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Military TDY: Temporary Duty Assignment Explained

military tdy

The U.S. Armed Forces issue different types of military travel orders to personnel.

Your military travel orders pertain to changes in your duty location and the duration, and may also impact your military pay.

Military TDY (Temporary Duty) is one common type of military travel order .

Get all your questions answered about Temporary Duty (TDY) status and what you can expect to experience with this type of order.

Related Article – Military Child Care: 8 Great Options

Table of Contents

What is TDY?

temporary duty assignment

The U.S. Military has three primary types of military travel orders:

  • Permanent Change of Station (PCS)
  • Temporary Duty (TDY)
  • Deployments Orders

It is important to keep in mind that the three types of military assignment orders are not the same and each has its own characteristics.

Your military orders may affect how long you serve at the post, the specific location, and special duty pay.

Temporary Duty (TDY) is defined by the Department of Defense as:

Duty at one or more locations, away from the permanent duty station (PDS), under an order, providing for further assignment or pending further assignment, to return to the old PDS or to proceed to a new PDS.

Military branches under the U.S. Armed Forces have different references for Military TDY, like TAD (temporary additional duty) or TCS (temporary change of station).

However, they all mean basically the same thing that your military orders are temporary.

The primary difference between Military TDY and other orders is that it grants authorization for a service member to perform work away from the permanent duty station.

The Department of Defense requires the label Military TDY (or one of its variants) to approve travel pay, per diem, and coverage of other expenses to assist the soldier.

Since the assignment is temporary, the service member can expect a shorter stay than a permanent station assignment, however, the length of the orders may vary.

The individual details of TDY orders are fleshed out with each commitment.

The specifics of your Military TDY outline expected duration, amount of travel pay, coverage of expenses, housing and food support, transportation, and other forms of assistance.

How long is a TDY?

Military TDY is temporary for military orders, so the length is generally not longer than 180 days.

Temporary duty orders may range anywhere from a few days to a half year.

Long-term TDY is any orders which specify longer than 30 days.

TDY per diem rates depend on the location you have orders for. It will also include reimbursement for lodging, meals, and incidentals. 

Use this calculator to determine how much you can expect to receive. 

Military TDY is a stark contrast from Permanent Duty Assignments and Deployments, which have commitments of several months or years.

The Department of Defense authorizes TDY through Joint Travel Regulations.

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Is TDY considered a deployment?

tcs order

Technically there is a difference between a temporary duty assignment (TDY) and Deployment, even though they are both military orders.

Deployments are similar to military TDY, except that the service member is assigned to a specific operation.

Therefore, deployments usually reference combat operations that take place overseas.

When most civilians think of military orders, they commonly associate everything with being deployed, though that’s not always the case based on the actual military definition.

Deployment refers to assigning military personnel from a home station to somewhere outside the continental United States.

Mobilizations are also classified as deployments under the Department of Defense guidelines.

How does a TDY differ from a deployment?

The biggest difference between deployments and temporary duty assignments is the length of the orders.

Military TDY is short-term, with even longer stints requiring less than a half year of commitment.

On the other hand, deployments are typically longer and involve assignments outside the United States.

Additionally, deployments involve assignments to specific operations and usually in combat situations.

However, both types of military orders have similarities.

For example, military personnel must leave their home station for a different location under each type of order.

Military TDY is not always as serious as deployments.

For instance, a temporary duty assignment could mean nothing more than attending school, conferences, or a military-sponsored event.

Or it could pertain to a regular part of military duty where frequent travel is mandatory and the service member hopes to receive some form of compensation for their travel exs.

There are cases where military personnel earn TDY status even when working in the same geographic area as the home base to justify lodging and meal expenses associated with the duty.

Soldiers also rely on military TDY for house hunting and other searches when considering a new permanent change of station or out-processing from military service.

Can I go with my husband/wife on a TDY?

tdy army

One of the many perks of temporary duty assignments is that you can occasionally bring along the family.

The same is not true of deployments where it would put your spouse or other family members in danger.

If given the chance to bring along a spouse for your temporary duty assignment, you should welcome the opportunity, but keep in mind that pier diem rates are only calculated for the service member.

Military personnel often spend months away from family and friends, so having a unique opportunity like this to spend with a loved one is rare and special.

MilitaryShoppers.com put together a great resource on the topic.

It explains the pros and cons of tagging along with a significant other while he or she is on TDY.

The most important thing to keep in mind is that while you can live with your spouse while on temporary duty assignment, his or her time is still limited and it might drain your budget quickly.

Other than that, it’s an enticing opportunity to catch up after potentially months of separation.

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Will I get paid extra during a TDY?

Despite having to leave your home station, there is nothing more rewarding than a little extra pay in freedom.

It is exactly what temporary duty assignments provide to service members.

In fact, the reason that military personnel may request or seek TDY is the opportunity to put more in their wallet.

Military TDY usually grants per diem pay, which helps cover lodging, meals, and incidental expenses.

You get a set per diem pay regardless of what you actually spend each day on daily expenses.

As a result, if you budget accordingly, you can earn extra cash by pocketing whatever per diem you don’t spend on daily living expenses.

What kind of accommodations can I expect during a TDY?

deployment orders

The accommodations of temporary duty assignments are nothing to brag about yet offer incentives that most military personnel don’t get to enjoy.

For example, the potential opportunity to take your significant other along with you when TDY is a major advantage for some.

Military personnel may get the opportunity to stay at furnished apartments or long-term stay hotels.

Long-term stays help save you money on your per diem since you can cook your own meals as opposed to dining out all of the time.

Furnished apartments may also include laundry and other housing services to save even more money.

Service members on TDY may also request a cash advance of 60-80% of the total value.

It helps cover move-in costs as opposed to spending out of their own pocket.

Some military organizations deem anything over 30 consecutive calendar days. 

For this reason, it allows partial reimbursement of living expenses prior to concluding the assignment.

Military TDY, or temporary duty assignments, refer to relatively short-term military travel orders away from a home station.

Temporary duty assignments range from a couple of days to under six months.

Military TDY is a good thing for soldiers despite the travel arrangements, as it helps cover lodging, food, and transportation regarding the orders.

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Military TDY: What it is, How it Works, and What to Expect

what is a military assignment

Table of Contents

What is military tdy, how does military tdy work, what to expect during military tdy.

Military TDY is a common term used in the United States military to refer to temporary duty assignments that require service members to leave their home station and travel to a different location for a short period of time. In this article, we'll take a closer look at what military TDY is, how it works, and what service members can expect when they are assigned to TDY.

Military TDY, or Temporary Duty, is a type of assignment that requires service members to travel away from their home station for a period of time ranging from a few days to several months. TDY can be for a variety of reasons, including training, special assignments, temporary duty with other units or organizations, or for mission-related travel.

Military TDY can be initiated by a service member's unit, a higher headquarters, or by a specific mission requirement. Once a service member is selected for TDY, they are typically provided with orders that outline the purpose of the TDY, the location they will be traveling to, the duration of the assignment, and any other special instructions or requirements.

When traveling for TDY, service members are typically provided with transportation to and from their TDY location, as well as lodging, per diem for meals, and any other necessary support. While on TDY, service members are expected to perform the duties assigned to them and follow all applicable military regulations and policies.

When assigned to TDY, service members can expect to be away from their home station for the duration of the assignment. Depending on the location of the TDY, service members may be required to travel by commercial airline, military aircraft, or ground transportation. Upon arrival at their TDY location, service members will typically check in with their sponsor or point of contact and receive a briefing on the local area and any specific requirements or restrictions.

Service members will be responsible for performing the duties assigned to them during the TDY, which may include training, operational missions, or support functions. While on TDY, service members are expected to maintain a professional appearance and conduct themselves in accordance with military regulations and policies.

Military TDY is a common type of assignment in the United States military that requires service members to travel away from their home station for a temporary period of time. TDY can be for a variety of reasons, including training, special assignments, and mission-related travel. Service members selected for TDY can expect to receive orders outlining the purpose, location, and duration of the assignment, as well as any special instructions or requirements. While on TDY, service members are expected to perform the duties assigned to them and follow all applicable military regulations and policies.

what is a military assignment

Hello! I am an avid military enthusiast and analyst. With a deep passion for military history, strategy, and technology, I like to provide insightful perspectives on global conflicts and defense mechanisms for OnlineMilitaryEducation.org.

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Temporary Duty Assignments – Understanding Your Pay & Benefits While on TDY Orders

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TDY is the three-letter acronym that often leaves servicemembers and families confused. Get to know the various types of Temporary Duty Assignment (TDY) or Temporary Assignment Duty (TAD) to keep your finances and sanity from teetering into the red when you are on TDY orders.

Fully  understanding your military assignments and benefits is the benchmark of a seasoned servicemember. Pay increases or decreases, what per diem covers, and whether or not family members could or should accompany are all factors to fully grasp before going TDY.

Understanding TDY Orders

Three Types of Military Orders

There are three primary types of military orders:

  • Permanent Change of Station (PCS)
  • Temporary Duty Assignment (TDY)

Of the three, TDY orders are likely the most complex, as they can be issued as an add-on to additional orders like a PCS. In addition to complexity, TDY orders also offer the most flexibility for servicemembers and their dependents to determine how they will handle assignments, placing them in a location anywhere from just a few days to six months.

There are likely dozens of situations where TDY may be issued. Some examples include additional schooling, career specialties that require frequent travel, or completing special assignments for the military. In nature, the assignments are meant to be short in duration and non-permanent.

» MORE: Unleash the Full Potential of Your VA Home Loan Benefits

Financial Considerations of TDY Orders

The financial characteristics of TDY are perhaps the most important piece to understand. Consider TDY orders to be similar to travel for professional civilian jobs (like conferences). The organization, in this case, the military, will authorize a certain dollar amount per day called “per diem” for everyday expenses such as food, lodging, and transportation. Essentially, additional TDY pay on top of your regular pay is an additional fixed budget given to you per day. It is the servicemember’s responsibility to budget adequately.

You may be eligible for per diem even if you are temporarily assigned in the same state as your current duty station depending on the situation.

While on assignment, it is critical to keep the following receipts so you can have them validated for reimbursement upon return.

  • Meal receipts
  • Taxi/Uber/shuttle expenses
  • Any travel costs like flights, subway, etc.
  • Daily mileage totals (if you are traveling in your own vehicle)
  • Incidental expenses or any unexpected costs directly related to daily operations

According to the Department of Defense , “A Service member ordered to a U.S. installation must use adequate and available Government quarters.” This means that if lodging is available, you will likely be required to stay in military housing, such as the barracks, or in installation hotels or accommodations. While exceptions to policy (ETP) do happen, it is largely dependent on a host of factors.

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Exceptions to Policy (ETP)

Let’s say, for example, that following his commission , a soldier receives TDY orders to Basic Officer Leaders Course (BOLC) which requires a six-month stay. The soldier has a family and would prefer they accompany him to the training and he requests to stay in off-installation accommodations for the duration of the training course.

While it is not guaranteed, this is a strong case for ETP to be considered. Off installation accommodations would offer greater flexibility to find budget-friendly options within per diem that also include benefits such as on-site laundry and kitchenettes.

When overages or excessive fees are incurred or circumstances constitute an exception to policy, the Authorizing Official (AO) will need to pre-approve the charges before they will be reimbursed. You may not be reimbursed if you are not given pre-authorization, so it is essential to communicate prior to making decisions that will incur costs.

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Per Diem – What is Covered on TDY Orders?

Knowing what is not covered in per diem is just as important as knowing what is.

The military will not cover alcohol purchases in stores or in restaurant establishments. If a servicemember chooses to consume alcohol with their meal, a separate receipt would likely be the best choice, additionally, any charges will be the full responsibility of the individual. Additionally, when deciding to consume alcohol, a full understanding of what hours are considered on and off duty is the responsibility of the servicemember.

Family Separation Allowance (FSA) is an additional benefit offered to servicemembers when they are on assignment away from their family greater than 30 days. It is important to note that if a servicemember’s family accompanies the active duty member for the entire duration of the TDY, FSA would not be considered. However, FSA benefits do apply when dependents visit the servicemember for less than 30 consecutive days.

The eligibility for FSA may be extended to National Guard and wounded warriors, depending on the type, length, and restrictions of the TDY assignment.

» MORE: Veterans: Unlock Your Homebuying Dreams with a VA Loan

Meal rates are based upon location, just like in the civilian world. Speaking with the Authorizing Official (AO) before going TDY to get a precise dollar amount for per diem is highly recommended. A portion, but not always the full amount of gratuity is also included in travel-related expenses.

An often-forgotten component of TDY rates includes factoring in “included” meals provided by the conference or government in your stay. If two out of three meals will be provided, rates may be reduced per day as well as any additional meals. Religious or dietary requirements are an exception to the policy if the traveler meets all requirements. All servicemembers should speak with their local Authorizing Official, command, and financial office to ensure they are fully up to speed.

Going TDY can provide an interesting change of pace and has the potential to put some extra cash in your pocket depending on your budget and personal preferences. If you are someone who likes to cook for yourself in a kitchenette you can save some money. But if you are expected to attend formal functions, eating out often, TDY can get expensive. With a little planning, your TDY experience can be a good one.

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First Duty and Future Assignments in the Military

There are circumstances where military members can request assignment

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Future Assignments

Follow-on assignment, hardship assignments, joint spouse assignments, permissive reassignments, base of preference, travel entitlements, privately owned vehicle shipment.

Rod Powers was a retired Air Force First Sergeant with 22 years of active duty service.

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First duty station selection is made (in either basic training or technical school/AIT/A-School), based ​upon your preferences, and the needs of the service. While the services will consider your preferences, the overriding deciding factor is where the military needs you the most.

Some Navy jobs  allow your assignment to be based on your class-standing in "A-School." And of course, it goes without saying that assignments are based on valid vacancies. If you have the job of tank-fixer, you're only going to be assigned to bases that have tanks to fix.

After the first duty assignment, subsequent assignments are done a little differently. In most cases, you'll have a little more say in future assignments, than you have for the first duty assignment . There are a few restrictions, however.

First-term (those in their first enlistment ) enlisted members assigned to a continental (CONUS) U.S. location must have 12 months time-on-station before being eligible to move to an overseas location and must have 24 months time-on-station before being allowed to move to another continental U.S. location.

Career (those who have re-enlisted at least once) enlisted members assigned to the continental U.S. must have 24 months time-on-station to move to an overseas location and must have 36 months time-on-station in order to move to another continental U.S. location.

The length of time one spends on an overseas tour depends on the location. For example, most of Europe and Japan are considered standard overseas tours. The length of the assignment is 24 months for single people, or those with dependents who elect not to bring their dependents, and 36 months for those who bring their dependents.

Another type of overseas assignment, like most assignments to Korea, is considered remote. On a remote tour one cannot bring their family at government expense, and the tour-length is 12 months. On the other hand, those returning from a remote tour usually get assignment preference over those returning from a standard tour.

For standard overseas tours, one can generally increase his or her chances of being selected by volunteering for the extended tour length. This is the standard tour, plus 12 months.

Of course, one can be involuntarily assigned overseas as well. In general, this is done based on the military member's last overseas return date. 

A follow-on assignment is an assignment after a remote tour. Those with orders for a remote tour can apply for their next assignment before they even depart to the remote tour.

When is assigned to a 12-month remote tour, military members can move their dependents anywhere they want to live in the United States, at government expense, while the member is away. The government must then pay again to relocate the dependents from where they are living to the new assignment when the member returns from the remote tour. Single people, even though they don't have dependents can use the follow-on program, as well.

It's important not to confuse assignments with deployments , which are of course based on many factors such as geopolitical situations and the need for U.S. military troops around the world. 

Each of the services also has procedures for hardship assignments. This allows a military member to apply for reassignment to a specific area/base, due to a valid family hardship. The military's definition of hardship is when there are extreme family problems such as illness, death, or extremely unusual circumstances that are temporary in nature and the specific circumstances necessitate the military member's presence.

If the problem is not one that can be resolved within one year, a  hardship discharge  will be considered, rather than a hardship assignment.

When one military member is married to another military member, both must apply to be assigned together. This is called a joint spouse assignment. The military will try to assign spouses together, but there are no guarantees. The success rate for joint spouse assignments is about 85 percent.

Joint spouse assignments are obviously much easier to accommodate if both spouses are in the same branch of the military. 

A permissive reassignment is one that doesn't cost the government any money. Most permissive reassignments are in the form of swaps, which is when one military member finds another with the same rank and job, currently assigned (or with orders) to a base they want to go to.

Both members who agree to swap must pay for their own move. This includes shipment of personal property. Usually, military personnel offices maintain lists of military people worldwide who are looking to swap. In order to be eligible for a swap, one must have the required time-on-station mentioned above. In other words, a first-termer must have 24 months time-on-station to swap with someone at another continental U.S. location.

Before a military member re-enlists, he can apply to move to a base of his choice. The military, of course, wants this person to re-enlist, so they try to accommodate such base of preference requests. If approved, the member must then re-enlist to accept the assignment. 

When you graduate technical school, the military will pay the authorized costs for you to go to your next duty assignment or, to the port of your military flight for overseas assignments. 

The military does not pay you for travel on leave. They pay you for direct travel from your old duty assignment to your next duty assignment. If you travel home on leave, any additional cost is out of your pocket.

If you own a vehicle and get an overseas assignment, the military will either ship the vehicle for you or store it while you are away. 

Some locations don't allow the shipping of a personal vehicle and others restrict this privilege to certain ranks. In these cases, the military will store the vehicle for you for free while you are assigned overseas.

The military will pay to move your personal property from your home location to your first permanent duty station, or, you can rent a truck, move it yourself. In such cases, the military will reimburse you a portion of what it would have paid a contractor to move the vehicle.

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Glossary of Military Terms

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what is a military assignment

Check this glossary for commonly used military terms.

The list of terms below is from Today's Military online guide by the U.S. Department of Defense.

Active Duty Continuous duty on a daily basis. Comparable to "full time" as used in reference to a civilian job.

Allowances Money, other than basic pay, to compensate in certain situations for expenses, such as meals, rent, clothing, and travel. Usually given for maintaining proficiency in a specific skill area, such as flying or parachuting.

Artillery Large cannons or missile launchers used in combat.

ASVAB Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery. A test that assists students in career exploration and decision-making. Used by the military services to determine enlistment eligibility and to assign occupational specialties.

Base A location of an installation on which a military force relies for supplies or from where it initiates operations.

Basic Pay The pay a military member receives, as determined by pay grade and length of service. Does not include other benefits such as allowance or bonuses.

Civilian Anyone not on active duty in the military.

Commissioned Officer A member of the military with the rank of second lieutenant or ensign or above. This role in the military is similar to that of a manager or executive.

DEP Delayed Entry Program. Allows an applicant to delay entry into active duty for up to one year for such things as finishing school.

Drill To train or exercise in military operations.

Duty Assigned task or occupation.

Enlisted Member Military personnel below the rank of warrant or commissioned officers. This role is similar to that of a company employee or supervisor.

Enlistee A service member, not a warrant officer or commissioned officer, who has been accepted by the military and has taken the Oath of Enlistment.

Enlistment Agreement/Contract A legal contract between the military and an enlistment applicant. Includes information on enlistment date, term of enlistment, and other options such as a training program guarantee or a cash bonus.

GI Bill Benefits A program of education benefits for individuals entering the military. Allows service persons to set aside money to be used later for educational purposes.

Inactive Reserve Duty Affiliation with the military in a non-training, non-paying status after completing minimum obligation off active duty service.

Infantry Units of men trained, armed, and equipped to fight on foot.

Job Specialty A specific job or occupation in one of the five services.

MEPS Military Entrance Processing Station. The enlistment process occurs at stations located around the country.

National Guard Serves in both a state and federal capacity. May be call on to assist in community support, disaster relief, and other local emergencies. During national emergencies, units are called on to support their active counterparts in the Army and Air Force.

NCO Non-commissioned Officer. An enlisted member in pay grades E-4 or higher.

Obligation The period of time one agrees to serve on active duty, in the reserve, or a combination of both.

OCS Officer Candidate School. For college graduates with no prior military training who wish to become military officers. Qualified enlisted members may also attend. After successful completion, candidates are commissioned as military officers.

OTS (OTG) Officer Training School (Group). See OCS, Officer Candidate School.

Officer See commissioned officer.

Pay Grade A level of employment designated by the military. There are nine enlisted pay grades and 10 officers pay grades through which they can progress during their career. Pay grade and length of service determine a service member's pay.

Quarters Living accommodations or housing.

Recruit See enlistee.

Regular Military Compensation Total value of basic pay, allowances, and tax savings. The amount of pay a civilian worker would need to earn to receive the same take home "pay" as a services member.

Reserves People in the military who are not on full-time, active duty. May be called up in a national emergency to serve on active duty. During peacetime, they support the active duty forces in our country's defense. Reservists are also entitled to some of the employment benefits available to active military personnel.

ROTC Reserve Officers' Training Corps. Training given to undergraduate college students who plan to become military officers. Often they receive scholarships for tuition, books, fees, uniforms, and a monthly allowance.

Service or Services A branch or multiple branches of the United States Armed Forces. There are five in all: the Army, the Air Force, the Coast Guard, the Marine Corps (or Marines) and the Navy.

Services Classifier A military information specialist who helps applicants select a military occupational field.

Service Obligation The amount of time an enlisted member agrees to serve in the military as stated in the enlistment agreement.

Station A place of assigned duty.

Tour of Duty A period of obligated service. Also used to describe a type of duty tour, such as a "Mediterranean tour."

Warrant Officer A member of the Army, Navy, or Marines who is a technical specialist or pilot. These members are generally appointed from the enlisted, non-commissioned officer ranks.

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The Military Has a Vocabulary All its Own. Here are Some Common Terms and Phrases

Deployed parachute sky blossom

The U.S. military uses many unique items and concepts that civilians aren't exposed to. Because of this and the need for expedient, clear communication, service members are immersed in a linguistic world apart from the daily life of a civilian. Some are self-explanatory and others are completely cryptic, but they each have a specific and important (sometimes) meaning.

Be sure to check out Military.com's Glossary of Military Acronyms .

If you want to know more, check out our complete guide to the military alphabet .

11 Bullet Catcher/Bang-Bang -- An Army infantryman. Recommended by user NGH144.

40 Mike-Mike -- An M203 grenade launcher, usually mounted under an M-16 or similar weapon.

Air Picket -- Any airborne system tasked with detecting, reporting and tracking enemy aerial movements within a certain area of operation.

Alpha Charlie -- Military alphabet used to represent ass chewing. Defines getting verbally reprimanded. Recommended by user Joe Trejo.

Anymouse -- A lockbox on Navy ships where sailors may drop anonymous suggestions.

Ass -- Armored vehicles such as Strykers and Tanks.

Ate-Up -- Describes a service member who follows regulations so closely that they disregard the context of the situation. Conversely, may describe a service member who doesn't understand regulations at all.

Band-Aid -- A Vietnam-era term for a medic.

Bang-bang -- An Army term describing a pistol or rifle.

Big Voice -- Term used to describe the loudspeaker on a military base. The Big Voice warns of everything from incoming attacks to scheduled ordnance disposal.

Bird -- Slang for helicopter.

Bitchin' Betty -- Most U.S. military aircraft feature warning systems that frequently utilize female voices. The phrase is derived from the same anthropomorphizing applied to GPS units in cars, only Bitchin' Betty's alert pilots to life-threatening situations.

'Black' on ammo, fuel, water, etc. -- A common phrase denoting a particular resource is gone.

Blowed up -- The state of being hit by an IED.

Blue Falcon -- A euphemism for buddy **** or buddy ****er, which is slang for a backstabber. Recommended by user jpchopper .

Bolo -- A derogatory remark for recruits who cannot pass marksmanship training. The idea being that if one cannot use a rifle, one must resort to a bolo.

Bone -- A B-1 bomber.

Bull**** Bomb -- A package intended to disperse propaganda leaflets. Recommended by user Steve Neal .

Bullwinkle Badge -- Another name for the Air Assault Badge. Recommended by user David E Windsor II .

Burn Bag -- A bag used to hold shredded documents, designed to be burned. May also refer to a useless person. Recommended by user Gregory Waugh .

Cannibalize -- The act of taking workable parts of one item and using them in another.

Chancre Mechanic -- Medical officer who checks service members for venereal diseases. Recommended by user jloman42.

Charlie Foxtrot -- Commonly used expression utilizing the military alphabet to stand for clusterf***.

Chem-Light Batteries -- A mythical object that would be extremely, functionally pointless. Often the source of fruitless hunts embarked upon by hapless privates. Recommended by user Nick_1.

Chest Candy -- Slang for ribbons and medals worn on a uniform. Can be insulting or applauding.

Chicken plates -- Sheets of protective material, called Small Arms Protective Inserts, which are used in the Interceptor body armor system.

Comics -- Term used to describe maps presented by military intelligence. The term is fairly derogatory in nature as a slight against the accuracy of the maps. It also refers to the brightly colored layouts and symbols usually included.

Commo -- Communications equipment or the individuals who operate it. Usually given to communications officers on U.S. Navy vessels.

Crank -- Navy term for a sailor pulling temporary duty in the galley.

Crumb Catcher -- Military slang describing the mouth.

Crusher -- Hats worn by pilots during World War II. The hat's wide top brim would need to be crushed down to allow for headsets to be worn.

Dear John -- Common term referring to a significant other breaking up with a service member through a letter. Recommended by user wilburbythepsea .

Demilitarized Zone -- A specific area in which any type of military force -- including but not limited to personnel, hardware and infrastructure -- are banned.

Digit Midget -- Usually used with a number as a prefix. X digit midget refers to the number of days till an individual goes on leave or retires. Recommended by user Steve Pinder .

Digies -- Digital camouflage worn by soldiers and Marines.

Dittybopper -- A term in the Army referring to signals intelligence radio operators trained to utilize Morse code. Also used as a verb to describe soldiers marching out of synch with a cadence.

Dope on a Rope -- Derogatory term used for air-assault soldiers.

Dust-off -- Specifically, a medical evacuation by helicopter.

Dynamited Chicken -- Term originating in the Navy referring to chicken cacciatore or chicken a la king.

Embed -- When a reporter stays with the military in order to conduct journalistic business. They typically are provided with security and basic necessities provided by the unit they are embedded with.

Expectant -- A casualty who is expected to pass die.

Eagle Keeper -- Maintenance crew chief of an F-15 .

Fang -- A verb to describe being rebuked, called out or otherwise disparaged.

Fangs -- A Marine Corps term for one's teeth.

Fart Sack -- Refers to a sleeping bag or an airman's flight suit.

Farts and Darts -- Refers to the clouds and lightning bolt embellishments found on Air Force officer caps. Recommended by user NGH144.

Fashion Show -- A Naval punishment where a sailor is required to dress in each of his uniforms over a period of several hours.

Fast Mover -- Slang for a jet fighter. Aptly named due to the rapidity of a jet fighter's movement.

First Light -- The time of nautical twilight when the sun is 12 degrees below the horizon.

Flaming ***hole -- An Air Force term to describe the fiery effect of a jet plane turning on its afterburners during combat or any other military operation.

Flight Suit Insert -- Air Force slang for a pilot.

Fitty -- Slang for an M2 .50 caliber machine gun.

Five-Sided Puzzle Palace -- Slang for the Pentagon.

Football Bat -- An individual or way of doing things that is particularly odd.

Force Projection -- The ability of a nation-state to extend military force beyond their borders.

Fourth Point of Contact -- From rolling after a successful parachute drop: a term to describe an individual's buttocks. The first three points are feet, calves and back of the thigh. Recommended by user elisemorgan.

Fruit Salad -- Slang for a service member's display of medals and ribbons on a dress uniform. Recommended by user DL_in _DEN.

Fugazi -- Completely out of whack, ****ed up, screwy. This term originated during the Vietnam War and experienced limited use by civilians.

Galloping Dandruff -- An Army term used since World War I to refer to crab lice.

Geardo -- An Army term for a soldier who spends an inordinate amount of money on gear, regardless of actual need.

Gedunk -- Refers to snack foods, such as candy and chips, as well as the place they're sold. Associated with the Navy and can be used in the phrase "gedunk sailor" as a pejorative remark for inexperienced sailors. Recommended by user bensonmccloud.

Gofasters -- A term for sneakers used in the Army, Navy and Marine Corps.

GOFO -- Literally stands for "grasp of the ****ing obvious."

Gone Elvis -- A service member who is missing in action.

Grape -- A term with two meanings; one for the Air Force and one for the Navy. A Navy Grape is an individual who refuels aircraft. An Air Force Grape, on the other hand, refers to an easy assignment and can be used as a compliment when a service member makes something look easy.

Great Mistakes -- The name sailors have given the Great Lakes Naval Training Center north of Chicago. It references the closing of two other training facilities in San Diego and Orlando, which both feature far more enjoyable weather.

Grid Squares -- A nonexistent item recruits typically are told to go find.

Groundhog Day -- Term originating from the titular movie that refers to deployment s that seem to proceed in the exact same way despite attempts to change them.

Gum Shoe -- Navy slang for a sailor cryptology technician. The first CT school was located on top of a building where tar would get stuck to the bottom of students' shoes.

Gun -- Term for a mortar or artillery piece. Must never be used within the military to describe a pistol or rifle.

Gunner -- A service member who operates a crew-served weapon, such as a piece of artillery or ship's cannon. Recommended by user John Alfred .

Hangar Queen -- An aircraft that is used primarily for spare parts to repair other planes. Recommended by Steve Pinder.

Hardball -- A hard-surfaced road.

Hardened Site -- A structure usually built under rock or concrete designed to withstand conventional, nuclear, biological and chemical attack.

Hat Up -- To change one's location. Refers to the need to wear a hat for the intended destination. Recommended by user JimBrown1946 .

Hawk -- Term for cold weather. Commonly referred to as "the hawk."

Helo -- Short-hand term for a helicopter.

High Speed -- An individual who is highly motivated and at or near peak efficacy. Can be used sarcastically. Recommended by user sara.

Hit the Silk -- Ejecting from an aircraft and utilizing a parachute.

Inactive Status -- Members of the Reserves who are unable to train for points, receive pay and cannot be considered for promotion.

Ink Stick -- Marine Corps term for a pen.

Iron Rations -- Rations used in an emergency survival situation.

Jawa -- Term for an Army soldier who is stationed in a desert area, named after the desert-dwelling aliens of "Star Wars."

Jesus Slippers -- Military-issued shower footwear.

Jockstrap Medal -- Derogatory term for medals given by the military to active CIA members.

Joe -- Army term for a soldier. Shortened from G.I. Joe.

Joint Operation Planning -- All type of planning involving joint military forces in regard to military operations, including, but not limited to, mobilization, deployment and sustainment.

Kinetic -- Slang adjective meaning violent.

Klicks -- Kilometers.

Latrine Queen -- Air Force specific term for a trainee in basic who is in charge of the team responsible for cleaning bathrooms.

Left-Handed Monkey Wrench -- A nonexistent tool. Often the object of fruitless searches undertaken by recruits at the behest of more experienced service members. Recommended by user John Alfred .

Long Pig -- Slang for when a human being is used as a source of food. Typically this happens in extremely desperate situations.

Major Nuclear Power -- Any nation-state with a nuclear arsenal capable of being delivered to any other nation in the world.

Meat Identifier -- A dish or sauce that identifies what type of meat is being served. For example, cranberry sauce indicates turkey while applesauce indicates pork chops.

Meat Wagon -- Slang for an ambulance or any other medical emergency vehicle. Recommended by user 5712540 .

Moonbeam -- Marine term for flashlight.

Moving Like Pond Water -- Moving so slowly that a unique term is required to describe it. Recommended by user 31320680.

Mustang -- Term referring to any officer who was promoted from the enlisted ranks. Can be used respectfully or pejoratively.

Nut to Butt -- The instruction used to tell soldiers to line up in a tight, forward-facing line wherein one's nuts are in extreme proximity to the butt of the soldier before them.

Officer's Candy -- Navy term used by sailors to describe the scented cake placed in urinals.

Officer of the Deck -- Any officer charged with the operation of a ship. Reports to the commanding officer, executive officer and navigator for relevant issues and concerns.

Over the Hill -- Missing in action or someone who officially has gone missing from their post.

Oxygen Thief -- A biting piece of slang for someone who's useless or talks too much.

Pad Eye Remover -- A nonexistent item used by sailors to trick new service members into a fruitless search. Pad-eyes are used to secure airplanes with chains.

People Tank -- A U.S. Navy term for the inner hull of a submarine.

Pill Pusher -- A U.S. Navy term for a hospital corpsman.

Pink Mist -- A distinct effect created by certain types of gunshot wounds.

Pogey Bait -- Snack food. A "pogue" is an individual who does not serve on the frontlines and performs non-combat-oriented roles. "Pogey bait" is, subsequently, a bribe given to these individuals in exchange for expedited or high-quality services.

Pollywog -- A sailor who has not crossed the equator on a U.S. Navy ship. Recommended by user Terry Thomason.

Puddle Pirate -- Member of the Coast Guard . So called due to a fallacious belief that the Coast Guard never operates in deep water.

PX Ranger -- An individual who purchases, from the Post Exchange, paraphernalia unique to certain prestigious ranks or occupations and passes them off as though they earned the items. Recommended by mw1968.

Quay -- A man-made structure between a shore and land that can be used by ships to berth and is typically an area for handling cargo.

Rainbow -- A new recruit in basic training. Recommended by user wilburbythespea .

Red Team -- A body of experts on a specific topic who are instructed to research and suggest alternative methods regarding a planned course of action.

Remington Raider -- A somewhat derogatory term used for Marines given the harrowing task of performing office duties.

Rocks and Shoals -- U.S. Navy rules and regulations.

Rotorhead -- Slang for a helicopter pilot. Recommended by user Bob Pante.

Ruck Up -- "Ruck" is short for "ruck sack," which refers to backpacks service members sometimes wear. To "ruck up" is to get through a particularly challenging or stressful situation. Recommended by mw1968.

Salad Bar -- References the service ribbons found on a military uniform.

Scrambled Eggs -- Refers to the embellishments found on some officer's caps. Recommended by user NGH144.

Self-Propelled Sandbags -- A derogatory term for a Marine based on their emphasis on fighting on the front lines. Recommended by user Nathan King .

Shavetail -- A term referring to second lieutenants in the U.S. Army. It primarily refers to the haircuts received in Officer Candidate School. The term's origins date to the time when the Army used pack animals, and handlers shaved the tail of newly broken animals to distinguish them from those more seasoned.

Shellback -- A sailor who has crossed the equator on a U.S. Navy ship. Responsible for turning all Pollywogs into Shellbacks once they cross the equator themselves. Recommended by user Terry Thomason.

Snake Eater -- Member of the U.S. Army Special Forces .

S*** on a Shingle -- Slang for a piece of toast with gravy. Recommended by user Mike W .

Sky Blossom -- A deployed parachute.

Slick Sleeve -- Refers to a sailor who has not yet earned a rank that requires decoration on the sleeves.

Smoke -- To punish a service member with excessive physical work due to a minor infraction.

Snivel Gear -- Any equipment meant for use in cold weather. Recommended by mw1968.

Soap chips -- A psychological operations (PSYOPS) tactic where fake letters from an enemy's home country are written and placed on bodies and battle wreckage. They include sentimental content, hint at the infidelity of loved ones back home and are designed to demoralize combatants.

Soup Sandwich -- Used to describe an individual, object, situation or mission that has gone horribly wrong. The thrust of the term's meaning derives from the fact that it is incredibly difficult, some would say impossible, to make a sandwich out of soup. Recommended by user David E Windsor II .

Swoop -- Marine term for a weekend trip off base.

Taco -- An Air Force term for receiving an "unsatisfactory" grade on a training exercise due to the vague taco-shape of the letter "u."

Tango Uniform -- Slang for "tits up," which is the position dead bodies tend to face. The term can be applied to the deceased as well as broken pieces of equipment. Recommended by users 10741875 and iaff .

Target Discrimination -- The capability of a surveillance or guidance system to choose certain targets when multiple options are presented.

Trench Monkey -- A derogatory term referring to a member of the U.S. Army.

Twidget -- A sailor who repairs electronic equipment. Suggested by user X-USN-DS1 .

Un-Ass -- To move immediately or leave one's current position.

Uncle Sam's Canoe Club -- A U.S. Navy term for the U.S. Coast Guard.

Unit Identification Code -- An alphanumeric, six-character string that identifies all active, reserve, and guard units of the United States military.

Voice in the Sky -- Term referring to military base announcements broadcast over speakers. Recommended by user MrsMSgt.

Voluntold -- An assignment that is technically voluntary but understood to be mandatory.

Weapons of Mass Destruction -- Weapons that can cause destruction or death beyond the ability of conventional weapons. These typically are nuclear, biological, chemical, radiological or high-yield explosive in nature. This definition does not include the vehicle, or transportation method, of delivering the weapon.

Zone of Action -- A smaller section of a larger area. Typically these are under the purview of a tactical unit, usually during an offensive maneuver.

Zoomie -- Term used by non-flying service members for anyone who operates a flying vehicle.

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  • Joint Duty Program FAQs

Joint Duty Program Frequently Asked Questions

The DHS Joint Duty Program is an intra- and inter-departmental program which offers civilian personnel professional and developmental opportunities. Joint Duty Assignments enhance operations and mission execution through unity of effort and collaboration.

What is the DHS Joint Duty Program?

The DHS Joint Duty Program offers non-reimbursable Joint Duty Assignments up to one year, both inside and outside the National Capital Region. These multi-component, multi-faceted assignments cross DHS and federal agency operations to build employee skillsets, increasing value to their agency and the federal government as a whole. The DHS Joint Duty Program connects federal employees across the government to professional development opportunities at DHS.

How do supervisors and hiring managers apply to post a joint duty assignment opportunity?

Supervisors may apply to post a joint duty assignment opportunity by completing the DHS Assignment Opportunity Form 250-01 and providing the following:

  • Assignment Type: virtual or traditional (onsite). In a virtual Joint Duty Assignment, the employee works from the employing office (physically) or teleworks from home full-time, a standard 40-hour work week.
  • Assignment description and required job qualifications.
  • Digital signatures from a first-line and second-line supervisor. Note: Supervisor’s approval is required to submit an opportunity.

Send completed forms to [email protected] .

How do interested federal employees apply for a joint duty assignment?

View current DHS Joint Duty Opportunities on USAJOBS and follow the instructions below to apply:

  • DHS Application Form 250-02
  • Submit a complete application package for each assignment you apply to in USAJOBS.

What is a virtual joint duty assignment?

On a virtual joint duty assignment, an employee may either telework from their employing office or from home full-time. Hiring managers have the option to advertise virtual joint duty assignments for the duration of a detail or until local offices reopen for employees.

Can a supervisor apply to post a opportunity to backfill the position of an employee on a joint duty assignment?

Yes, an employing organization supervisor can apply to post a joint opportunity to backfill the position of an employee on a Joint Duty Assignment. Complete the DHS Assignment Opportunity Form 250-01 .

Why should federal employees participate in the DHS Joint Duty Program?

The DHS Joint Duty Program offers distinct career benefits for Federal employees, including rewarding experiences, leadership development, and networking. The program offers participants with opportunities:

  • to enhance mission execution;
  • to expand professional networks through agency collaboration thus supporting unity of effort and enhancing collaboration between agencies; and
  • to amplify leadership and professional development.

What do federal employees receive upon completion of a joint duty assignment?

Upon satisfactory completion of a Joint Duty Assignment, the employee will receive an official Certificate of Achievement from the Director of the DHS Joint Duty Program.

What are the eligibility requirements to apply for a joint duty assignment?

To apply for a Joint Duty Assignment, interested applicants must:

  • be a GS-12, 13, 14, 15 or equivalent;
  • have supervisory approval;
  • be a permanent, full-time federal employee;
  • have an “achieved expectations” or “proficient” rating on their most recent performance evaluation; and
  • have no outstanding disciplinary action or grievance.

The DHS Joint Duty Program does not apply to members of the military service or contractors.

How do federal employees find available opportunities?

Interested federal employees can view current DHS Joint Duty Assignment Opportunities on USAJOBS or visit the Open Opportunities website (login with a USAJOBS account is required).

Who is responsible for any costs related to meals, housing/lodging, or travel during a joint duty assignments?

Federal employees selected for a joint duty assignment are responsible for any costs related to meals, and or housing/lodging. A participants employing organization may pay for a temporary change of station. Travel funding related to the joint duty assignment is the responsibility of the host organization.

Who is responsible for an employee's performance evaluation on a joint duty assignment?

The employing organization supervisor is responsible for overseeing the performance evaluation that the participant already has in place at his or her permanent duty location.

Who is responsible for an employee's time and attendance during a joint duty assignment?

The participant's supervisor at his or her permanent duty location is responsible for certifying time and attendance.

What is the Joint Duty Program Memorandum of Agreement?

After a federal employee is selected for an assignment, the DHS Joint Duty Program Office sends the Memorandum of Agreement to the employing organization, the gaining organization, and the participant. The Memorandum of Agreement includes a start date for the selected employee and the roles and responsibilities for the the employing organization, the gaining organization, and the employee. The signature blocks in the Memorandum of Agreement must be signed off and returned to the DHS Joint Duty Program Office within 5 business days.

What are the requirements to complete a joint duty assignment?

During a joint duty assignment, participants must:

  • Complete the DHS Joint Duty Program Training Course 15 days prior to starting an assignment.
  • Establish assignment objectives within the first 30 days of the assignment;
  • Complete a self-assessment of the duties performed at the mid-point of the assignment; and
  • Complete a final review within the last 30 days of the assignment.

What is the purpose of the DHS Joint Duty Program training course?

The DHS Joint Duty Program training course provides selected employees with the knowledge, resources, and information to successfully complete a Joint Duty Assignment.

What are the three phases in the DHS Joint Duty Program Assignment Progress Plan?

The three phases in the DHS Joint Duty Program Assignment Progress Plan are:

  • Phase 1: Establish assignment objectives within the first 30 days of the assignment;
  • Phase 2: Complete a self-assessment of the duties performed at the mid-point of the assignment; and
  • Phase 3: Complete a final review within the last 30 days of the assignment.
  • Job Opportunity
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General Officer Assignments

The chief of staff of the Army announces the following general officer assignments:

Lt. Gen. (Promotable) Charles R. Hamilton, deputy chief of staff, G-4, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C., to commanding general, U.S. Army Materiel Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama.

Maj. Gen. Christopher G. Beck, deputy commanding general, III Corps, Fort Hood, Texas, to commanding general, U.S. Army Maneuver Support Center of Excellence and Fort Leonard Wood, Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri.

Maj. Gen. Peter N. Benchoff, chief of staff, U.S. Army Pacific, Fort Shafter, Hawaii, to director, Program Analysis and Evaluation, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-8, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C.

Maj. Gen. James E. Bonner, commanding general, U.S. Army Maneuver Support Center of Excellence and Fort Leonard Wood, Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, to deputy commanding general, U.S. Army North, Joint Base San Antonio, Texas.

Maj. Gen. Timothy D. Brown, director, J-2, U.S. European Command, Germany, to commanding general, U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command, Fort Belvoir, Virginia.

Maj. Gen. Glenn A. Dean III, program executive officer, Ground Combat Systems, Warren, Michigan, to deputy commanding general, Acquisition and Systems Management, U.S. Army Futures Command, Austin, Texas.

Maj. Gen. David J. Francis, director, J-3 Operations/Cyber, U.S. Africa Command, Germany, to chief of staff, U.S. Africa Command, Germany.

Maj. Gen. William H. Graham Jr., deputy commanding general of civil and emergency operations, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Washington, D.C., to deputy chief of engineers and deputy commanding general, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Washington, D.C.

Maj. Gen. David C. Hill, commandant, U.S. Army War College, Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania, to deputy commanding general for civil and emergency operations, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Washington, D.C.

Maj. Gen. Mark H. Landes, commanding general, First Army Division East, Fort Knox, Kentucky, to commandant, U.S. Army War College, Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania.

Maj. Gen. Allan M. Pepin, commanding general, Military District of Washington; and commander, Joint Force Headquarters-National Capital Region, Washington, D.C., to chief of staff, U.S. Northern Command, Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado.

Maj. Gen. Walter T. Rugen, director, Future of Vertical Lift Cross Functional Team, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, to director, Army Aviation, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-3/5/7, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C.

Maj. Gen. William D. Taylor, director, Army Aviation, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-3/5/7, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C., to commanding general, 2nd Infantry Division (Combined), Eighth Army, Republic of Korea.

Maj. Gen. Joel B. Vowell, commanding general, U.S. Army Japan and I Corps (Forward), Japan, to commander, Combined Joint Task Force-Operation Inherent Resolve, Operation Inherent Resolve, Iraq.

Maj. Gen. Darren L. Werner, commanding general, U.S. Army Tank-Automotive and Armaments Command, Warren, Michigan, to deputy chief of staff for logistics and operations, U.S. Army Materiel Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama.

Maj. Gen. David B. Womack, deputy commanding general, V Corps, Germany, to commanding general, U.S. Army Japan and I Corps (Forward), Japan.

Brig. Gen. Richard T. Appelhans, director of intelligence, U.S. Forces Korea: and deputy director of intelligence, Combined Forces Command, Republic of Korea, to commanding general and Commandant, U.S. Army Intelligence Center of Excellence and Fort Huachuca, Fort Huachuca, Arizona.

Brig. Gen. Phillip C. Baker, deputy commanding general (Support), 25th Infantry Division, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, to director, Future of Vertical Lift Cross Functional Team, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama.

Brig. Gen. James B. Bartholomees, deputy chief of staff, G-3/5/7, U.S. Army Pacific, Fort Shafter, Hawaii, to chief of staff, U.S. Army Pacific, Fort Shafter, Hawaii.

Brig. Gen. Jonathan C. Byrom, commander, 2nd Multi-Domain Task Force, U.S. Army Europe-Africa, Germany, to commanding general, U.S. Army Combat Readiness Center; and director of Army safety, Fort Rucker, Alabama.

Brig. Gen. Dale S. Crockett, commandant, U.S. Army Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear School, U.S. Army Maneuver Support Center of Excellence, Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, to deputy commanding general (Operations), Eighth Army, Republic of Korea.

Brig. Gen. Jason A. Curl, deputy commanding general (Operations), 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry), Fort Drum, New York, to director, CJ3, Combined Joint Task Force-Operation Inherent Resolve, Operation Inherent Resolve, Iraq.

Brig. Gen. John M. Cushing, deputy commanding general, U.S. Army Recruiting Command, Fort Knox, Kentucky, to commanding general, Combat Capabilities Development Command, U.S. Army Futures Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland.

Brig. Gen. Thomas M. Feltey, commandant, U.S. Army Armor School, U.S. Army Maneuver Center of Excellence, Fort Benning, Georgia, to deputy commanding general, III Corps, Fort Hood, Texas.

Brig. Gen. Andrew C. Gainey, deputy commanding general (Operations), 3rd Division (France), France, to commanding general, 56th Artillery Command, U.S. Army Europe-Africa, Germany.

Brig. Gen. Kimberly A. Peeples, commanding general, Great Lakes and Ohio River Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Cincinnati, Ohio, to commanding general, Mississippi Valley Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg, Mississippi.

Brig. Gen. Mark C. Quander, commandant of cadets, U.S. Military Academy, West Point, New York, to commanding general, Great Lakes and Ohio River Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Brig. Gen. Richard J. Quirk IV, senior defense official and defense attaché, U.S. Defense Attaché Office, United Arab Emirates, to senior defense official and defense attaché, U.S. Defense Attaché Office, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

Brig. Gen. Ronald R. Ragin, deputy commander for support, Security Assistance Group-Ukraine, Germany, to commanding general, 21st Theater Sustainment Command, U.S. Army Europe-Africa, Germany.

Brig. Gen. Lori L. Robinson, deputy commanding general (Support), 2nd Infantry Division (Combined), Eighth Army, Republic of Korea, to commandant of cadets, U.S. Military Academy, West Point, New York.

Brig. Gen. Monte L. Rone, deputy chief of staff, Operations, Multinational Corps Northeast, NATO, Poland, to commandant, U.S. Army Infantry School, U.S. Army Maneuver Center of Excellence; and director, Future Soldier Lethality Cross Functional Team, Army Futures Command, Fort Benning, Georgia.

Brig. Gen. Philip J. Ryan, commanding general, U.S. Army Special Operations Aviation Command; and deputy commanding general, Futures, U.S. Special Operations Command, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, to commander, Special Operations Joint Task Force-Levant, Operation Inherent Resolve, Kuwait.

Brig. Gen. Eric P. Shirley, commander, Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Defense Logistics Agency, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to commanding general, 1st Sustainment Command (Theater), U.S. Army Central, Fort Knox, Kentucky.

Brig. Gen. Michael J. Simmering, deputy commanding general (Operations), 1st Armored Division, Fort Bliss, Texas, to commandant, U.S. Army Armor School, U.S. Army Maneuver Center of Excellence, Fort Benning, Georgia.

Brig. Gen. Jason C. Slider, director, Mission Command Center of Excellence, U.S. Army Combined Arms Center, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, to deputy commanding general (Operations), 3rd Division (France), France.

Brig. Gen. Colin P. Tuley, deputy director, Strategy, Plans and Policy, J-5, U.S. Central Command, MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, to deputy commanding general, XVIII Airborne Corps, Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

Brig. Gen. Jeffrey A. VanAntwerp, deputy commanding general (Operations), 25th Infantry Division, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, to deputy chief of staff, G-3/5/7, U.S. Army Pacific, Fort Shafter, Hawaii.

Brig. Gen. John W. Weidner, deputy director, Plans, J-5, U.S. Strategic Command, Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska, to chief of staff, U.S. Forces Korea, Republic of Korea.

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SK POP

What does 'Private' Army ranking mean? Details explored as images from BTS' Jungkook's trainee graduation ceremony surface online

Posted: January 17, 2024 | Last updated: January 17, 2024

BTS member Jeon Jungkook enlisted in the South Korean military alongside bandmate Park Jimin on December 11, 2023, to fulfill his mandatory service. Almost a month later, on January 17, 2024, some images of the 26-year-old singer in uniform surfaced online. The images were reportedly from his military graduation ceremony that was held on the same day.

Both the golden maknae and Jimin graduated with distinction after completing their basic five weeks of military training. Following this, the recruits will be deployed to other divisions or units to carry out their military duties for a required period of 18 to 21 months.

However, fans are happy to see the singer in uniform, they're also curious about the military designation 'Private'.

Fans curious to know Jungkook's military ranking in the Republic of Korea Armed Forces

On January 17, 2024, a X account posted an image of Jungkook in his military uniform. The BTS singer could be seen saluting as part of the graduation ceremony ritual. The user, @young__JK, wrote on X that a fellow military recruit uploaded Jungkook's images online with a caption written on the image disclosing the idol's military designation.

"The pics were uploaded by the trainee. The caption in Korean on these pics are, "Jungkook no matter who looks at" and "He is cool. Except that he is a Private(army ranking).""

The lowest rank of enlisted men in most militaries is "private." In the descending sequence of power, levels in the South Korean military are classified as junior enlisted (or "Byeong"), commissioned officer, warrant officer, non-commissioned officer, or non-commissioned officer. General officers ("Jangseong"; 장성), field-grade officers ("Yeonggwan"; 영관/), and company-grade officers ("Wigwan"; 위관) comprise the ranks of commissioned officers.

In addition, the official titles of the South Korean Armed Forces' three branches-the Army, Navy, and Air Force-are identical in Hangul. The Republic of Korea Armed Forces use the South Korean military ranks as its crest. South Korean rankings are influenced by the US owing to the country's close military ties and the existence of US Forces Korea.

Hence, both Jungkook and Jimin are currently designated as Private and would work up the ranks throughout their service tenure. Similar to how BTS members Jin and J-Hope earned their promotions in the military since their enlistment in December 2022 and April 2023, respectively.

Fans took to X to react to the new images of Jungkook that surfaced online. Some were curious to learn about the intricacies of the "Private" designation of Jungkook in the military, while others swooned over the singer's uniform-clad images.

Most importantly, there are differences in the grades that correspond to private in the various branches of the US armed forces. For example, an airman in the US Air Force and a sailor in the US Navy.

A private in the US, German, and French forces is subordinate to a private first class, who is subordinate to a corporal. The People's Republic of China's army places the private second class below the private first class.

"They will be in the same division": Fans rejoice as Jimin and Jungkook deployed to the 5th division after their graduation ceremony

BTS' Jimin announced his graduation from a five-week fundamental training course in a handwritten letter that he posted on Weverse on January 17, 2024. Meanwhile, Jungkook, sent a one-word message, "Unity," on Weverse on January 17. His one-word statement quickly gained popularity on social media, with followers making "Jungkook came home" a trend.

The duo's graduation ceremony came right on the heels of BTS members Namjoon and Taehyung's graduation ceremony on January 16, 2024. Both the members graduated as two of the six "Elite Soldiers" and even posted images on their respective Instagram handles.

However, Jimin and the GOLDEN singer did not do so since they completed their military training at a different military base that did not allow the use of phones or cameras on a ceremonial day. An online user, @Bunnybear_4evr, translated another Korean netizen's post on X and wrote:

"Unlike Seokjin's enlistment day, recently on enlistment days for 5th division including Jungkook and Jimin's enlistment days, families were allowed to enter only by putting stickers on their cell phone cameras to prevent family members from taking pictures inside. But I don't know what the graduation ceremony will be like today... It's a graduation ceremony, so I thought they let families take pictures inside."

Nevertheless, fans congratulated Jungkook and Jimin for graduating and getting deployed together to the 5th division, where their bandmate Jin is already serving his duty as a Sergeant.

Meanwhile, Kim Namjoon has been deployed to the 15th Infantry Unit of the 2nd Corps of the Republic of Korea Armed Forces, according to a Twitter account. Similarly, Kim Taehyung hasn't been deployed to any unit yet since he had previously applied to the Special Mission Task Force, or SDT, unit that carries out counterterrorism missions, tracks military deserters, and more.

Taehyung is currently transferred to the Army Capital Defense School to get an additional three weeks of intense and grueling training before he gets deployed as a Special Mission Unit soldier.

All BTS members intend to resume group activity in 2025 since all of them are currently serving in the military.

What does 'Private' Army ranking mean? Details explored as images from BTS' Jungkook's trainee graduation ceremony surface online

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What is a military assignment?

A military assignment is the placement or deployment of military personnel to a specific location or duty, often for a predetermined period of time. These assignments can vary widely in terms of location, duration, and specific tasks and responsibilities.

Military assignments can include everything from combat deployments to peacekeeping missions, training exercises, embassy duty, and various other specialized roles. Assignments may be domestic or international, and can last anywhere from a few weeks to several years.

FAQs about Military Assignments

1. what factors determine military assignments.

Military assignments are typically determined by the needs of the military, the specific skills and qualifications of the individual service member, and the overall mission and objectives of the military organization.

2. Can military personnel request specific assignments?

In some cases, military personnel may be able to submit requests for specific assignments, but ultimately, the final decision is made by the military leadership based on the needs of the organization.

3. How long do military assignments typically last?

The duration of military assignments can vary widely depending on the specific mission and requirements. Some assignments may last only a few weeks or months, while others can extend for several years.

4. What are some common types of military assignments?

Common types of military assignments include combat deployments, peacekeeping missions, training exercises, embassy duty, and various specialized roles such as intelligence, logistics, and medical support.

5. Do military assignments always involve combat?

No, not all military assignments involve combat. Many assignments involve non-combat roles such as training, logistical support, humanitarian aid, and medical assistance.

6. Can military personnel bring their families on assignments?

This depends on the specific assignment and location. Some assignments are suitable for accompanied tours, while others may be unaccompanied due to safety or logistical reasons.

7. How are military assignments communicated to personnel?

Military personnel are typically informed of their assignments through official channels, often with advance notice to allow for necessary preparations and planning.

8. Are military assignments voluntary or mandatory?

Both voluntary and mandatory assignments exist in the military, with some positions being filled through volunteer applications and others being assigned based on the needs of the organization.

9. Can military personnel refuse certain assignments?

In most cases, military personnel are expected to fulfill the assignments they are given. Refusing an assignment can have serious consequences and is generally not permitted except in extreme circumstances.

10. Do military assignments offer any additional benefits or incentives?

Some military assignments may offer additional benefits or incentives such as hazard pay, special training opportunities, or unique experiences in different parts of the world. However, these vary depending on the specific assignment and circumstances.

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About Robert Carlson

Robert has over 15 years in Law Enforcement, with the past eight years as a senior firearms instructor for the largest police department in the South Eastern United States. Specializing in Active Shooters, Counter-Ambush, Low-light, and Patrol Rifles, he has trained thousands of Law Enforcement Officers in firearms. A U.S Air Force combat veteran with over 25 years of service specialized in small arms and tactics training. He is the owner of Brave Defender Training Group LLC, providing advanced firearms and tactical training.

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What Does ‘Military Grade’ Really Mean?

Lots of consumer products boast of being durable enough for government use. But are they really?

By Jake Rossen | Jan 15, 2024

'Military grade' can create confusion.

Search for the term “phone case” on Amazon and you’ll be greeted with a daunting number: over 100,000 results. You can, of course, narrow it down by color or design, but case manufacturers are also keen on differentiating their products in another way: Claiming their case is “military grade.”

The consumer is left to infer their phone could survive a shelling or chemical warfare—or at least being dropped on the kitchen floor. You can also find the term on everything from vehicles to LED flashlights to baseball bats . But what does “military grade” really mean?

The short answer: Whatever manufacturers want.

Like a lot of vaguely worded consumer product labels, “military grade” can be applied by anyone for any reason. There is no third party—much less the United States government—evaluating it for durability. It’s nothing more than a marketing strategy meant to persuade people into thinking an item is trustworthy enough for military operations.

It’s true there is a military standard developed by the Department of Defense, dubbed MIL-STD-810, which lays out testing protocols for equipment intended for government use. And it’s also true that product manufacturers can apply those protocols to their own products. But it’s by no means mandatory to apply any or all of them. More importantly, manufacturers conduct their own testing. It’s not as though a product has passed or failed a government-supervised inspection. “Military grade” can simply mean it measured up to at least one standard for materials, shock absorption, temperature resistance, vibrations, or other variable. It can also mean someone did no testing at all.

It’s difficult to pin down when the phrase came into widespread use. Ads for a 1990 Sumo home audio component touted “military-grade specifications.” In recent years, Ford has hyped its F-150 truck’s “military-grade, aluminum alloy” body. It’s the same alloy, Ford states, used in some military vehicles.

Writing for Task & Purpose in 2022, author Jeff Schogol argued that a product that strictly adhered to military standards may not be such a good idea anyway. Contracts for simple products are often awarded to the lowest bidders, who may not have an eye on product quality. The result can be a disappointing end-user experience, like sleeping bags that don’t keep anyone warm or earplugs that don’t work.

“For those who have been issued gear only to see it fall apart after the most gentle of wear and tear, something that is ‘military grade’ is ‘a piece of sh-t,’” Schogol writes.

That might be a bit too cynical. Some companies use MIL-STD-810 as a litmus test that results in a demonstrably more durable product. Laptop maker Asus, for example, puts select models through environmental testing that make for a rugged product, though they’re quick to note it “does not indicate a particular fitness for military use.”

When it comes to phone cases, there’s another caveat: While military-style testing might reduce the chances of visible damage, not all companies test for damage to internal components. A case that saves a screen may not save the microphone inside the phone.

In the end, “military grade” holds about as much weight as “space-age materials,” or “world famous.” It’s probably better to focus on the most enduring of consumer slogans: “buyer beware.”

Have you got a Big Question you’d like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at [email protected] .

How does the military assign?

The military assigns personnel based on their skills, experience, and the needs of the service branch. This process includes consideration of individual preferences, career development goals, and the overall requirements of the military.

How does the military assign personnel to different units or roles?

Can military personnel request specific assignments, do military members have any say in where they are assigned, how often do military assignments change, what factors are considered when assigning military personnel, can military members transfer to different units or branches, are overseas assignments common in the military, do military assignments take into account family circumstances, how are deployments and combat assignments determined, what happens if a military member is unhappy with their assignment, how do military members find out about their assignment, is there any flexibility in military assignments for personal reasons, can military members influence their own assignments, are there any perks or incentives associated with certain military assignments, how do special operations assignments differ from regular military assignments.

Personnel are assigned based on a variety of factors including skill sets, experience, preference, and the needs of the military branch.

Bulk Ammo for Sale at Lucky Gunner

Yes, military personnel can submit preferences for specific assignments, but ultimately the decision is based on the needs of the military.

While they can make their preferences known, the final decision on assignment rests with the military leadership.

Assignments can vary in length, but they typically change every few years depending on career progression and military needs.

Skills, experience, career development goals, and the overall needs of the military are all considered in the assignment process.

Yes, military members can request transfers to different units or even different branches, but approval is based on the needs of the military.

Overseas assignments are not uncommon in the military, especially for certain occupational specialties.

While the military considers family circumstances, the needs of the service branch often take priority in the assignment process.

Deployments and combat assignments are based on military operational requirements and individual skills and experience.

While the military considers individual preferences, ultimately the needs of the service branch take priority in the assignment process.

Military members are typically notified of their assignment through official channels, often through their chain of command.

There may be some flexibility for personal reasons, but it ultimately depends on the needs of the military and the specific circumstances.

Military members can influence their assignments to some extent by expressing their preferences and career goals, but the final decision rests with the military leadership.

Certain assignments may come with perks or incentives, such as special duty pay or unique opportunities for career development.

Special operations assignments often require additional training and qualifications, and they are typically based on specialized skills and experience.

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Gary is a U.S. ARMY OIF veteran who served in Iraq from 2007 to 2008. He followed in the honored family tradition with his father serving in the U.S. Navy during Vietnam, his brother serving in Afghanistan, and his Grandfather was in the U.S. Army during World War II. Due to his service, Gary received a VA disability rating of 80%. But he still enjoys writing which allows him a creative outlet where he can express his passion for firearms. He is currently single, but is "on the lookout!' So watch out all you eligible females; he may have his eye on you...

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IMAGES

  1. The Air Force Enlisted Assignment Process

    what is a military assignment

  2. Military TDY: Temporary Duty Assignment Explained

    what is a military assignment

  3. What Does TDY Stand for in the Military?

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  6. HOW OFFICER ASSIGNMENTS WORK!

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VIDEO

  1. Zim Military has only ONE assignment or else

  2. High Alert: US Air Force deploys more F-15s to Middle East

COMMENTS

  1. Military TDY: Temporary Duty Assignment Explained

    Temporary Duty Assignments (TDY) are relatively short term military orders where you leave your home station. Image: Army.com The U.S. Military has three primary types of military travel orders: Permanent Change of Station (PCS) Temporary Duty (TDY) Deployments Orders

  2. Assignment

    Acronyms Assignment Awards Decorations and Ribbons Dress and Appearance Fitness Program ID Card Entitlements Military Tuition Assistance Program Military Personnel Records Promotion Enlisted Promotions Officer Promotions Post-9/11 GI Bill Retention Retirement Civ Special Retirements Squadron Command Team Nomination & Hiring Guide

  3. IPPS-A Update: PCS Updates, Assignment Errors and Solutions, HR Pro

    Adjusting the assignment start date instead of using the in-transit grid will cause the absence request to be out of sync with the assignment, and makes the in-transit grid unusable. You must manually adjust the absence requests before arriving the Soldier. Assignment Errors and Solutions Early Report.

  4. What is a military assignment; and how does one get assigned?

    A military assignment refers to a specific task or location that a service member is given to carry out. Assignments in the military are typically determined by a combination of the service member's skills, experience, and the needs of the military branch they belong to.

  5. Military TDY: What it is, How it Works, and What to Expect

    Military TDY is a common type of assignment in the United States military that requires service members to travel away from their home station for a temporary period of time. TDY can be for a variety of reasons, including training, special assignments, and mission-related travel. Service members selected for TDY can expect to receive orders ...

  6. Temporary Duty Assignments

    Get to know the various types of Temporary Duty Assignment (TDY) or Temporary Assignment Duty (TAD) to keep your finances and sanity from teetering into the red when you are on TDY orders. Fully understanding your military assignments and benefits is the benchmark of a seasoned servicemember. Pay increases or decreases, what per diem covers ...

  7. First Duty and Future Assignments in the Military

    Updated on 11/04/18 First duty station selection is made (in either basic training or technical school/AIT/A-School), based upon your preferences, and the needs of the service. While the services will consider your preferences, the overriding deciding factor is where the military needs you the most.

  8. What is a military assignment?

    A military assignment is a specific duty or task given to a member of the armed forces to accomplish within a certain period of time and in a designated location. Contents [ show] What are the different types of military assignments?

  9. Glossary of Military Terms

    The list of terms below is from Today's Military online guide by the U.S. Department of Defense. Active Duty Continuous duty on a daily basis. Comparable to "full time" as used in reference to a civilian job. Allowances Money, other than basic pay, to compensate in certain situations for expenses, such as meals, rent, clothing, and travel.

  10. Military Jobs and Occupational Specialties

    ARTICLE Military Jobs: Your Future Career in the Armed Forces 8 minute read • Nov. 4, 2021 Enlisting in the military can help you achieve your career goals. In fact, there are even some jobs that you can only do as a service member, like drive a tank or fly a fighter jet. Here's what you need to know about your future military career.

  11. What is the difference between military deployment and military assignment?

    Military assignment, on the other hand, refers to the placement of military personnel at a specific location or unit for a longer period of time, such as a permanent change of station. Contents [ show] FAQs about Military Deployment and Assignment 1. What is the purpose of military deployment?

  12. PDF Department of The Air Force

    updates to Assignment Availability Codes and Assignment Limitation Codes reducing the use of acronyms, limiting the scope of this publication to the Department of the Air Force guidance, and lowering compliance tiers where possible.

  13. Military Terms, Military Jargon, Slang

    Defines getting verbally reprimanded. Recommended by user Joe Trejo. Anymouse -- A lockbox on Navy ships where sailors may drop anonymous suggestions. Ass -- Armored vehicles such as Strykers and...

  14. PDF Tour Lengths and Tours of Duty OCONUS

    The standard tour length for a DoD Service member stationed OCONUS is 36 months in an accompanied tour and 24 months in an unaccompanied tour. Hawaii and Alaska are exceptions, with a tour length of 36 months for both accompanied and unaccompanied tours. Military Departments or Combatant Commands may provide conclusive evidence that a specific ...

  15. Frequently Asked Questions

    Supervisors may apply to post a joint duty assignment opportunity by completing the DHS Assignment Opportunity Form 250-01 and providing the following:. Assignment Type: virtual or traditional (onsite). In a virtual Joint Duty Assignment, the employee works from the employing office (physically) or teleworks from home full-time, a standard 40-hour work week.

  16. What is military assignment?

    A military assignment refers to the placement of a service member at a specific location to fulfill a specific purpose or role within the military. What are the different types of military assignments?

  17. General Officer Assignments

    The chief of staff of the Army announces the following general officer assignments: Lt. Gen. (Promotable) Charles R. Hamilton, deputy chief of staff, G-4, U.S. Army ...

  18. MyNavy Assignment

    MyNavy Assignment (MNA) is designed and used by Sailors, Command Career Counselors, and command personnel. The Web-based system allows Sailors to view available jobs and make their own applications or make applications through their Command Career Counselor. Sailors can view MNA through a secure website located at https://mynavyassignment.dc3n ...

  19. What is military assignment?

    A military assignment is a task or duty given to a member of the armed forces. It often involves a specific mission, deployment, or placement within a unit. Military assignments can range from combat operations to logistical support, and can be temporary or long-term. Check 5,000+ New Gun Deals HERE FAQs about Military Assignments 1.

  20. What does military assignment mean?

    A military assignment refers to a specific duty or task given to a member of the military. It can include a variety of roles, such as deployment to a specific location, a special project, or a temporary duty assignment. Contents [ show] What is a military assignment?

  21. What does 'Private' Army ranking mean? Details explored as images ...

    The user, @young__JK, wrote on X that a fellow military recruit uploaded Jungkook's images online with a caption written on the image disclosing the idol's military designation.

  22. What is a military assignment?

    A military assignment is the placement or deployment of military personnel to a specific location or duty, often for a predetermined period of time. These assignments can vary widely in terms of location, duration, and specific tasks and responsibilities.

  23. What Does 'Military Grade' Really Mean?

    More importantly, manufacturers conduct their own testing. It's not as though a product has passed or failed a government-supervised inspection. "Military grade" can simply mean it measured ...

  24. What is a military assignment called?

    A military assignment is called a deployment, where service members are sent to a specific location to fulfill a mission or task. Contents [ show] What are some common types of military assignments? Some common types of military assignments include combat deployments, peacekeeping missions, and training exercises.

  25. How does the military assign?

    January 4, 2024 by Gary McCloud The military assigns personnel based on their skills, experience, and the needs of the service branch. This process includes consideration of individual preferences, career development goals, and the overall requirements of the military. See 3,000+ New Gun Deals HERE Contents [ show]