • 30-minute public seminar presentation with 5 minutes for questions, open to faculty, graduate students, and guests
  • Followed by oral examination by the Supervisor Committee (please allow 1 hour)

Please send the following information to the FDST Communication Support Associate at least two weeks before your oral presentation.

Reporting Examination Results

  • The committee members should complete the evaluation form provided by the department and email it to the Graduate Program Coordinator with the MS option B Coordinator in copy.
  • If the committee agrees unanimously that the student has passed: Part 4 of the Final Examination Report is signed by all committee members present for the exam.

Passed Examination Once Part 4 of the Final Examination Report are signed by all committee members present for the exam, a copy of the Final Examination Report needs to be given to the student. It is the student’s responsibility to turn in the Final Examination Report to the Office of Graduate Studies Masters Program Coordinator.

The Doctoral Degree consists of original research that contributes new knowledge. It is the terminal research degree in Food Science and Technology and designed to prepare students for careers in research. Successful doctoral students may pursue postdoc and faculty positions in college or university or be hired as scientists and researchers in industry and government agencies. Building on their education and work experience, doctoral students achieve senior, manager, and director positions throughout their career. The Doctoral Degree requires a dissertation. Students have the opportunity to prepare publications. Degree completion commitment by the student is required, through graduate assistantship funding offered by a faculty member within the Department of Food Science and Technology or another organization’s funding (e.g., government fellowships, employer sponsorship, etc.), other than personal funds. Students are strongly encouraged to complete a Master of Science degree before entering into a Doctoral Degree. Length of Program

  • If admitted with a Master of Science degree and enrolled full-time, students typically complete the doctoral degree in 3-4 years.
  • If admitted with a Bachelor of Science degree and enrolled full-time, students typically complete the doctoral degree in 5-6 years.
  • Students must complete their Doctoral degree within 8 consecutive years of submitting the Plan of Study (Program of Studies) to the Office of Graduate Studies.

Supervisory Committee A student’s supervisory committee should be formed by the end of the student’s 2nd semester (or before completion of 45 credit hours, including master’s degree credits). The Doctoral Degree Supervisory Committee form must be submitted with or before the Plan of Study form. Requirements

  • Minimum of four committee members. Five are recommended in the event one member is on sabbatical or is otherwise unavailable.
  • At least one committee member (outside representative) must be outside the Department of Food Science and Technology but within the University of Nebraska System (UNL, UNMC, UNO or UNK)

Minor: Students seeking a minor are required to have a graduate faculty member from the minor program on their Supervisory Committee. The minor faculty member may serve as the outside representative member. Readers: Two readers must be selected from the supervisory committee. The advisor (and co-advisor if applicable) cannot be designated as a reader. It is the readers’ responsibility to review and approve the dissertation prior to the Final Oral Examination. Special Member: A faculty member from another institution outside the University of Nebraska system may serve as a fifth or sixth committee member on the student’s committee. Special members may serve as readers and have voting rights for the student’s committee. Only one special member may serve per committee. A special member may not serve as an outside representative. Students need to submit the Appointment of Special Committee Member form and CV when they submit their Supervisory Committee form. UNL Full-time Employees To reduce conflict of interest, University of Nebraska-Lincoln full-time (1.0 FTE) employees must identify a faculty advisor other than their immediate work supervisor. Their work supervisor may serve on their supervisory committee as a member. Revisions Changes may be made to a Supervisory Committee any time prior to the submission of the Application for Final Oral Exam by submitting the Change of Supervisory Committee form to FDST Graduate Coordinator to be approved by FDST Departmental Grad Comm Chair, then by the Dean of Graduate Studies. University of Nebraska Faculty Employment Changes

  • If the student has achieved Candidacy, chair change:
  • The former chair who has left the University may continue to serve as co-chair
  • A second co-chair must be appointed
  • If the student has not achieved Candidacy, chair change:
  • A new chair of the Supervisory Committee must be appointed immediately
  • Graduate faculty with emeritus status may co-chair the supervisory committees of doctoral students or serve as a committee member.
  • If a member other than the chair leaves the employment of the University or retires, a replacement should be appointed.
  • Faculty granted adjunct faculty graduate status after leaving the University may serve as a committee member

Plan of Study (Program of Studies) A Plan of Study consists of courses considered necessary for the student’s degree. Plan of Study is intended to be flexible to meet the educational objectives of the student and to build on previous academic experiences. The student, along with the Supervisory Committee, should select courses that best support the student’s research and overall academic program. A student’s Program of Studies should be completed by the end of the student’s 2nd semester (or at least 45 credit hours remaining to be taken). If a Program of Studies is submitted with less than 45 credit hours left to take, it needs to include a memo from the Supervisory Committee Chair/faculty advisor to the OGS Doctoral Coordinator and FDST Graduate Coordinator acknowledging the tardiness of the submission and reasoning. Requirements

  • Minimum of 90 semester credit hours
  • At least one-half (45 hours), including dissertation credits, must be in Food Science and Technology (FDST)
  • 12-55 hours of FDST 999 Doctoral Dissertation credit hours
  • Minimum of 2 credit hours of FDST 896-002 Teaching Assistant
  • Minimum of 3 credit hours of FDST 951 Seminar if admitted with a master’s degree OR minimum of 4 hours if admitted with a bachelor’s degree
  • Minimum of 3 credit hours of FDST 952 Professional Communication if admitted with a master’s degree OR minimum of 4 hours if admitted with a bachelor’s degree

Transfer Credit All graduate credits to be counted toward the satisfaction of the doctoral degree requirements, including all transfer credits, must be approved by the student’s Supervisory Committee and the Dean of Graduate Studies. Prior course work is assessed in relation to its contribution to framing a research foundation for the degree. Each course accepted must be current and relevant to the desired degree. Not less than 50 percent of the course work required for any graduate degree must be completed at the University of Nebraska. No graduate credits will be accepted as transfer credit toward a doctoral program if the course work has been applied toward a previously completed doctoral degree at any institution, including UNL. Changes to Plan of Study Changes may be made to an approved Plan of Study (POS). Once the student and student’s faculty advisor agrees on the course change, the student’s faculty advisor emails the FDST Graduate Coordinator and Office of Graduate Studies Doctoral Programs Coordinator for final approval. Mid-Program Comprehensive Exam – Research Proposal Defense A student pursuing a Doctoral Degree must complete a mid-program comprehensive exam by the end of the student’s 4th semester (or at least 30 credit hours remaining to be taken). The mid-program comprehensive exam covers both the FDST major and any applicable minor. Students must defend a research proposal and submit the Application for Admission to Candidacy form at least 7 months before their intended graduation. The mid-program comprehensive exam consists of a research proposal on the student’s intended project that the student will write and then orally defend in front of the student’s Supervisory Committee. Areas to be evaluated include the student's knowledge of the science and methods to be used in the project and the student's ability to express their ideas orally and to answer questions related to the proposed project. The Supervisory Committee Chair (faculty advisor) should be involved in planning and development of the research project but should not edit or rewrite the written research proposal. This document should be an accurate representation of the student's writing and reasoning abilities. Written Research Proposal Requirements

  • Submit at least two weeks before the oral defense, email the written research proposal and evaluation form to supervisory committee members, FDST Graduate Chair and Graduate Program Coordinator

Sections of a grant proposal can include, but are not limited to:

  • Facilities and Equipment
  • Budget (encouraged, but not required)
  • 30-minute seminar presentation with Supervisory Committee members

Reporting Results and Admission to Candidacy

  • If a student fails to pass the research proposal, the supervisory committee files a report on the failure to the FDST Graduate Chair, FDST Graduate Coordinator and the Office of Graduate Studies. The report must indicate what the student must do before taking another examination. Another examination may not be held during the same term. Only two attempts are permitted unless additional attempts are approved by the FDST Graduate Committee.
  • Upon successful competition of mid-program comprehensive exam (research proposal defense), turn in the Application for Admission to Candidacy form into the FDST Graduate Coordinator

Doctoral students who have achieved candidacy status must be continually enrolled every fall and spring semester until they graduate. Failure to maintain enrollment will result in the termination from the Food Science and Technology graduate program. Dissertation and Final Oral Defense Please follow the Office of Graduate Studies (OGS) Steps to Completion in order to meet OGS deadlines. Keep in mind the anticipated graduation date. It takes 6 - 8 months to write a high-quality dissertation. A publication is not required for graduation. The dissertation and abstract must be submitted to the supervisory committee chair (faculty advisor). The faculty advisor should be involved in helping the graduate student develop their dissertation into a publishable form.  Once approved, the dissertation must be submitted to all supervisory committee members at least 4 weeks prior to the oral defense. All major revisions to the dissertation should be completed before submitting the Application for Final Oral Examination form and oral defense.  When the Application for Final Oral Examination form is signed by the two readers and supervisory committee chair (faculty advisor), the supervisory committee affirms that is ready to defend. Minor revisions (such formatting or spelling) are permitted after the oral defense. Once approved by the reading committee members, the Application for Final Oral Examination form, full dissertation and abstract must be submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies Doctoral Program Coordinator and FDST Graduate Program Coordinator at least two weeks prior to the oral defense. Written Requirements

  • Make revisions based on corrections and recommendations after each evaluation

Oral presentations are open to public and must be advertised. In-person presentations in FIC 277 with a Zoom option for remote attendees is the preferred format. Please send the following information to the FDST Communication Support Associate at least two weeks before your oral presentation.

  • If the committee agrees unanimously that the student has passed: A Report of Completion is signed by all committee members present for the defense.
  • If only one member dissents: The dissenting member files a letter of explanation to the FDST Graduate Chair, FDST Graduate Coordinator and the Office of Graduate Studies, but the student is approved for the degree and a Report of Completion is signed accordingly.

Passed Examination Once the Report of Completion is signed by all committee members present for the defense, the Report of Completion needs to be given to the student. It is the student’s responsibility to turn in the signed Report of Completion and final draft of their Dissertation to the Office of Graduate Studies Doctoral Program Coordinator to get approval to upload their Dissertation.

Adding a Minor The minor must be listed on the Plan of Study (MOC or POS). All courses taken for the minor must be listed on the Plan of Study and be signed by a minor department representative. Graduate students must consult with their faculty advisors to see if pursuing a minor is beneficial for their research, project or career path. Students seeking a minor should consult with the department issuing the minor to select appropriate courses, requiring a minimum of 9-15 credits. Before considering a minor, please consider that graduate school is already highly specialized, focuses on research experiences, and requires less course work than a bachelor’s degree. For a master’s degree, you only need to complete 20-24 credits of course work. For a doctoral degree, half of your credits (45 hours) will be in your research experience. Outside Minors Food Science and Technology graduate students pursuing a minor outside the Department of Food Science and Technology. Minors must be completed within a degree program. A minor may be taken in any one department or interdepartmental area that has been approved to offer a major leading to a master’s degree. Students seeking a minor should consult with the department issuing the minor to select appropriate courses. Students seeking a minor are required to have a graduate faculty member from the minor program on their Supervisory Committee. The comprehensive exam for the minor may be waived if all grades in the minor are at least a B or P (pass).

Office of Graduate Studies Guidelines:

  • Master’s Minor consists of a minimum of 9 credit hours in coursework
  • Doctoral Minor consists of a minimum of 15 credit hours in coursework; with 6 credit hours must be 800 or 900 level without 400-level counterparts

Food Science and Technology Minor Open to graduate students outside the Department of Food Science and Technology. Minors must be completed within a degree program. Requirements

  • A FDST departmental representative must be a member of the student’s Supervisory Committee
  • FDST courses must be taught by Food Science and Technology faculty members

The comprehensive exam for the minor may be waived if all grades in the minor are at least a B or P (pass). Courses taken to fulfill requirements for a graduate certificate and later applied toward a graduate degree must meet the minimum grade requirements for the degree, which may be higher. Repeatable Course Maximum Credit s FDST 951 Advanced Food Science and Technology Seminar (offered every fall semester)

FDST 952 Professional Food Science Communication (offered every spring semester)

Food Safety and Defense Certificate Chair, Dr. Byron Chaves The online Food Safety and Defense Graduate Certificate enables food industry professionals to pursue specialized in-depth training. Additionally, the Certificate can complement a graduate degree program. The online Food Safety and Defense Graduate Certificate is a multi-institutional program being offered as part of the Great Plains Interactive Distance Education Alliance (GPIDEA / AGIDEA) , in cooperation with the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Kansas State University, and the University of Missouri. Adding a Certificate A graduate certificate comprises a set of credit-bearing graduate courses representing a specific subject area. Graduate certificates are designed for post-baccalaureate students seeking to enhance their educational portfolio. Admission to and enrollment in a graduate certificate program occurs independently of graduate (master’s and doctoral) degree programs. Students interested in pursuing a certificate must fill out an application for admission into the certificate program through the Office of Graduate Studies. Certificates may be earned prior to or concurrently with a graduate degree. Certificate courses taken at the University of Nebraska that meet the minimum grade requirements may count toward a graduate degree. Courses taken and applied toward a previously awarded graduate degree or certificate cannot be counted toward a future graduate certificate. Courses completed at institutions other than the University of Nebraska cannot count toward a graduate certificate.

Tuition and Fees Current cost is $655.25 per 1 credit hour. The total program requires 13 hours for a total of $8,505.25. Graduate tuition and student fees are assessed by the credit hour and the program. Online students pay the online course fee, technology fee, and library fee. The Food Safety and Defense Certificate is not a degree program and may not qualify for federal student aid. If you have questions, please contact the Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid .

Minimum Grade Requirement A minimum grade of C is required. For coursework to count toward a Master of Science or Doctoral Degree in Food Science and Technology, the minimum grade is a B. Length of Program Generally, at least two courses are offered each Fall semester, Spring semester, and Summer term. Depending on the number of courses taken each semester/term, it can take 12-24 months to complete the Food Safety and Defense Certificate. Students must complete their Food Safety and Defense Certificate within 5 consecutive years. Great Plains IDEA Course Planner Course Requirements Required Core Courses (9 credit hours)

  • FDST 805 Food Microbiology (UNL) [college-level microbiology course highly recommended] (3 credit hours)
  • FDST 825 Food Toxicology (2 credit hours)
  • FDST 871 Multidisciplinary Overview of Food Safety and Security (2 credit hours)
  • FDST 872 Principles of Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point System (HACCP) (2 credit hours)

Elective Courses (select 3 credit hours)

  • FDST 855 Microbiology of Fermented Foods (2 credit hours)
  • FDST 877 Advanced Food Microbiology and Biotechnology (2 credit hours)
  • FDST 878 Food Protection and Defense: Essential Concepts (2 credit hours)

Student Resources While enrolled in courses for the Food Safety and Defense Certificate, you are considered an UNL student and have access to most student resources including to the online Library resources. Additional costs are charged to use the University Health Center and the Campus Recreation Centers. How to Enroll in Courses Always work with your faculty adviser, Dr. Byron Chaves, to help you plan your classes. The Office of the Registrar offers excellent Registration Tips and Techniques to help trouble shoot most problems. Fill out the online course request form: https://form.jotform.com/CASNR/GPIDEAregistrationform Receive a permission code from Melissa Sailors and register online MyRED. Application for Graduation – Certificate Completion In order to complete the certificate program, you must apply for graduation during the last semester you are enrolled in courses. Applications for Graduation may be submitted electronically via MyRED. Transfer Coursework to Graduate Degree Program Certificates may be earned prior to and concurrently with a graduate degree. Certificate courses taken at the University of Nebraska and that meet the minimum grade requirements may count toward a graduate degree. Courses taken and applied toward a previously awarded graduate degree or certificate cannot be counted toward a future graduate certificate. Courses completed at institutions other than the University of Nebraska cannot count toward a graduate certificate.

Currently enrolled students who wish to change their degree objective with Food Science and Technology must submit the following to the FDST Graduate Committee Chair and FDST Graduate Program Coordinator. Criteria to change degree programs are similar to those that would be considered for admissions for any student initially applying to the Food Science and Technology graduate program. Changing from MS Thesis to PhD

  • A letter of support for the change from their faculty advisor to Graduate Chair
  • If applicable, including their willingness to provide financial support
  • A brief statement explaining the request to change your degree and justification

Changing from PhD to MS Thesis

  • If a student has used full-time certification, they may not change their degree objective from thesis to project

Changing from MS Project to MS Thesis

  • Once a student has been accepted into the MS Project (option B) program, they cannot change to MS Thesis (option A).

Professionalism Graduate school is vastly different from undergraduate education. It is more than just taking more classes at a higher level. Graduate students join a community of scholars and are expected to contribute – even create new information to expand knowledge within the food science and technology discipline. Graduate students are treated as professionals, and responsible to develop and demonstrate their ability to be an independent scholar. Faculty advisors and graduate students need to work together to set expectations and essential commitments. Where problems in mentoring relationships occur, they are most often due to misunderstandings and lack of clear communication. Guidelines for Good Practice in Graduate Education Graduate students and faculty advisors should review the Guidelines for Good Practice in Graduate Education. The guidelines include graduate student role and faculty roles in professionalism/ethics, teaching, research, and advising/mentoring. Workload Graduate students are expected to master subjects and to devote substantial time to independent library or laboratory investigation. Additional time is associated with academic research leading to the successful completion of the student’s thesis, project or dissertation and includes scholarly work such as reading and synthesizing scientific literature, technical writing, laboratory work, data management, graphics and presentation preparation, and quantitative analyses. Graduate students are expected to network with fellow scholars by attending seminar presentations and regional and national professional meetings and conferences. There is no limit to time spent on studies and research relating to the advanced degree. All graduate students are expected to maintain daily working hours while conducting research or developing projects. Graduate students are responsible for keeping their faculty advisor informed of their status and how they may be reached. Undergraduate student holidays, semester breaks, and summers are not graduate student holidays. These periods provide an excellent opportunity for concentrated research or project. Graduate students are eligible for all University staff holidays (e.g., New Year’s Day, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving, and Christmas). Graduate assistants are required to work an average of 19.6 hours per week teaching or doing research for their faculty advisor, while being enrolled as a full-time student. This is in addition to course work and research for their thesis or dissertation. Their assistantship, thesis, and dissertation research activities, along with academic coursework, all constitute a full-time job. Time Management All graduate students are expected to manage time effectively for maximum professional development as well as personal health and well-being and balance competing demands such as being a student, graduate assistant, parent, spouse, caregiver, etc. Graduate school will go much faster than anticipated. Students are responsible for tracking their progress and deadlines. Graduate students should develop a work plan that includes both short-term and long-term objectives as well as a series of deadlines for completing each step.

  • The Individual Development Plan (IDP): Chart Your Course

Keep in mind the anticipated graduation date. It takes 4-8 months to write a high-quality thesis or project paper, or dissertation that could meet publication standards.

Project Development Students decide to work with a particular faculty advisor within a broadly defined area. The specific research or project problem within this area is usually suggested by the faculty advisor. This is appropriate in the beginning of a student’s graduate education since they may not have the experience to fully appreciate the proposed research or project problem in the context of the field. In attempting to solve the assigned research or project problem, the student will benefit from the ideas, expertise, and guidance of their faculty advisor. During the course of their graduate program, the student should become increasingly familiar with the subject of the investigation and, upon program completion, may well have greater expertise than their faculty advisor. It is assumed that the general research or project area in which the specific problem fits is one in which the faculty advisor will continue to work. It is to the mutual benefit of the student and faculty advisor to agree, before the student's departure, on the responsibilities for future work in the general research or project area. Full-time Industry Employees Often full-time industry employees have a specific research or project problem upon which they wish to work on. Industry employees need to work closely with their employer and faculty advisor to develop a project or research problem that can be shared through a written thesis, dissertation or project paper and oral presentation. It is to the mutual benefit of the student, employer, and faculty advisor to agree, before the student's departure, on the responsibilities for future work in the general research or project area. Safety and Research Responsibility Training Safety is the responsibility of every member of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln community. All students will receive the appropriate safety training prior to participating in research projects. Students need to work with their faculty advisors to determine what safety and research training is required. Certificates of completion must be kept on file. Refresher training may be required throughout a degree program. Safety Training The University of Nebraska-Lincoln Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) provides web-based training.

  • Core 1 - Injury and Illness Prevention Plan (IIPP)
  • Core 2 - Emergency Preparedness Training
  • Chemical Safety Training
  • Biosafety 100: Research Compliance
  • Bloodborne Pathogens for Laboratory Workers
  • Fire Extinguisher Training

Departmental Autoclaves To use and have access to the Food Innovation Center autoclaves, graduate students or faculty advisors need to contact Dr. Jayne Stratton, FDST Safety Committee Chair, to set up autoclave training.

  • EHS Autoclave Operation SOP
  • EHS Autoclave Operation Online Training

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) EHS Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Online Training Wear closed-toe shoes at all times where chemicals are stored or used. Do not wear sandals, open toed shoes, or flip-flops in laboratories. Shorts, cut-offs, skirts, and shorter pants such as carpi pants, pedal pushers and clam diggers are not appropriate when working in the lab. These offer no barrier between you and biological, chemical and physical hazards. Wear sturdy, supportive, slip-resistant shoes and long pants. Please follow your lab or pilot plant PPE protocols for eye, hand, head, and protective clothing protection. Standard prescription eyewear is not a substitute for safety eyewear. However, prescription eyewear can be designed to also serve as safety eyewear. Consult your supervisor if you need a need for prescription safety eyewear. Human Research Subjects The Institutional Review Board (IRB) oversees Human Research Protection Program (HRPP). Research staff, including graduate students, are required to complete CITI training if they have direct contact with human participants (e.g., for subject recruitment, data collection) or who have access to information that links participants’ names with their data. Research staff, including graduate students, who work with the non-identifiable data (e.g., data entry, data analysis) and who have no contact with participants AND no means of identifying participants or linking participants’ names to their data are not required to complete training. Animal Research Subjects Research staff, including graduate students, working with animals are required to complete Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) training through Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI) . Embargo Option The University of Nebraska-Lincoln offers three embargo options through ProQuest (for dissertations) and Digital Commons (for thesis): six months, one year, and two years. These options are available when the student uploads the PDF of the dissertation to ProQuest or the thesis to Digital Commons. The Process of Placing the Embargo Ownership of Data and Intellectual Property Research Materials and Data All data and records pertaining to the research activities are the property of the Department of Food Science and Technology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Research materials such as lab notebooks and research files shall remain the property of the faculty member(s) responsible for directing the project. The same applies to other items such as photographs, microscopic slides, specimens, models, and computer programs that might have been developed as a part of the graduate activities. Intellectual Property University of Nebraska Board of Regents (BOR) policy requires that, as employees of the University all faculty, staff, and some students, disclose and assign every invention or discovery resulting from the performance of duties within the scope of University employment, or from the use of University resources to the University. The University has three policies that govern intellectual property.

  • BOR Bylaw 3.10, establishes University ownership of inventions. When the Board of Regents established policy 3.10, the intent was to encourage the commercialization of inventions and discoveries arising from research activities of the University, and when appropriate, the pursuit of patents or other intellectual property protection.
  • BOR Policy 4.4.1, establishes the copyright policies for the various copyright works and development scenarios that can occur on campus.
  • BOR Policy 4.4.2, the patent and technology transfer policy, governs invention disclosure, intellectual property protection, and licensing. This policy outlines the steps that the University can take to protect its Intellectual Property and how the innovator can also benefit.

Ownership of Copyrights in Student Works Theses, Dissertations and Other Student Works Students will own the copyrights to their theses, dissertations, and other student works; however, a student must, as a condition to a degree award, grant royalty-free nonexclusive permission to the University to store copies of such works for archival purposes and to reproduce and publicly distribute copies of his or her thesis or dissertation within the University education and research missions; provided however, that should the student identify any legitimate proprietary interest the student may have in the work, or should the University determine that it has an ownership interest in any patentable or otherwise protectable Intellectual Property interest in the work, the University shall then delay any public access to the work for up to one year following the presentation of the work, in order for the student to consult with the University regarding the protection of the proprietary interest. Copyright ownership of theses or dissertations generated by research that is performed in whole or in part by a student with the support of a sponsor or grant shall be determined in accordance with the terms of the sponsored research or grant agreement, or in the absence of such terms, the copyright shall be owned by the University. Software, Patentable Subject Matter and Non-Copyright Intellectual Property Software, patentable subject matter, and other Intellectual Property contained or disclosed in theses, dissertations and other student works shall be subject to and governed by the policies that apply to University employees. Student Writings Other Than Theses or Dissertations Students shall own the copyrights to all student writings not commonly referred to as theses or dissertations and to other creative expressions required in the course of class assignments. The University shall retain the right to keep original examination scripts and to possess a copy or record of other student works for purposes of assigning grades, maintaining archival materials, and record keeping.

Suggested Courses The Food Science and Technology Graduate Committee recommend the following courses to help students prepare for research and writing. Students should work with their faculty advisor and supervisory committees to see if any of these courses would be beneficial in their Plan of Study.

  • FDST 866 Scientific Method in Practice (fall)
  • STAT 801A Statistical Methods in Research: Non-Calculus (fall, spring)
  • STAT 802 Design and Analysis of Research Studies
  • NRES 800 Sampling, Data Management and Visualization (fall)
  • AGRO 803 Scientific Writing and Communication (spring)
  • ASCI 896 Independent Study: Grant Writing for Life Science (spring)
  • NRES 891A Writing in Science (fall)

Academic Integrity Joining the Food Science and Technology graduate program means creating new knowledge to contribute to the food science and technology discipline. Graduate students will work with their faculty advisor and supervisory committee to create an independent research project. Evidence of academic integrity violations can result in a probation, termination or dismissal. Students dismissed from the University due to violations of the Student Code of Conduct are ineligible to reapply for graduate study at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Plagiarism “Presenting the work of another as one’s own (i.e., without proper acknowledgement of the source) and submitting examination, theses, reports, speeches, drawings, laboratory notes or other academic work in whole or in part as one’s own when such work has been prepared by another person or copied from another person. Materials covered by this prohibition include, but are not limited to, text, video, audio, images, photographs, websites, electronic and online materials, and other intellectual property.” [ UNL Student Code of Conduct ] Writing, Citations & Preventing Plagiarism Tools (UNL Libraries)

  • Citation Tools

Reporting Violations of Academic Integrity Faculty advisors and supervisory committees are required to report violations of academic integrity. Grant Writing Seminar The Office of Research and Economic Development offers an annual Write Winning Grant Proposals seminar each Spring semester. Participants able to select one of the seminar’s four workbooks, depending on the source from which they plan to seek funding: National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, U. S. Department of Agriculture, or a general version geared towards smaller funding agencies and foundations. UNL Libraries: FDST Research Guide There is an online guide to Libraries’ resources and services for Food Science & Technology Research Guide available at http://unl.libguides.com/foodscitech . (It also links to information from other reliable organizations and services.) Statistical Cross-disciplinary Collaboration and Consulting Lab (SC3L) The Statistical Cross-disciplinary Collaboration and Consulting Lab (SC3L) is a free service available to students, faculty, and staff at the University of Nebraska who are in need of assistance with a Master’s thesis, a PhD dissertation, or faculty research.

IANR Science Communication Hub Regardless of a chosen field or career path, students must communicate well when working in STEM. The IANR Science Communication Hub is dedicated to supporting IANR students, postdocs, and faculty to develop essential communication skills and reach their scientific writing and science communication goals. An IANR Graduate Student Science Communication Workshop is offered every September. Students may also sign up for the weekly writing group each semester. Writing Center All members of the UNL community (students, faculty, and staff) are welcome. All forms of communication are welcome, from lab reports, presentations, and research papers to cover letters, application essays, and graduate theses and dissertations. Writing Center Consultants can work at any stage of the writing process, from brainstorming and organizing ideas through polishing a final draft. Sign up for appointments by visiting the Writing Center website .

Probation Students on probation are not eligible for graduate assistantships. The funding will stop within one month of being placed on probation. Graduate students may be placed on probation by their supervisory committee with support from the Food Science and Technology Graduate Committee under the following conditions:

  • Failure complete Student Progress Report and meet at least once a year with supervisory committee, resulting in “Unsatisfactory”
  • Receiving “Unsatisfactory” on their Student Progress Report
  • Failure in qualifying examinations, preliminary examinations, comprehensive examinations, or final degree examinations
  • Failure to master the methodology and content of one’s field in a manner that is sufficient to complete a successful thesis or dissertation
  • Violations of the Student Code of Conduct
  • Violations of Academic Integrity

The faculty advisor or supervisory committee must submit a written six-month improvement plan to the FDST Graduate Committee. If the FDST Graduate Committee approves, the FDST Graduate Committee Chair must communicate it in writing to the Dean for Graduate Studies and the student. Termination Graduate students may be terminated by their supervisory committee with support from the Food Science and Technology Graduate Committee under the following condition:

  • Failure to satisfy conditions required for removal of probationary status

The faculty advisor or supervisory committee must submit a written recommendation for termination to FDST Graduate Committee. If the FDST Graduate Committee approves, the FDST Graduate Committee Chair must communicate it in writing to the Dean for Graduate Studies and the student. Appeal Procedure In all cases, appeals are made in writing to the appropriate advisor, committee, or council.

  • The initial appeal is to the student’s faculty advisor
  • If denied, the appeal may be submitted to the student’s supervisory committee
  • If denied, the appeal may be submitted to the Food Science and Technology Graduate Committee
  • If denied, an appeal may be made to the campus Graduate Council

The student's written initiation of the appeal must be filed within 30 days following the student’s receipt of the official written notification by Graduate Studies. Full Termination Appeals Procedures

Graduate tuition and student fees are assessed by the credit hour and the program. Estimated expenses are included at: Financial Resource Certification form Financial Aid Office’s Estimated Cost of Attendance

How to Enroll

  • Students should always work with their faculty adviser to help plan classes.
  • Students should use the FDST call number when registering for any cross-listed courses.
  • Students register for courses online through MyRED.
  • Registration for courses starts in March for summer term and fall semester courses, and in October for spring semester courses. The Office of the University Registrar’s Registration Dates should be followed to ensure enrollment is done in a timely manner and avoid late registration fees.
  • The Office of the Registrar offers excellent Registration Tips and Techniques to help trouble shoot most problems.

Permission Codes If a permission code is required for a course, students should first contact the instructor to request a permission code. Minimum Enrollment Requirements Graduate students should follow the minimum enrollment requirements set by their graduate assistantship, government funding guidelines, student visa status, educational loan deferment program, etc. Students with graduate assistantships are expected to be enrolled in full-time status. Graduate assistants are not required to register for courses during the summer term.

Maximum Registration Guidelines Graduate students who are employed (any type of employment, including GRAs and GTAs) are advised not to exceed the following registration guidelines established by the Graduate Council.

Full-Time Certification to Enroll in less than 9 hours Students may request full-time status certification to enroll in less than 9 credit hours. This is used toward the end of a student’s degree program allowing them to focus on their research and writing their thesis or dissertation. It saves money for both student and faculty advisor while completing their degree in a timely manner. First Step Enroll in courses for the term you plan to apply for full-time status certification. You must be enrolled in at least one credit hour before submitting the online form. Application Students must submit an online full-time status certification form every semester or term they are enrolled and need full time status while enrolling in less than 9 credit hours for fall and spring semesters and 6 credit hours in the summer term. Eligibility The student must be currently registered for at least one credit hour and have been registered at least half time (i.e., at least 4 credits) in the fall and spring terms prior to the initiation of the full-time certification status. Master of Science with Thesis (Option A) Students

  • Grad Studies approved Memorandum of Courses
  • Limitations: may use it no longer than 3 consecutive terms (including summer)

Doctoral Students

  • Grad Studies approved doctoral candidacy application
  • Limitations: may use it no longer than 24 consecutive months (or 6 consecutive terms, including summer)

Doctoral Students in Candidacy Doctoral students who have achieved candidacy status must be continually enrolled every fall and spring semester in at least 1 credit hour until they graduate. Failure to maintain enrollment will result in the termination from the Food Science and Technology graduate program. Special Consideration for International Students International students are highly encouraged to contact the International Student and Scholar Office (ISSO) if they have any questions about remaining in good standing. Fall and Spring

  • Register as a full-time student every Fall and Spring semester until they graduate.
  • No more than 3 credits or one class of online or distance education per semester may count towards the full-time enrollment requirement
  • If admitted in summer, international students must be enrolled full-time, or 6 credit hours.
  • If completing their degree in May, June, July or August, international students must be enrolled in a minimum of 1 hour for the summer. They should enroll in the session when they finish their oral examination.
  • If a student’s oral examination is completed in June, they should enroll in the 1st 5-week session.
  • If a student’s oral examination is completed in July, they should enroll in the 2nd 5-week session.
  • If not starting or finishing their program, international students are not required to register for courses during the summer term.

Special Consideration for Graduating Students Domestic Students without Graduate Assistantship

  • Not required to enroll in their last semester or term unless they need to finish coursework on their Plan of Study

Domestic Students with Graduate Assistantship

  • If graduating in the Fall or Spring semester: Must enroll in a minimum of 1 hour their last semester or term and submit a full-time certification request

International Students

  • Must enroll in a minimum of 1 hour their last semester or term to maintain their immigration status

International Students pursuing MS Project (Option B) If an international student is required to enroll full-time in their final semester, but they have less than 9 hours remaining. MS Project or self-funded international students have the option to submit Certification for Reduced Course Load form for their final semester. This form must be submitted and approved before their final semester. Academic Leave of Absence An Academic Leave of Absence can be used to suspend study for one semester up to a full academic year during which the student is not expected to make progress toward their degree. Students on leave of absence may not enroll in courses. Inactive Student Records If a student does not enroll in courses for three consecutive terms (without approved Academic Leave of Absence), their records will be inactivated. They must reapply for admission to enroll in courses and complete their degree or certificate. Withdrawal To withdraw from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the student should send a written notice to their faculty advisor, graduate program coordinator and the Office of Graduate Studies. The Office of Graduate Studies will discontinue their academic program. Please review the Office of the University Registrar’s policy on University Withdrawal and Cost of Withdrawal.

  • Only courses with 800 or 900 level course numbers can be counted for graduate credit.
  • Full course description are available online at https://catalog.unl.edu/graduate-professional/courses/

Food Science and Technology Courses

Great Plains Interactive Distance Education Alliance Great Plains Interactive Distance Education Alliance (GP*IDEA) is a partnership of public universities providing online educational programs and courses. The Department of Food Science and Technology participates with the Food Safety and Defense Certificate. Students interested in enrolling in these courses should

  • Fill out the online course request form: https://form.jotform.com/CASNR/GPIDEAregistrationform
  • Fill out the Student Acknowledgement Form
  • Fill out the Advisor Permission form which includes uploading your Plan of Studies
  • Receive a permission code from Melissa Sailors and register online MyRED.

University of Nebraska Intercampus Graduate students are eligible to take courses at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL), University of Nebraska Omaha (UNO), University of Nebraska at Kearney (UNK) and the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC). Food Science and Technology graduate students wishing to take courses at UNO, UNK or UNMC must fill out an Intercampus Application . A new application is required for each semester the graduate student wants to take a course at a different campus.

  • University of Nebraska Omaha Graduate Courses
  • University of Nebraska at Kearney Graduate Courses
  • University of Nebraska Medical Center Graduate Courses

Food Processing Center Workshops The Food Processing Center Workshops provide a variety of unique educational and training opportunities. Each program is designed specifically for the food manufacturing industry. Information is presented by industry and academic faculty experts. Graduate students are eligible to enroll in the following workshops and receive academic credit. Students must pay the FPC workshop fee and enroll in FDST 993.

Additional workshop options include the following. Each workshop requires registration and a fee.

  • Better Process Control School for Acidified Foods
  • Food Microbiology Workshop
  • FSMA Diagnostic Workshop
  • FSPCA Preventive Controls for Human Food
  • FSPCA Preventive Controls for Animal Food
  • National Food Entrepreneur Program

A digital badge is a microcredential indicating knowledge, skills, and competencies gained through various learning and professional development opportunities and can be displayed across various digital platforms such as social media and digital portfolios. A digital badge is a non-credit learning experience. JEDI Digital Badge The JEDI digital badge explores aspects of cultural awareness, openness, and identity that are foundational to concepts of justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion (JEDI). There is no cost for this digital badge. Food Allergen Fundamentals Digital Badge Food allergens remain a critical food safety concern for manufacturers throughout the food industry. Developing and implementing effective allergen control plans requires a robust understanding of foundational food allergen concepts. The FARRP Food Allergen Fundamentals digital badge is designed both for industry professionals new to a role with food allergen management responsibilities and for those wanting a refresher on core food allergen concepts. Cost: $50.

Publications and Presentations In addition to preparation of a thesis and/or dissertation, students are strongly encouraged to prepare manuscript(s) of their research results for publication and/or presentation at scientific meetings. The student will gain valuable experience from the efforts that go into publishing results and presenting scientific research. The student and faculty advisor work closely on such efforts. Office of Graduate Studies

  • On-Demand Professional Development Training (Canvas)

Teaching Development

  • Teaching Development Program (TDP)
  • Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching and Learning (CIRTL) Certificate Program
  • Preparing Future Faculty (PFF)

Improvement of Communication and Leadership Skills

  • Departmental Outreach Events
  • Food Science and Technology Research Symposium
  • UNL Research Days (poster presentations and slam)
  • Nebraska Union Toastmasters Club (a public speaking club)

Development of Professional Identity

  • Join professional associations and societies
  • Attend conferences and use these opportunities to network with others
  • Attend seminars offered by UNL departments
  • Pursue leadership opportunities through Graduate Student Assembly, Food Science Club, Phi Tau Sigma or other Recognized Student Organizations
  • Mentor undergraduate and junior graduate students

Internships The Food Science and Technology Graduate Program does not require an internship experience, or guarantee an internship placement. Students are responsible for finding their own internship opportunity. It is important for the student and faculty advisor to plan ahead together about a participation in an internship, especially with respect to the expected outcomes of the internship and balancing the internship with thesis/dissertation research activities. When an internship is determined, FDST 895 Graduate Internship Experience for 1 credit hour needs to be included on the Plan of Study. Careful planning and early inclusion of planned internship in the Plan of Study can minimize the possible delay in submission of necessary paperwork for graduation. Things to Know Graduate students on assistantships cannot participate in an internship as that puts their workload over the allowed hours for working. Students are not permitted to accept outside employment, unless approved by the student’s faculty advisor. If a graduate assistant accepts outside employment that is paid and full-time (40 hours per week), including internships, with approval from their faculty advisor, their assistantship ends based on their outside employment start date. International students will need to consider internships several months in advance of participation in them. Curricular Practical Training (CPT) approval is required prior to entering into an internship. According to the International Student Scholar Office, an essential component of CPT is that the internship must be an integral part of the student’s academic program for which the student must be enrolled in a course and gaining academic credit(s).

The Department of Food Science and Technology offers Graduate Research Assistantships (GRAs) and Graduate Teaching Assistantships (GTAs) to qualified students. Eligibility

  • Applicants for the Master of Science Degree with Thesis
  • Applicants for the Doctoral Degree

When a student applies to the Food Science and Technology Graduate Program, they are automatically considered for graduate assistantships. No additional forms are required. Students awarded graduate assistantships are expected to be fully committed to their academic program until graduation.

Appointments Graduate assistant appointments are made on an annual basis. Appointments are renewable if the student remains in good academic standing and continues to make satisfactory progress as determined by the student’s faculty advisor and supervisory committee. Outside Employment If a graduate assistant accepts outside employment, including internships, with approval from by their faculty advisor that is paid and full-time (40 hours per week), then their assistantship ends based on their outside employment start date. Hours Graduate assistants are required to work 19.6 hours per week (0.49 FTE) during the length of the appointment. Graduate teaching assistants (GTA) are expected to complete an Agreement of Duties form with their course instructor and/or the FDST Teaching Lab Manager at the beginning of each semester. Graduate research assistants (GRA) are highly encouraged to discuss expectations for research work with their supervisor each semester, including summer. Additional Hours Related to Academic Work The assistantship work hours are in addition to course work and research work for thesis or dissertation. There is no limit to time spent on studies and research relating to the advanced degree. Graduate students are expected to master subjects and to devote substantial time to independent library or laboratory investigation beyond the workload required of a graduate assistantship. The additional time is associated with academic research leading to the successful completion of the student’s thesis or dissertation and includes scholarly work such as reading and synthesizing scientific literature; technical writing; field or laboratory work or both; data management; graphics and presentation preparation; and quantitative analyses. Thesis and dissertation research activities, along with academic coursework, all constitute considerably more than a full-time job, and will contribute significantly to your professional development. Research Assistantship Responsibilities (GRA) Graduate Research Assistants are directly responsible to their faculty advisor offering the research assistantship. In addition to conducting their own research (FDST 899 or FDST 999), Graduate Research Assistants are expected to assist their faculty advisor with research projects other than their own, special and extension projects, to train other students, and to perform other relevant academic duties. Graduate Research Assistants are expected to pursue an academic area and conduct research consistent with the mutual interests of the student and one’s faculty advisor offering the research assistantship. This combined effort results in a thesis or dissertation for the student, the completion of grant objectives for the faculty advisor, and manuscripts published in scientific journals jointly authored by the student and faculty advisor. Teaching Assistantship Responsibilities (GTA) Your teaching assistantship supervisor is the Department Head. The Lab Manager in collaboration with the course instructors and the Department Head will oversee and direct your day-to-day duties. Teaching assistants are expected to start at least one week before classes begins through one week after final exams. Graduate teaching assistants are expected to assist with two courses or sections per week. This includes time outside the course to attend lab safety training, attend weekly preparatory meetings scheduled by the supervising course instructor and Lab Manager, prepare laboratory media and course materials including setting up and cleaning up lab materials and equipment, grade papers as well as in-class activities including proctor exams, work with students in laboratory or lecture exercises and answer students’ questions, and preparing and delivering lectures or lab presentations. International students are required to complete ITA (Institute for International Teaching Assistants) unless they earned a degree from an U.S. university or college.

Holidays and Leave Graduate assistantships are eligible for all University staff holidays (e.g., New Year’s Day, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving, and Christmas). Undergraduate student holidays and semester breaks are not graduate student holidays. The University does not offer vacation benefits for graduate assistantships. All vacations and leave must be planned in advance and approval obtained from the student’s work advisor. Benefits Eligibility

  • The assistantship appointment must be continuous for 4 full months (or at least 120 days) within the semester.
  • Graduate assistants must be admitted to a degree program and be registered full-time of at least 9 credit hours (maximum 12) or have full-term certification for the duration of their appointment.
  • Graduate assistantships are annually renewable based on satisfactory performance.

Stipend Graduate assistantships include a 12-month stipend, paid out in twelve monthly payments. Tuition Graduate assistants are eligible for tuition remission of up to 12 hours per semester work during the academic semesters plus 6-12 hours during the summer. Student Health Insurance Graduate assistantships include basic individual student health insurance coverage at reduced cost to the student. The University covers 79% of the student health insurance premium. The student health insurance plan covers accidents and illnesses to a maximum of $250,000 per policy year. Graduate assistants and international students will be automatically enrolled and billed for the University’s health insurance each semester. International students with "F" or "J" visas registered for classes at UNL are always required to have health insurance coverage unless proof of insurance from an outside source is provided. Once the Office of Student Accounts has generated your semester bill, you must accept, opt out, or waive health insurance coverage. This must be done every semester. Even though you are auto-enrolled, you still need to accept the insurance to complete the process and obtain your insurance cards for use at pharmacies and healthcare providers. Instructions to accept, opt out, or waive coverage can be found at https://studentaccounts.unl.edu/student-health-insurance . Student Fees Graduate assistants are responsible for ALL student fees (approximately $1,200 per semester) plus the student portion (approximately $500 per semester) of the University health insurance premium. The fee amount will vary depending on which courses are taken. Student fees include access to the UNL library, campus recreation and student health center. Tax Information Graduate assistantship stipends are taxable income. Graduate assistants are not required to register for courses during the summer term. However, if you are employed in the summer but not registered for courses, you will be subject to FICA and Medicare taxes (currently 7.65% of your salary). To be exempt from FICA and Medicare withholding, graduate assistants must be enrolled for at least 4 or more credit hours or have full-time certification in each academic semester, including summer. UNL Payroll Tax Withholding Free Tax Returns Preparation Assistance

Resignation or Termination

  • If a graduate assistant decides to resign from the assistantship, they must give a 30 days’ written notice.
  • If a graduate assistantship is terminated, the graduate assistant will receive a 30 days’ written notice.

If a student resigns or the assistantship is terminated from the assistantship before completing four full months (or 120 continuous days) of employment in the semester, all tuition and health benefits will be forfeited. The student will be held responsible for the entire cost of those benefits, retroactive to the beginning of the semester, which will post to their student account.

Fellowships

  • Victor W. Henningsen, Sr. Graduate Student Fellowship
  • Twila Herman Claybaugh Graduate Student Fellowship
  • Agricultural Research Division Fellowships
  • College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Fellowships
  • Office of Graduate Studies Fellowships

Travel Grants

  • IANR Larrick Graduate Student Travel Grant
  • Graduate Student Assembly Travel Award
  • Office of Graduate Studies Travel Grant

Outside UNL Fellowships

  • Office of Research and Economic Development Funding Opportunities
  • NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP)
  • NIH Predoctoral Training
  • USDA Food and Agricultural Sciences National Needs Graduate and Postgraduate Fellowship Grants Program (NNF)
  • USDA-FSIS Graduate Student Food Safety Fellowship
  • FARR Fellow (Future Leaders for Food and Agriculture)

Office Space Graduate students enrolled full-time may be provided with a desk and office area. It is necessary that graduate students share an office with other graduate students and research staff. Graduate students are assigned offices based on their faculty advisor. Graduate students are responsible for maintaining offices, laboratories, and facilities in the Department in an orderly and presentable condition at all times. Offices are not to be used for laboratory experiments or storage of equipment and/or sample materials. Mailboxes Each graduate student office has a designated mailbox in FIC 225.

Holistic Application Review Because each applicant’s background and experience is unique, the Department of Food Science and Technology take a comprehensive approach evaluating the applicant as a whole individual. Applicants need to follow the directions when submitting their application. Competitive Our program is extremely competitive. We only accept 20 students or 20% of all applicants who apply each year. Advisors and funding are limited, and not guaranteed to all applicants. Finding a Faculty Advisor Applicants are not automatically assigned an advisor. After submitting their application , applicants should begin contacting potential faculty advisors with shared research interests to discuss their background and why they are interested in working with them. To be fully admitted, applicants must have faculty willing to accept them and serve as their faculty advisor. The Office of Graduate Studies and Department of Food Science and Technology require each prospective student to have a faculty member to serve as your advisor to be fully admitted in our graduate program. You are not admitted into the graduate program until you receive an offer of admission from the Office of Graduate Studies. If an applicant is unable to find an advisor, the applicant is denied for lack of an advisor. Unfortunately, faculty do not notify the Graduate Program Coordinator when they are seeking students. A list of admissible students is sent to graduate faculty members every few weeks. Successful applicants:

  • Take the time and explore our faculty profiles and read their published papers
  • Care deeply about a well-defined interest within one of our primary areas of research
  • Only contact faculty advisors with similar research interests.

Financial Support Graduate Assistantship Applicants for the Master of Science Degree with Thesis and Doctoral Degree are eligible for graduate assistantships. Graduate assistants are required to work 19.6 hours per week (0.49 FTE). Graduate assistantships include a monthly stipend, tuition waiver, and 79% of the University health insurance premium. No additional forms are required to be considered for graduate assistantship. Graduate assistantships are extremely competitive. To be eligible for graduate assistantships, applicants must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 (on 4.0 scale) or B average. Graduate assistantships are extremely competitive. Graduate assistantships are dependent on available funding and an open position in a faculty advisor’s lab. Most funding come from outside funding agency grants. When a grant is approved, the faculty advisor searches for a well-qualified applicant to work on a specific research project. There is no separate application to be completed for assistantships, or list of current advisee openings or faculty with funding, as these vary according to term and faculty member. Full-time Employees Applicants who plan to be full-time employees are not eligible for graduate assistantships. Often full-time employees receive tuition benefits through their employers.

Governmental and Outside Funding Examples of governmental and/ or outside funding include, but not limited to Fulbright, Chinese Scholar Council, King Saud University Scholarship or NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. Please upload the fellowship or scholarship agreement to your application. For MS Project Only - No Financial Support If a faculty member offers to advise an applicant without financial support and the applicant agrees to those terms, the applicant must not expect that graduate program funding will become available to the applicant at some later date. Instead, the applicant should seek to secure independent funding for the full duration of your graduate studies. Students interested in pursuing a Master of Science Degree with Project option must be willing and able to be self-funded. Tuition and Student Fees Graduate tuition and student fees are assessed by the credit hour and the program. Estimated expenses can be found at: Financial Resource Certification form Financial Aid Office’s Estimated Cost of Attendance

Online Admission Application The University of Nebraska-Lincoln uses an online application . If applicants do not have a CollegeNET account, they will need to “Create a New Account.” Once you set up your account, you may log in to check your application status. Revising Admission Application You may make changes to your application and materials until you submit your application through CollegeNET. Once submitted, you may update your reference information and resend reference letter requests. If you want to update your personal statement or resume/CV, you will need to email [email protected] and make a special request. Application Fee All applicants must submit a nonrefundable application fee to the University before their application is processed. While we understand the economic issues around the world, the UNL Food Science and Technology Department does not waive the application fee.

  • $50 – All applicants not currently enrolled at UNL
  • $25 – Currently enrolled UNL students (graduate and undergraduate)

Transcripts Applicants must upload one unofficial transcript from each college or university attended to their application. Transcripts must include the student’s name, school name, courses completed, marks earned, and degrees conferred. For academic records in a language other than English, both the original-language documents and a certified word-for-word English translation must be uploaded along with certificates and diplomas. Official transcripts are required if admission is offered and accepted so newly admitted students can enroll. Minimum Academic Requirement: 4-Year Bachelor’s Degree A four-year U.S. bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited college or university or an equivalent degree as evaluated by the Office of Graduate Studies. The minimum requirement for admission to a University of Nebraska-Lincoln graduate program is 16 years of study. This is usually 12 years of elementary and secondary education plus four years of post-secondary study at an accredited college or university. Applicants must have reached an academic level equivalent to a U.S. bachelor's degree. Students with only three years of post-secondary education are not eligible for admission. In such cases, students may become eligible with:

  • a master’s degree (or higher) from an accredited higher education institution
  • an approved postgraduate diploma from an accredited higher education institution
  • one additional year upper-level coursework from an accredited higher education institution

Expected Academic Background Experience Transcripts are evaluated for course work and outstanding grades in biology, microbiology, chemistry, organic chemistry, physics, and calculus. Successful applicants have a bachelor’s degree or higher degree with a background in food science, microbiology, biochemistry, engineering, nutrition, biology, chemistry, animal science or another closely related field. To be eligible for graduate assistantships, applicants must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 (on 4.0 scale) or B average. Professional Development Supplemental Form Applicants are required to fill out the Professional Development Supplemental Form for their respective Master of Science or Doctoral degree application. Applicants are asked to identify their career goals, list research experience outside of the classroom and teaching experience, and identify two interests within food science and technology. PhD Expected Research Background Experience It is expected that applicants for the doctoral degree program have prior independent research experience outside of the classroom and submit a superior letter of recommendation from their research advisor. Applicants with a bachelor’s degree or MS non-thesis or course-based degree will be competing against applicants with MS thesis or research-based degrees. If you do not have independent academic research experience outside of the classroom, we highly encourage you to apply for the Master of Science Degree with Thesis option to gain experience and ensure original research is right for you. Once you complete your master’s degree, you have the option to apply for the PhD degree. Letters of Recommendation Letters of recommendation provide critical information about personal attributes and student motivation. Applicants should choose three recommenders who are able to evaluate their academic and research experience, work ethic, initiative, and critical thinking skills as it relates to graduate school. Recommenders should be research advisors, faculty members, instructors, internship supervisors, or colleagues from food science and technology or closely related fields, industry, student groups, or competitions. Recommendations should never come from a family member or close friend. Applicants may submit their admission application before receiving all the letters of recommendation. It is highly encouraged that letters be received by the deadline. Personal Statement In two pages or less, include a description of (1) your motivation for pursuing a graduate degree in Food Science, (2) your relevant experiences (research, teaching, internships/work, volunteering) that have prepared you for graduate school, and (3) what you want to gain during graduate school. Where appropriate, please include examples of your ability to overcome obstacles, your initiative, and communication skills. Although you do not need to identify an advisor to apply, please also indicate if there are specific faculty members you are interested in working with and why. Students interested in the Master of Science Degree-Project Option should clearly state in the personal statement that they are interested in the project option. Resume or Curriculum Vitae Successful applicants show their initiative outside the classroom. Be sure to include prior educational, research, teaching, internship/work, and volunteer experiences. Applicants are also encouraged to include information about awards, publications, and presentations and highlight any extra-curricular and/or leadership activities.

Publications and Awards Applicants are not required to have publications in order to apply for our graduate program. If you do have publications, presentation abstracts or documentation of special recognitions or awards, you may upload files or provide a URL on the “Additional Information Page” of the online application. Students who have completed thesis or project papers are encouraged to upload it to their application as evidence of your previous success in critical thinking. Only use the “Additional Information Page” of the online application to provide uploads or URLs. Do not duplicate information listed on resume/CV or documents uploaded elsewhere on the application. GRE Standardized Test Not Required As of November 2019, we no longer require GRE scores as part of our application. English Proficiency Verification Applicants whose native language is not English must submit TOEFL or IELTS test scores to demonstrate their ability to undertake advanced academic work in an English-speaking institution by providing an English Proficiency test score . Exemptions for the English proficiency requirement are granted for non-native speakers who have received a bachelor's or more advanced degree either from an accredited U.S. institution or from a university outside the U.S. at which English is the official language of instruction. Applicants must upload a self-report to their application if they have taken an English proficiency exam, then their official scores are received by UNL Office of Graduate Studies. This is an UNL Office of Graduate Studies requirement, and they evaluate test scores and exemptions. Questions may be sent to [email protected] .

Review Process The application review process has two steps. The Office of Graduate Studies reviews the application, followed by the Food Safety and Defense Certificate Chair. You are not admitted into the graduate certificate program until you receive an offer of admission from the Office of Graduate Studies. Financial Support No Financial Support An applicant is accepted without financial support. The applicant should seek to secure independent funding for the full duration of their graduate certificate. The Food Safety and Defense Certificate is not a degree program and may not qualify for federal student aid. If you have questions, please contact the Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid . Full-time Employees Oftentimes, full-time employees receive tuition benefits through their employers.

Admission Requirements for Graduate Certificate

Online Admission Application The University of Nebraska-Lincoln uses an online application . If applicants do not have a CollegeNET account, they will need to “Create a New Account.” Once you set up your account, you may log in to check your application status. Application Fee All applicants must submit a nonrefundable application fee to the University before their application is processed. The UNL Food Science and Technology Department does not waive the application fee.

One Letter of Recommendation Letters of recommendation provide critical information about personal attributes and student motivation. Applicants should choose at least one recommender who are able to evaluate their experience, work ethic, initiative, and critical thinking skills. Applicants may submit their admission application before receiving the letter of recommendation. It is highly encouraged that the letter be received within two weeks of the deadline. Personal Statement The personal statement should consist of 1 page and include your professional goals and how enrolling in this program will assist you in meeting your professional goals. Resume or Curriculum Vitae Successful applicants show their initiative outside the classroom. Be sure to include prior educational, research, teaching, internship/work, and volunteer experiences. Applicants are also encouraged to include information about awards, publications, and presentations and highlight any extra-curricular and/or leadership activities.

English Proficiency Verification Applicants whose native language is not English must submit TOEFL or IELTS test scores to demonstrate their ability to undertake advanced academic work in an English-speaking institution by providing an English Proficiency test score. Exemptions for the English proficiency requirement are granted for non-native speakers who have received a bachelor's or an advanced degree either from an accredited U.S. institution or from a university outside the U.S. at which English is the official language of instruction. Applicants must upload a self-report to their application if they have taken an English proficiency exam, then their official scores are received by UNL Office of Graduate Studies.

College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Strategic Framework The Strategic Framework for Graduate Education was written to determine the vision for the IANR graduate education, push the boundaries of traditional academic education, and provide students with an educational experience that prepares them to be the next generation of leaders, scientists, educators, innovators, and entrepreneurs. Vision Statement

  • Every graduate student is inspired and empowered to make a difference in a complex and diverse world
  • Individualized student experience for personal goals and professional growth of our graduate students
  • Holistic approach that Integrates curriculum, research and discovery, experiential learning, and professional development that prepares students to pursue opportunities and solve challenges In Nebraska and beyond
  • Diverse experiences with and beyond the university community that develop global and inclusive mindset/perspective

Departmental Graduate Committee The mission of the Food Science and Technology Graduate Committee is to develop and maintain excellence in the departmental graduate program. Membership and Selection

  • Consists of five Food Science and Technology graduate faculty members appointed by the Department Head.
  • The chair of the Graduate Committee is appointed by the Dean of Graduate Studies upon the recommendation of the Department Head.

Responsibilities

  • Suggest and modify graduate admissions and degree requirements for departmental graduate faculty approval
  • Evaluate applications and recommend acceptance into the graduate program
  • Monitor graduate student academic performance and progress
  • Address academic issues and student concerns including the oversight of student appeals
  • Identify and advance new curricula
  • Update the FDST Graduate Handbook and website on policy and procedure changes

Chair Responsibilities

  • Lead graduate committee activities
  • Assure fair and consistent compliance with all Graduate College and UNL policies that govern graduate education
  • Approve student paperwork, like Supervisory Committees and Plans of Study
  • Assign teaching assistant experience in collaboration with the Teaching Laboratory Manager and Department Head

Faculty Advisor Each graduate student must have at least one faculty advisor from the Department of Food Science and Technology. Students can also be co-advised by two faculty, one of whom must be from the Department of Food Science and Technology. Faculty Advisor Responsibilities

  • Advise the graduate student regarding course work and general academic requirements
  • Guide and monitor the graduate student’s progress throughout their program
  • Serve as the chair of the student’s supervisory committee
  • Provides counsel to the student if problems arise during their program
  • Conduct the student’s mid-program Comprehensive and Final Oral examinations with supervisory committee

A faculty member has the right to decline supervision of research or project by any graduate student, regardless of the origin of the research problem. UNL Full-time Employee Graduate Students To reduce conflict of interest, University of Nebraska-Lincoln full-time employees must identify a Food Science and Technology faculty advisor other than their immediate University of Nebraska-Lincoln work supervisor. Their University of Nebraska-Lincoln work supervisor may serve on their supervisory committee as a committee member. Faculty Submitting Grades for FDST 897, FDST 899, and FDST 999 Each faculty advisor has their own section of FDST 897, FDST 899, and FDST 999 and is responsible for entering grades.

  • P is for Pass
  • NP is for No Pass (lack of progress)
  • IP is for In Progress

Office of University Registrar (OUR) Submitting Grades Guidelines and Tutorials: https://registrar.unl.edu/faculty- staff/submitting-grades/ Change of Grades

Before the Final Semester If a faculty advisor does not enter a grade, NR (No Report) will show up on a student’s transcript. The faculty may request a change of grade by emailing the Office of the University of Registrar (OUR) at [email protected] . The email request must include the student’s name, student’s NU ID, term, course number, course title and SIS/Course ID. Final Semester Students who have applied for graduation and have outstanding grades (IP or NR) for FDST 899 or FDST 999 need their final grades entered. The faculty advisor enters grades using Thesis/Dissertation Grade Change . After the faculty advisor opens the link, select the advisee’s name from the dropdown menu. After choosing the advisee, the outstanding grades will appear. Enter the new grade of P and submit. You will receive a confirmation message. The grade change will be processed overnight, and an email notification will be sent to the student.

Supervisory Committee The primary function of the Supervisory Committee is to assist the student in developing an individualized plan , including academic coursework and professional development opportunities, that is compatible with the student’s career goals. The Supervisory Committee also ensures the student has reached a satisfactory level of academic achievement. Supervisory Committee Responsibilities

  • Monitor the progress of the student through annual reviews
  • Provide counsel to the student if problems arise during their program
  • Approve the student’s Plan of Study (academic coursework required to graduate)
  • Conducts the mid-program Comprehensive and Final Oral examinations

Graduate Faculty Status Faculty must have Graduate Faculty status to work with graduate students. Faculty holding tenure-track positions are automatically appointed as Graduate Faculty at the time of hire. Faculty members in non-tenure leading positions, including professors of practice, research professors, and adjunct faculty, must be nominated for appointment to the Graduate Faculty. Graduate Faculty Status (full) Graduate Faculty may teach graduate courses, serve on final examining committees, and serve on supervisory committees for both master and doctoral students. They may vote on any matter presented to the Graduate Faculty. Graduate Faculty status lasts for the duration of the faculty member’s appointment with the University. Graduate Faculty Associate Status Graduate Faculty Associates may teach graduate courses, direct masters theses, serve on or chair masters examining committees, and serve on doctoral supervisory committees for a four year term. Associate appointments may be renewed for additional terms(s) of four years. Emeriti Graduate Faculty Status Upon the recommendation of the departmental/school or interdepartmental Graduate Committee retired Graduate Faculty who have been appointed to emeritus status may retain the rights and privileges associated with their status as Graduate Faculty. These rights and privileges include permission to teach graduate courses, to serve as members of graduate programs, or to co-chair the supervisory committees of doctoral students with a resident Graduate Faculty member. Adjunct Graduate Faculty Status Upon recommendation of the departmental/school or interdepartmental Graduate Committee, Adjunct Faculty previously holding Graduate Faculty status while employed by the University of Nebraska, may retain certain rights and privileges intended to aid in successful degree completion of University of Nebraska students previously under their formal mentorship for a four year term. Adjunct appointments may be renewed for additional terms(s) of four years. Adjunct Faculty have no campus wide or Graduate College voting privileges outside their supervisory committee work. Graduate Lecturers Graduate Lecturers are non-tenure track faculty who are nominated and appointed to serve in a limited capacity. Graduate Lecturers may teach graduate courses, serve as academic advisors, and supervise students in graduate-level courses related to professional training such as clinical, field experience, practicum, internship and laboratory courses. Graduate Faculty Departmental Participation Graduate faculty are highly encouraged to be actively engaged in graduate education and program development. Examples include: Fall Department of Food Science and Technology Seminar Series

  • Present a seminar
  • Invite and host an outside speaker
  • Regularly attend seminar

Spring Food Science and Technology Research Symposium

  • Mentor trainees in the development of their presentations
  • Serve as an events judge
  • Attend and support student presentations
  • Teach or co-teach graduate-level FDST courses
  • Advise and mentor Food Science and Technology master or doctoral students
  • Serve on supervisory committees for Food Science and Technology master or doctoral students
  • Contribute to writing a successful grant to support a Food Science and Technology graduate student
  • Regularly attend Food Science and Technology faculty meetings and vote on graduate program issues
  • Serve on the Food Science and Technology Graduate Program Committee
  • Serve on the UNL Graduate Council

/images/cornell/logo35pt_cornell_white.svg" alt="phd thesis in food science and technology"> Cornell University --> Graduate School

Food science and technology ph.d. (ithaca), field of study.

Food Science and Technology

Program Description

Candidates for the Ph.D. degree select one major in the field and two minors outside the field. There are no general course credit requirements for the Ph.D. degree. Ph.D. degree candidates must make at least one research seminar presentation prior to graduation and are required to assist with the teaching program for at least one semester. In addition to the examinations required by the Graduate School, a qualifying examination is required of the Ph.D. degree candidates before the start of their second semester of residence.

Excellent opportunities for graduate study in both basic and applied research are available. All course work is done on the Ithaca campus, but students may conduct their research at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station at Geneva as well as on the Ithaca campus.

Contact Information

M10D Stocking Hall Cornell University Ithaca, NY  14853

Concentrations by Subject

  • dairy science
  • food chemistry
  • food engineering
  • food microbiology
  • food processing waste technology
  • food science [general]
  • international food science
  • sensory evaluation

Visit the Graduate School's Tuition Rates page.

Application Requirements and Deadlines

Fall, Dec. 1

(Food Science will not be admitting students for Spring 2024.)

Requirements Summary:

  • All Graduate School Requirements , including the  English Language Proficiency Requirement  for all applicants
  • 2-3 recommendations
  • A current resume

Learning Outcomes

  • Conduct original, publishable research in the field.
  • Demonstrate a broad knowledge of theory and research across several sub-disciplines in the field.
  • Demonstrate in-depth knowledge of one area of expertise.
  • Follow ethical guidelines for work in the field.
  • Write and speak effectively to professional and lay audiences about issues in the field.
  • For those entering teaching: grade and comment effectively on undergraduate student work, lead discussion and recitation effectively for undergraduates, demonstrate familiarity with the literature on learning and pedagogy, write a thoughtful teaching philosophy, and plan an effective undergraduate course in the field.

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Department of Food Science

Food technology.

phd thesis in food science and technology

Barley proteins for human consumption

This project will investigate the protein profile using protein chemical and proteomics techniques of different barley cultivars to identify how this influences its use for human consumption

phd thesis in food science and technology

Structuring plant proteins in extruder cooling dies for the scalable mimicry of meat analogues

Engineering of animal whole muscle tissue using plant protein melts

phd thesis in food science and technology

Extraction, characterization and stability of natural colorants from alfalfa and seaweed

Improving stability of colorants from green and blue biomasses

phd thesis in food science and technology

High quality protein from lucerne (alfalfa) - biorefinery project

Sustainable proteins, protein quality

phd thesis in food science and technology

Better bound: understanding the fate of non-covalently bounds polyphenols during human digestion

Better bound!

phd thesis in food science and technology

Nutritional value and functional properties of Faba beans

Faba beans are valuable food ingredient in a growing number of products, which calls for increasing insight into the nutritional quality and functional properties 

phd thesis in food science and technology

Diglyceride removal in vegetable oil

Investigation of process conditions and efficiencies for adsorption and enzymatic hydrolysis of diglycerides in vegetable oils

phd thesis in food science and technology

Technological improvement of dietary pea starch

Future-proofing dietary pea starch

phd thesis in food science and technology

Development of Serum-free media for cultivated meat

Work with a sustainable meat production of the future. Can you develop serum-free media for cultivated meat production?

phd thesis in food science and technology

Food colloids and interfaces

The behaviour of a droplet is driven by its interface

phd thesis in food science and technology

Plant based drinks: Processing parameters in a lab-scale study

Assessment of processing parameters of influence on plant-based drinks quality

phd thesis in food science and technology

Extraction and Purification of RuBisCO for Future Food Applications

Interested in sustainable protein, processing, and functional properties? This is the project for you

phd thesis in food science and technology

The significance of the MAPK and AMPK signalling pathways on satellite cell differentiation

How can we control cell growth for cultured meat?

phd thesis in food science and technology

Crystallization and morphology of vegetable oils

Crystallization and morphology of vegetable oils and factors affecting these phenomena to develop green and sustainable fractionation processes for the food industry

phd thesis in food science and technology

Increasing the value of milk and milk components through processing

A better understanding of how to control dairy components during processing will lead to mining value in milk

phd thesis in food science and technology

Exploring the future of hemp protein-structure and functionality

Shaping future food ingredients for a more sustainable food industry

phd thesis in food science and technology

Extraction and characterization of pea protein

phd thesis in food science and technology

Processing future food materials

For a more sustainable food industry, better processing approaches are needed

phd thesis in food science and technology

Production of cultured meat

Work with a sustainable meat production of the future. Which steps have an impact on the final composition and functionality of cultivated meat?

phd thesis in food science and technology

Cultivated meat in bioreactors

Take cultivated meat from lab scale to bioreactors

2024 TASTE of RESEARCH - OSU Food Science and Technology

Actions Panel

2024 taste of research - osu food science and technology.

Experience a taste of the cutting-edge science that is shaping the sustainable future of food. Presentations by OSU Graduate Students.

Date and time

Wiegand Hall

Refund Policy

About this event.

  • 3 hours 30 minutes
  • Mobile eTicket

Please join us for the 2024 Taste of Research: a coming together of people and ideas that advances the quality and usefulness of food science research. As a member of the Food and Beverage Industry, we know you are an integral part of this equation. We hope you'll attend and contribute to the conversation!

Enjoy an opportunity to network and engage with our food science students and faculty during the poster session and social hour after the main event! Refreshments will be provided.

  • United States Events
  • Oregon Events
  • Things to do in Corvallis, OR
  • Corvallis Conferences
  • Corvallis Science & Tech Conferences
  • #foodscience
  • #science_and_technology
  • #research_and_development

About the organizer

IMAGES

  1. THESIS SUBMISSION FOR REVISION

    phd thesis in food science and technology

  2. (PDF) PhD Thesis: Exploring the role of Short Food Supply Chains in Enhancing the livelihoods of

    phd thesis in food science and technology

  3. PhD Programs Admissions 2024 Pakistan

    phd thesis in food science and technology

  4. Thesis/Project Write-up Guidelines

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  5. Choose Unique Food Technology Thesis Topics

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  6. ≡ ISSUU ᐈ Sample Phd Research Proposal ebook pdf

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VIDEO

  1. Pentadecanoic Acid C15

  2. PHD Project is helping shape the future workforce

  3. Flow of the VR Experiment in VR

  4. How I become a PhD in Chemistry

  5. Real-Life Experience: Inspiring PhD Topics

  6. Decoding doctoral dissertation: A step by step guide to writing a PhD thesis on Natural Sciences

COMMENTS

  1. Department of Food Science and Technology: Dissertations, Theses, and

    PhD candidates: You are welcome and encouraged to deposit your dissertation here, but be aware that 1) it is optional, not required (the ProQuest deposit is required); and 2) it will be available to everyone online; there is no embargo for dissertations in the UNL Digital Commons. Master's candidates: Deposit of your thesis or project is required.

  2. Doctor of Philosophy in Food Science and Technology < Texas A&M

    Students may pursue fundamental and/or translational (i.e. applied) research in the areas of food chemistry, products processing, food microbiology and safety including probiotic microbiology, engineering and rheology, food packaging, ingredients technology, meat or poultry science, cereals science and processing, plant bioactives, sensory analy...

  3. Food Science Graduate Theses and Dissertations

    PDF Characterization of Blueberry (Poly)phenolics in Foods, their Metabolites in Human Biological Samples and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Phytochemicals In Vitro, Laura Felgus-Lavefve

  4. Food Science Department Masters Theses Collection

    Theses from 2023 PDF. Sucrose Concentration and Fermentation Temperature Impact the Sensory Characteristics and Liking of Kombucha, Gil Cohen, Food Science. PDF. Nutrient Density, Added Sugar, and Fiber Contents of Commercially Available Fruit Snacks in the United States from 2017 to 2022, Hao Fu, Food Science. PDF

  5. MSc & PhD in Food Science (Thesis/Research)

    MSc & PhD in Food Science (Thesis/Research) Combine the pure sciences to develop innovative and healthy food. This program is offered through the Department of Food Science which focuses its research on enhancing the quality, safety, functionality and nutrition of foods.

  6. Food Science and Technology

    For Ph.D. students, satisfactory completion of written and oral preliminary examination Professional presentation of thesis research as a departmental seminar Preparation of a manuscript for submission to a peer-reviewed journal Formal evaluation of teaching efforts Annual review of student progress by a committee of faculty

  7. PhD Theses

    PhD Theses. Salting of Muscle Foods - Effects of processing conditions and sodium reduction. Characterisation of a novel gelatin-based drug delivery system. Oxidation of marine lipids in liposomes and emulsions mediated by iron and methemoglobin. Bacterial Recombinant Expression by Positively Regulated XylS/ Pm Promoter System - Comparative.

  8. Graduate Program

    Welcome to the Food Science Graduate Group. Members of this group apply a fundamental understanding of biological, chemical, physical, and behavioral sciences to the processing, preservation, quality evaluation, public health aspects, and utilization of foods. The graduate group offers programs leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in Food Science, with research ...

  9. Food Science and Technology (Ph.D., M.S., minor)

    The Department of Food Science and Technology offers graduate programs leading toward the Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. A variety of research specializations are available covering the chemical, physical, microbiological, and sensory properties of foods. Areas of thesis research Research disciplines Flavor chemistry Food chemistry/biochemistry Food and

  10. Graduate Field of Food Science & Technology

    As one of the premier food science programs in the nation, our program integrates the disciplines of chemistry, biology, nutrition, physiology, biotechnology and engineering to ensure that all people have access to healthy, affordable food. Apply More about Food Science & Technology M.S.

  11. Food Science M.S. & Ph.D.

    In-residence students selecting to focus on food science for their graduate education can pursue thesis or non-thesis M.S. and Ph.D. programs. Course descriptions Research Areas You have the opportunity to study a wide-variety of research areas related to food science, including these general focal areas of strength: food chemistry sensory science

  12. Food Science and Technology (MS)

    Food Science and Technology faculty are located in the Food Innovation Center on Nebraska Innovation Campus (NIC). The Food Innovation Center includes state-of-the-art classrooms, teaching labs, and wet/dry lab research space. It also includes clinical facilities, sensory lab, and pilot plants. The program is highly flexible allowing you to ...

  13. Food Science and Technology (MSc, PhD)

    This program offers graduate level class work and research opportunities related to food process technology, food microbiology, edible oils, engineering design, post-mortem biochemistry of muscle foods, proteins and enzymes, food rheology, and beverage science. A wide range of food processing equipment, a pilot plant, and well-equipped ...

  14. Theses and Dissertations (Food Science)

    Theses and Dissertations (Food Science) Browse by Issue Date Authors Titles Subjects Supervisor UP Author UP Postgraduate Type Search within this collection: Recent Submissions Food patterns in relation to weight status and body composition of female adolescents in Tshwane Matete, Ntsepase P. (University of Pretoria, 2022)

  15. Food Science & Technology Graduate Studies

    The Master of Science in Food Science, Nutrition and Health Promotion with a concentration in Food Science and Technology requires a minimum of 30 hours of graduate credit (Including 6 hours of research/thesis), a research thesis, and a final defense.

  16. Postgraduate Programmes in Food Science & Technology

    The Food Science & Technology Unit operates under the Department of Chemical Engineering where it provides offerings of one (1) taught Masters Degree in Food Science & Technology and two (2) degrees by research at the MPhil and PhD level. ... These being research degrees, students will be expected to produce a satisfactory thesis (MPhil or PhD ...

  17. Graduate Student Handbook

    All Food Science and Technology graduate students are required to complete a Student Progress Report form and meet with their supervisory committee at least once a year to review progress and discuss future research/projects and academic plans. ... including thesis credits, must be in Food Science and Technology (FDST) Minimum of 8 credit hours ...

  18. 25 PhD programmes in Food Technology

    The Food Science and Technology program is offered by Cornell University. Ph.D. / Full-time / On Campus. Cornell UniversityIthaca, New ... Graduate degrees in Food Science and Technology are administered by the Graduate Faculty of Food Science within the Department of Food Science and Technology in accordance with all relevant policies and ...

  19. Frontiers in Food Science and Technology

    Agro-Morphological and Nutritional Profiling of Crops Vol. 2. Explores new thinking in global food science and food production systems. It couples innovation with an eye on sustainability, in line with the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

  20. Fields of Study : Graduate School

    Food Science and Technology Ph.D. (Ithaca) Field of Study. Food Science and Technology. Program Description. Candidates for the Ph.D. degree select one major in the field and two minors outside the field. There are no general course credit requirements for the Ph.D. degree.

  21. PhD(Food Science and Technology) : NUS Graduate School (NUSGS)

    Three Minute Thesis (3MT) NUS Graduate School Partnership with Industry Scheme for Graduate Research Talent (The NUSGS π Scheme) Financial Aid. Student Research Assistant Scheme (SRA) ... PhD(Food Science and Technology) Level: PhD Faculty: Science Length: 4 - 5 years Intake: January/August Deadline: 15 May/15 ...

  22. PDF Hawassa University College of Agriculture School of Nutrition, Food

    major advisor: heidi busse (phd) co-advisor: tona zema (msc) a thesis submitted to the school of nutrition, food science and technology, hawassa university college of agriculture in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of master of science in applied human nutrition february, 2020 hawassa, ethiopia school of graduate studies

  23. Master's thesis projects about food technology at Depart. of Food Science

    Master's thesis projects about food technology at Depart. of Food Science Food Technology Barley proteins for human consumption This project will investigate the protein profile using protein chemical and proteomics techniques of different barley cultivars to identify how this influences its use for human consumption

  24. 2024 TASTE of RESEARCH

    Please join us for the 2024 Taste of Research: a coming together of people and ideas that advances the quality and usefulness of food science research. As a member of the Food and Beverage Industry, we know you are an integral part of this equation. We hope you'll attend and contribute to the conversation! Enjoy an opportunity to network and ...