phd programs in toronto

Professional and Graduate Programs

Build on your undergraduate degree with U of T’s rich selection of professional and graduate programs. While some programs require university preparation, others require a university degree. See faculty websites for specific admission information.

School of Graduate Studies

U of T is where Canada goes for answers to its big questions – answers that are being provided by faculty and students of Canada’s largest and most prestigious graduate school. With unparalleled research and education facilities as well as outstanding libraries, our world-class graduate students are studying and working with the most productive research faculty in Canada. Our graduate students’ research is recognized internationally, published in leading journals; they also lead the nation in winning external research grants.

Learn more about our over 175 research and professional master’s and doctoral programs across more than 80 departments, or explore the potential for interdisciplinary research in more than forty collaborative programs. By pursuing graduate studies at U of T, you’ll be learning first-hand from some of the world’s top researchers, scholars, and professionals as they work to solve the most urgent questions of the 21st century. Under their guidance, you’ll develop the skills and reputation you need to launch into a lifelong path of intellectual discovery and professional success.

Length of program: varies Phone Number: 416.978.6614 Programs : www.uoft.me/gradprograms Information: www.uoft.me/gradstudies

A complete university degree required

Architecture, Landscape, and Design

The John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design (Daniels) focuses on interdisciplinary training and research to test the limits of 21st century design.

Length of Program: Varies Phone Number: 416.978.5038 Information: www.uoft.me/daniels

A complete university degree is required for graduate programs

Biomedical Communications

A Faculty of Medicine program, biomedical communications offers an interdisciplinary graduate program in the design and evaluation of visual media in medicine and science.

Length of Program: 2 Years Phone Number: 905.569.4849 Information: www.uoft.me/biomedcomm

One of the foremost dental research centres in Canada, U of T’s Faculty of Dentistry has an international reputation for scholarly activity, in both the clinical and biological sciences.

Length of Program: 4 Years Phone Number: 416.979.4901 ext. 4373 Information: www.uoft.me/Dentistry

Some university education required

The Ontario Institute for Studies in Education is an all-graduate institute. We offer programs in curriculum, teaching and learning; applied psychology and human development; leadership, higher and adult education; and social justice education.

Length of Program: Varies Phone Number: 416.978.1848 Information: www.oise.utoronto.ca/oise/Academic_Programs/index.html

The Faculty of Forestry offers an innovative, interdisciplinary course-based Master of Forest Conservation program, which is accredited by the Canadian Forestry Accreditation Board, and includes a three-month internship and opportunities for international study.

Length of Program: 16 months Phone Number: 416.946.7952 Information: www.uoft.me/forestry

Information

The iSchool develops professionals, grounded in practice, policy and research, in the fields of information, knowledge management, digital communication and curation, libraries, archives and museums for the 21st century.

Length of Program: Varies Phone Number: 416.978.3234 Information: www.ischool.utoronto.ca

The Faculty of Law is one of the oldest professional faculties at U of T and has a long and illustrious history of educating the best lawyers and legal scholars in Canada.

L ength of Program: 3 Years Phone Number: 416.978.3716 Information: www.law.utoronto.ca

Institute for Management & Innovation

The Institute for Management & Innovation is the collaborative centre for management education at U of T Mississauga providing professional masters programs in accounting, biotechnology, innovation and sustainability.

Length of Program: Varies Phone Number: 905.569.4565 Information: www.utm.utoronto.ca/imi

Rotman School of Management

U of T’s Rotman School has set out to redesign business education for the 21st century and become one of the world’s top-tier business schools in preparing business leaders of tomorrow.

Length of Program: Varies Phone Number: 416.978.3499 Information: www.rotman.utoronto.ca

Medical Radiation Sciences

Jointly offered by the Faculty of Medicine and The Michener Institute for Applied Health Sciences, the Medical Radiation Sciences Program integrates proficiency in diagnostic and therapeutic patient care with advanced technology.

Length of Program: 3 Years Phone Number: 416.978.7837 Information: www.uoft.me/medicalradiationsciences

U of T’s Faculty of Medicine and affiliated hospitals are among the leading health sciences centres for research and education in North America, with a global reputation for excellence and innovation.

Length of Program: 4 Years Phone Number: 416.978.7928 Information: www.uoft.me/studymedicine

The Lawrence Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing ranks among the premier nursing programs in the world in both education and research.

Length of Program: 2 Years Phone Number: 416.978.2865 Information: www.uoft.me/bloombergnursing

Occupational Science & Occupational Therapy

A Faculty of Medicine program, occupational science and therapy prepares students to become innovative occupational therapists, clinician scientists and educators.

Length of Program: 2 Years Phone Number: 416.946.8571 Information: www.uoft.me/ot

The Doctor of Pharmacy program at the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy prepares graduates to become leaders in medication therapy management, improve patient outcomes, and work effectively within health care teams.

Length of Program: 4 Years Phone Number: 416.978.3967 Information: www.uoft.me/pharmacy

Physical Therapy

A program within the Faculty of Medicine, the Master of Science in Physical Therapy develops highly competent academic practitioners who demonstrate the essential competencies of a practicing physical therapist in a wide range of settings upon graduation.

Length of Program: 2 Years Phone Number: 416.946.8641 Information: www.physicaltherapy.utoronto.ca

Physician Assistant

Trained in the Faculty of Medicine, Physician Assistants are health care professionals who practice under the supervision of a licensed physician. In their role, PAs are able to conduct physical examinations, order and interpret tests, diagnose and treat illnesses, and more.

Length of Program: 2 Years Phone Number: 416.978.1676 Information: www.paconsortium.ca

Dalla Lana School of Public Health

The Dalla Lana School of Public Health is Canada’s largest and most comprehensive public health school that is informing practice and influencing government policy in population health, prevention and health-care systems.

Length of Program: 2 Years Phone Number: 416.978.2058 Information: www.dlsph.utoronto.ca

Social Work

The Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work has been on the cutting edge of education, policy, research and practice in the field of social work for 100 years.

Length of Program: Varies Phone Number: 416.978.3257 Information: www.uoft.me/socialwork

Speech-Language Pathology

The Department of Speech-Language Pathology in the Faculty of Medicine prepares highly competent clinical professionals and researchers who find employment in a variety of settings related to assessment, intervention and/or study of communication, swallowing and hearing disorders.

Length of Program: 2 Years Phone Number: 416.946.5456 Information: www.uoft.me/slp

U of T’s affiliate the Toronto School of Theology provides graduate theological education in academic or professional programs and shapes men and women for faithful and creative leadership in the mission of the Church.

Length of Program: Varies Phone Number: 416.978.4039 Information: www.tst.edu

Find out about  co-ops, internships, field school ,  First Year Foundations : The  One Programs, and other enhanced academic opportunities available on all three campuses.

Applicants should rank their choices in order of preference. You will receive separate decisions for each Faculty/Division to which you apply (i.e. multiple offers from the University of Toronto). The Faculties and Divisions include:

  • Applied Science and Engineering
  • Arts and Science, St. George campus
  • Daniels Faculty of Landscape, Architecture and Design
  • International Foundation Program
  • Kinesiology and Physical Education
  • Medical Radiation Sciences *
  • Lawrence Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing *
  • Physician Assistant *
  • University of Toronto Mississauga
  • University of Toronto Scarborough

*admission to these divisions requires some university preparation; you cannot apply to these programs directly from secondary school.

Applicants should rank their choices in order of preference.

U of T provides many opportunities to study internationally. Learn about exchange programs, field courses, international development internships, and co-op placements.

If you do not meet the published admission requirements, and have not previously attempted university level studies, you may become eligible for various programs through either the Academic Bridging Program or the Transitional Year Program. Find out more about these options  here .

If your first language is not English and you will have completed less than four years of satisfactory full-time study in a Canadian school or in a country where the dominant language is English, you may have to present proof of English facility. Find details  here .

You might be a candidate for one of our English Language Transition Programs. These are available on each of our three campuses, find out more about the  different offerings .

Once you’ve been accepted, you’ll receive information about course selection in your Next Steps package. You can get an idea of what courses are available by checking the  Course Finder , or get in touch with your  Registrar  for questions about course selection.

You should also become familiar with the  Accessible Campus Online Resource Network (ACORN) , and use it to find your courses, academic record and fee information.

  • FoI Intranet
  • Graduate Studies
  • Programs of Study
  • Admission Events and Tours
  • BI Admission
  • MMSt Admission
  • MI Admission
  • PhD Admission
  • DAIS Admission
  • International Student Experience
  • Money Matters
  • Newly Admitted Students
  • Student Services
  • Course Timetables
  • Academic Regulations
  • Student Absences
  • Dates & Deadlines
  • Enrolment & Registration
  • Part-Time Student Resources
  • Accessibility Services
  • iSkills Workshops
  • Technology Loans
  • Writing Support
  • Tuition & Fees
  • Financial Support & Aid
  • Awards & Scholarships
  • PhD Funding
  • Online Careers Resources
  • Work Permit Information
  • Master of Information (MI) Co-op Option
  • MMSt Internship
  • BI Practicums
  • MI Practicums
  • Student Life & Experience
  • News & Events
  • Continuing Education / PL Leaders Program
  • Centre for Culture and Technology
  • Digital Curation Institute
  • Identity, Privacy & Security Institute (IPSI)
  • Knowledge Media Design Institute (KMDI)
  • Technoscience Research Unit
  • Faculty Profiles
  • Postdoctoral Fellows Profiles
  • Doctoral Profiles
  • Submission Guidelines
  • Ethics FAQS
  • U of T Policies and Guidelines
  • Human Research Protocols
  • Research Awards
  • News & Events
  • Message from the FIAA President
  • FIAA Committees
  • Ways to Give
  • Alumni Award Recipients
  • FIAA Student Conference and Research Grants
  • FIAA Alumni Professional Development Grant
  • FIAA Outstanding Alumni Award & FIAA Outstanding Student Contribution Award
  • Wendy Newman Library Leadership Award
  • Arbor Award
  • Informed Magazine
  • Ask-an-Alum (AaA)
  • Open Faculty Positions
  • Teaching Instructors Profiles
  • Librarian Profiles
  • Staff Award Recipients
  • Administrative Services
  • Faculty Books
  • Message from Dean Javed Mostafa
  • EDI Complaints
  • EDI Trainings, Workshops and Events
  • EDI Student Initiatives Fund
  • EDI News and Announcements
  • EDI Fellowship Project Highlight
  • Indigenous Action and Anti-Colonialism Committee
  • Legacy of Excellence
  • Governance & Accountability
  • Informed Newsletter
  • Press Releases
  • Faculty & Students in the News
  • Colloquia, Conferences & Lectures - Recurring
  • Events Gallery
  • Hire MI Co-op Students

PhD in Information

Be equipped to take on leadership roles in information and knowledge-based environments, including academia. The doctorate program features advanced scholarly research in the theoretical basis of information studies. In private and public institutions, apply the PhD to professional practice functions such as research, systems analysis and design, and administration.

 Admission requirements to the PhD in Information program

  • Application & deadlines

Academic requirements

Supporting documents, after applying.

Quick links:

  • PhD program
  • PhD student funding
  • Collaborative specializations
  • PhD student recruitment

Contact us at [email protected]

 Application & deadlines

Entry into the program occurs once a year, in September . The program is delivered in-person on campus.

Application Form & Fee

  • Apply via the University of Toronto School of Graduate Studies Online Admissions Application.
  • Read the frequently asked questions  about the online application.
  • The application fee is $125 CAD per application.

Application Deadlines for Admission

  • October 1 – online application is available
  • December 1 – online application, application fee and all supporting documents must be submitted: statement of interest, research statement, transcripts, CV/resume, writing sample, academic letters of reference, English proficiency test scores (if applicable). An application with supporting documents submitted after this date, or with missing supporting documents will be considered incomplete, and will not be reviewed by the Admissions Committee.

Missed the PhD Info Night on October 26? Watch the recording HERE! 

Back to the top  —.

AN APPROPRIATE MASTER’S DEGREE

  • An appropriate  Master’s degree  from a recognized university is required. The degree may be in any discipline or area of study.  
  • If your degree was earned outside of Canada, use the  International Degree Equivalency Too l   to identify equivalent credentials.

MINIMUM GRADE REQUIREMENT:

  • A- average (or equivalent).
  • This is the minimum GPA requirement for consideration. Presenting the minimum does not guarantee admission.

While work experience is invaluable personal and professional experience, it cannot be a substitute for academic requirements.

TRANSCRIPTS

Transcripts from all post-secondary institutions attended:

  • For applicants currently in the process of completing their final year of study, an interim transcript must be submitted.
  • Current and past University of Toronto students applying to Faculty of Information programs may give permission to the Faculty to download an official UofT transcript by emailing  [email protected]

For the purpose of the application review, unofficial transcripts may be uploaded  to the online application form.

  • If an offer of admission is made, official final transcripts must be submitted to the Faculty as part of the offer condition(s).
  • Transcripts are considered official when they have been prepared, sealed in an envelope, and signed over the back flap by an official at the issuing institution. They are to be sent directly to the  Faculty of Information:  University of Toronto, 140 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3G6.

The Admissions Committee may at any time during the application process request that applicants submit official transcripts for all post-secondary institutions attended.

For students whose admitting degree was granted outside of North America, the Faculty of Information will accept transcripts sent directly from World Education Services (WES) as official transcripts.  The Faculty of Information will consider the evaluation report from WES but will make its own evaluation decision.

For admission to the Faculty of Information,  standardized tests (such as GMAT or GRE) are not required or requested, and will not be considered.

A CURRENT CURRICULUM VITAE (CV)/RESUME

Your CV should include: education; relevant personal and work experience, both paid and unpaid; publications; professional activities; awards, honours, grants and fellowships, as applicable.

*Please submit your research statement and statement of interest   as one document through the  SGS application site  as either a Microsoft Word file or a PDF, under the research statement field.

RESEARCH STATEMENT

All applicants should proactively reach out to  Faculty members  conducting research in the area you are interested in to ensure that your research can be well supported by a faculty member.

Your research statement should be written in essay format and be a maximum of 1,000 words, double-spaced.

A research statement generally outlines: 1) the research you plan to undertake in a PhD; 2) support at the Faculty of Information. We have provided some prompts that may stimulate and guide your thinking:

1 . The research or project you plan to undertake in your PhD : What is the research you will conduct at the Faculty of Information? What fields or areas of research is your project in conversation with (demonstrated through a short literature review)? Who are the scholars (including researchers, artists, practitioners, community leaders,  elders, etc.) that have shaped your research interests? What is significant or novel about this research? Explain how your research contributes to intellectual diversity in the Faculty.

2. Support at the Faculty of Information: Why do you want to undertake this research at the Faculty of Information? Which faculty members do you propose to supervise your research and serve on your dissertation committee, and why? Have you met with these faculty members? Which courses and programs of study (including potential optional collaborative programs) will support your research? Are there research centres, institutions, or communities that can support your research?

  • Be specific
  • Include citations and a bibliography
  • Include a short title for your research project
  • Include specific details about achievements (academic, professional, or community)
  • Write in clear, jargon-free language for an interdisciplinary committee

STATEMENT OF INTEREST

Your statement of interest should be written in essay format and be a maximum of 500 words, double-spaced. Your statement of interest generally outlines your background. We have provided some prompts that may stimulate and guide your thinking:

Your background : How did you become interested in this research? What led you to this proposed research? What background (academic, personal or professional) do you have that prepares you to pursue this project or area of research, and how do you need to grow? You should be specific about courses, essays, theses, research-creation, community organizing, activism and/or lived experiences that have prepared you to undertake the proposed research.

WRITING SAMPLE​

In the online application, you will be able to upload your writing sample to the portal at the end – during the “review” stage.

The writing sample is a piece of original academic work, around 3,000-8,000 words (double-spaced if not in published format).

It could be one of:

  • a course paper
  • an excerpt from your thesis or major research paper
  • an article submitted for publication
  • a chapter from a book or other similar publication

The writing sample is used to evaluate your writing skills, which are an important component of the PhD. This is easiest to do if the sample is single-authored. If you submit a collaboratively authored sample, please include a statement of contributions that explains your role.

ACADEMIC LETTERS OF REFERENCE

Three acadmemic letters are required . If you graduated more than five years ago, you may substitute professional letters of reference. Work-related referees should be direct supervisors who can comment on your skills that are useful in the academic environment.

In the online application, you will be asked to provide the contact information for your referees. Once you have paid the application fee your referees will be emailed by the School of Graduate Studies with instructions directing them to a secure website where they will submit electronically:

  • a candidate assessment in a fillable confidential report form
  • a reference letter

Suggested guidelines for reference letters:

  • Letters should be 1-2 pages maximum
  • Include how long you have known the applicant and in what capacity
  • Outline the applicant’s strengths as a student/researcher, ideally with specific examples
  • Avoid gendered language
  • Include details such as: how would you describe the applicant’s intellectual characteristics? Their ability to carry out independent and collaborative research? What has prepared the applicant to undertake a PhD? How do you assess the applicant’s communication, research, and writing skills? Does the applicant possess personal qualities that will help them succeed in a PhD? Is there anything else we should know about the applicant that they may not have included in their research statement?

ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY – IF REQUIRED

Applicants whose first language is not English will need to submit an English proficiency test result.

Applicants whose first language is not English but who completed an Undergraduate or Graduate degree from an institution where English is used as the medium of instruction and examination may not require an English proficiency test. However, applicants will be required to provide a letter from their previous institution to verify that English is indeed used as the medium of instruction. This letter should be sent directly to the Faculty of Information on official institution letterhead and email.

The Admissions Committee reserves the right to require applicants to provide an English proficiency test result during the application process.

back to the top —

APPLICATION STATUS CHECK

You may log in to your profile on the  application website  to confirm the receipt of your supporting documents or amend your current contact information. Your application will be marked “Under Review” when it has gone to the Admission Committee for consideration.

REVIEW PROCESS

The Admissions Committee takes a holistic approach in reviewing candidates. Emphasis is not placed on any specific area but on the overall application. Meeting the minimum requirements of the Faculty of Information and the School of Graduate Studies does not guarantee admission.

Applicants may be contacted for an interview during the application review process.

Admission is based on the availability of a faculty member to support your research. It is important to us that our admitted PhD students are well supported in their area of research by their supervisors. Therefore, you should proactively reach out to  Faculty members who are conducting research in the area you are interested in ahead of time to ensure that you will have a supervisor who has the expertise to support your research.

NOTIFICATION OF DECISIONS

back to the top 

  • Future Students
  • U of T Home
  • Urgent Support

Department of Materials Science & Engineering

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

The Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degree is the most advanced research degree in the Faculty. Working under the direction of a supervisor, PhD students engage in original research that contributes to their field of study. Advanced course work accompanies the pursuit of the thesis.

As a PhD student, you’ll receive guaranteed base support funding for up to four years of study. Current graduate scholarship funding tables can be viewed here .

Admission Requirements

Successful completion of a research master's degree in engineering, with an overall average of at least B+ (78%+), from an accredited institution. Current MASc students within our department can apply to fast-track into the PhD program before completing the MASc degree requirements

View the  full graduate studies admission requirements here .

Program Requirements & Time for Completion

The program of study normally includes 2.0 FCE (four half-courses), including the weekly Graduate Research Seminar, the Graduate Ethics Seminar, and a thesis.

In the PhD program, the departmental seminar comprises a minimum of two seminars presented to the academic staff/students of MSE.

Within 12 months of initial enrollment, all PhD students must pass a general Qualifying Examination based on the course material taken within the Department and on the background knowledge in the student's field of specialization.

The required thesis is based upon research work carried out in the Department of Materials Science & Engineering.

PhD candidates typically take between two and six years to complete the requirements of the degree. Only full-time study is available.

See all program requirements here: MSE Graduate Student Handbook

Research Areas & Affiliated Core Professors

Additive & advanced manufacturing.

  • Zou, Yu  – Extreme mechanics & Advanced Manufacturing
  • Naguib, Hani E.  (MIE/MSE) – Smart & Functional Materials
  • Hibbard, Glenn D.  – Cellular Hybrid Materials
  • Coyle, Thomas W.  – Advanced Coating Technologies
  • Thorpe, Steven J.  – Surface Engineering & Electrochemistry

Advanced Characterization & Forensics

  • Perovic, Doug D.  – Electron Microscopy,  Microelectronics & Forensics
  • Howe, Jane  – In situ  & correlative microscopy group

Biomaterials

  • Sone, Eli D.  (BME/MSE) – Composite Biological Materials
  • Hatton, Ben  – Functional & Adaptive Surfaces
  • Matsuura, Naomi   (BME/MSE) – Nanotechnology, Molecular Imaging & Systems Biology

Coatings & Surfaces

  • Nogami, Jun  – Nanostructured Growth & Characterization
  • Ruda, Harry E.  – Advanced Nanotechnology & Semiconductors
  • Lian, Keryn K.  – Flexible Energy & Electronics

Computational Material & Data Analytics

  • Singh, Chandra Veer   – Computational Materials Engineering
  • Zou, Yu   - Laboratory for Extreme Mechanics & Additive Manufacturing
  • Hattrick-SImpers, Jason  – AUTOnomous DIscovery of ALloys (AUTODIAL)
  • von Lilienfeld, Anatole  –  Professor & Clark Chair of Advanced Materials at the Vector Institute

Electronics, Photonics & Sensors

  • Kherani, Nazir P.  (ECE/MSE) – Advanced Photovoltaics & Devices
  • Ruda, Harry E.  – Advanced Nanotechnology / Semiconductors
  • Lu, Zheng-Hong  – Organic Optoelectronics

Energy Generation & Storage

  • Barati, Mansoor   – Sustainable Materials Processing
  • Azimi, Gisele   – Strategic Materials

Nano, 2D & Composite Materials

  • Singh, Chandra Veer  – Computational Materials Engineering
  • Perovic, Doug D.  – Electron Microscopy , Microelectronics & Forensics

Smart Materials & Devices

Sustainable materials processing.

  • Barati, Mansoor  – Sustainable Materials Processing

© 2024 Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering

  • Accessibility
  • Student Data Practices
  • Website Feedback

School of Graduate Studies

How to apply, 1. choose your program.

Explore our programs. Chances are, we’ve got what you’re looking for.

View / download our Graduate Student Viewbook (2023–24) for more information (PDF) .

2. Learn about Admissions Requirements

Confirm your program’s admission requirements by consulting the SGS Calendar . Visit your graduate unit’s website to confirm application procedures and deadlines. Some requirements you should consider: prerequisite degrees and courses, minimum GPA, application deadlines, and confirmation of supervision

3. Prepare Your Application

Review all the admission requirements for your chosen program. Plan enough time to submit your application and all supporting documents before the deadline. Note that referees will only receive reference requests when you pay the application fee, so give your referees plenty of time to submit their references.

4. Apply Online

Apply through GradApp .

You will create a personal profile and begin the submission. Set aside 30-60 minutes to create a personal profile on our online application system, including your personal information and academic history. Please note that you will not be able to make changes to this information after paying the application fee.

Frequently Asked Questions

Wondering how to apply from overseas? Looking for a supervisor? Search the FAQs and get the answers you need.

Financial Support

Do you have questions about your financial situation? Reach out to your Graduate Unit for more information about funding packages. For details about awards, scholarships and emergency funding, explore the opportunities .

Doctoral-stream graduate programs at the University of Toronto offer a range of financial supports to graduate students to offset the cost of their graduate education.

MD Program Home

MD/PhD Program

Our MD/PhD Program, the largest national program of its kind, trains and mentors the next generation of physician scientists.

Physician scientists are trained as medical doctors and scientists. They are in the unique position of pursuing both scientific research and clinical practice, translating academic excellence into health care excellence for Canadians every day. Our program attracts the very best medical researchers to U of T PhD programs, and has produced successive generations of innovative health leaders. Through collaborative and interdisciplinary research, we are advancing medicine and improving health around the world.

The MD/PhD Program trains physician scientists who are well prepared for both research and clinical practice, highly competitive and productive.

You may apply for admission into the MD/PhD Program at the same time as your MD application, or during your first year of medical school at U of T.

Research Training Opportunities

We have a wide array of research training opportunities available.

Research Application Support Initiative (RASI)

RASI is offered through the Community of Support and includes MD and MD/PhD student support with developing research CVs, publishing research, and finding research positions.

Black Student Application Program

The MD/PhD Program encourages applications for both the MD/PhD Program and BSAP.

Indigenous Student Application Program

Indigenous applicants are welcome to apply through both ISAP and the MD/PhD Program.

We live during a time of remarkable advances in the sciences that span the expanse of biomedical to health services research. Indeed, there has never been a time when it is so exciting to do science; never has there been such potential for discovery and application of these discoveries for the benefit of human health. Nicola Jones, MD, PhD, MD/PhD Program Director

Portrait of Hannah

MD/PhD student Hannah Kozlowski receives inaugural future leaders prize

This image shows seven members of the class of 2T6.

Class of 2T6: What Drives Your Passion for Medicine?

MD/PhD student and Toronto Rock lacrosse player Mitch De Snoo is seen in uniform during a game.

Faces of Temerty Medicine: Mitch De Snoo

  • Engineering

Institute of Biomedical Engineering (BME)

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

The PhD program in Biomedical Engineering at the University of Toronto is a research-intensive program that immerses students in the application of biomedical sciences and engineering principles to advance solutions for challenges in human health. Students can be admitted to the PhD program through direct entry after completion of a bachelor’s degree or, alternatively, after the completion of a master’s degree. PhD students receive a guaranteed minimum stipend for four years.

Criteria for success

The PhD program is designed to train students in becoming experts and leaders in research in any setting, such as (but not limited to) academic institutions, industry, non-governmental organizations, and government agencies. The core focus of a doctorate is the development and honing of five essential skills: 1) the acquisition of broad knowledge of the field and hands-on methodology; 2) the ability to create, design, and execute original, innovative and high-quality work; 3) the capacity for critical thinking and synthesis of new and complex ideas; 4) the effective communication of scientific results in all written, verbal and visual formats; and 5) adherence to the highest standards of ethics and integrity. The end-goal of the PhD training is to push the limits of current scientific knowledge, whether through solving previously unresolved questions or creating new solutions for yet-to-be-identified problems. Ideally, the research should be framed carefully within the context of the broader field, showing a deep and integrated understanding of the big picture and where the doctoral research fits. In keeping with the expectations of most PhD programs in STEM in Canada and the United States, PhD candidates in Biomedical Engineering must meet the following requirements for successful completion of the program:

  • Completion of compulsory coursework, training activities (e.g., regular supervisory meetings), and exams.
  • A written dissertation that demonstrates strong scientific motivation and substantial, cohesive aims to support a rational scientific enquiry.
  • An oral defense that demonstrates thorough knowledge of the field, methods employed, contributions to the field, and significance of the work.
  • Three first-authored original peer-reviewed research articles published in the leading journals of the field. In many instances, these three articles correspond to the three scientific aims that comprise the main chapters of a cohesive dissertation.

Length of study

Four years (defined as the period for an academically well-prepared student to complete all program requirements while registered full-time).

Admission requirements

  • Entry into PhD program after completion of a bachelor’s degree (i.e., direct entry) : A four-year bachelor’s degree in engineering, medicine, dentistry, physical sciences, or biological sciences, or its equivalent , with an average of at least 3.7 on a 4.0 grade point average scale (i.e., A minus) in the final two years of study from a recognized university ; or
  • Entry into PhD program after completion of a master’s degree : A master’s degree in engineering, medicine, dentistry, physical sciences, or biological sciences, or its equivalent , with a cumulative average of at least 3.3 on a 4.0 grade point average scale (i.e., B plus) from a recognized university .
  • Proof of English-language proficiency is required for all applicants educated outside of Canada whose native language is not English. View the BME English-language requirement policy to determine whether you are required to take a language test and for a list of accepted testing agencies and their minimum scores required for admission.
  • Applicants must find a BME faculty supervisor. ( NB : You do not need a supervisor at the time of application. However, admission is competitive and only candidates who have found and secured a research supervisor will be admitted to begin graduate studies.)
  • MD/PhD candidates must apply through the MD program
  • Possession of the minimum requirements for entry does not guarantee admission
  • GRE score is not required

Application procedures

  • Complete the online application (see requirements ) and pay the application fee
  • Arrange for your English test score to be reported electronically to the University of Toronto by the testing agency if applicable. The institution code for U of T is 0982-00 (there is no need to specify a department)
  • Contact the BME Graduate Office to identify your BME faculty supervisor

Rolling admission; multiple rounds with different enrollment capacity in each cycle

Tuition fees

Last updated: January, 2022

More information

Sarah Sarabadani, Michael Li, and Marija Cotic at Klick Health lab

What can I do with my degree? Read our alumni stories

Student pointing to a computer screen in Rodrigo's lab

Life at BME, from BME students

MRI_Machine-01-1155x678

Learn about different research labs

Talking to profs about grad school - Part 1 Smaller

Don't know how to approach a faculty? Listen to our podcasts

engaging-interactive-webinar-best-practices-and-formats

Sign up for an information webinar

professional_networking_1

Network with faculty

© 2024 Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering

  • U of T Home
  • Accessibility
  • Student Data Practices
  • Website Feedback

PhD in Architecture, Landscape, and Design

phd programs in toronto

Description

The Doctor of Philosophy in Architecture, Landscape, and Design (ALD PhD) at the Daniels Faculty is a rigorous interdisciplinary program that trains students to pursue research of the highest academic standard across a spectrum of built environmental practices.  

Through our highly adaptable curriculum—one that is unlike other PhD programs in architecture—the program enables students to pursue study independently and to share their research with the Daniels community at every stage. ALD PhD students explore methodologies across our disciplines, ranging from theoretical to applied research in design, history theory, building science, and visual studies.

We help students work across disciplines, to familiarize themselves with broad knowledge areas that will equip them to address contemporary scholarly, political, economic, and policy problems. Students may elect to advance academic scholarship while also creating new models of research-based practice that can be implemented in real world settings. We encourage graduates to transcend current disciplinary boundaries and position them to engage and lead emerging discussions outside and between specific design disciplines.  

Whether focusing on the displacement of coastal dwellers because of project sea level rises, refugee crises produced by political unrest, or cities in need as water becomes an increasingly scarce resource, the engagements of architecture, landscape architecture, and urban design students are increasingly complex and warrant creative design, critical thinking, and ethical action guided by innovative advanced research. The challenges facing constructed environments in the 21st century push us beyond existing disciplinary lines to seek synergies among our fields—building science and engineering, computation and fabrication, health and society, history and theory, technology and environment—and to develop these synergies in tandem with emergent fields like artificial intelligence, Black studies, climate justice, community-based knowledge practice, forensic architecture, gender studies, indigenous studies, sustainability, critical whiteness studies and many others.  

The Doctor of Philosophy in Architecture, Landscape, and Design goes beyond the traditional divide between applied and theoretical knowledge, bringing the two together to develop rigorous yet activist knowledge practices commensurate with present needs. The ALD PhD program is intended for students with aspirations to become active researchers and/or educators, work in government and industry, conduct research within design firms, or become community activists dedicated to meaningful social change through built environmental action. 

phd programs in toronto

University of Toronto

In addition to our core PhD faculty, affiliated faculty with expertise in design problems from multiple disciplinary perspectives are directly involved in the life of the program. These faculty members are primarily housed in schools and departments across the University of Toronto, yet they also supervise ALD PhD students. 

Students in the PhD program have opportunities to work with a wide range of institutions within and beyond the University: the Jackman Humanities Institute, the Global Cities Institute, the Munk School of Global Affairs, the School of the Environment, the Department of Geography and Planning, the School of Engineering, the Art Museum at the University of Toronto, the Canadian Centre for Architecture, the Royal Ontario Museum, the Art Gallery of Ontario, and the rich array of universities in and near Toronto. 

Requirements

Required coursework includes a colloquium and a methods course in the first year. The second year is primarily dedicated to a practicum and dissertation proposal preparation, which commences in the third year. Our funding package covers students for four years of full-time study and assists those who need additional years to find external grants to fund their program of study. 

The PhD in Architecture, Landscape & Design requirements include:

  • Coursework (6.0 FCE, including 4.0 FCE in electives and four required PhD courses: ALD4030H: Doctoral Research Colloquium; ALD4040H: Theories and Methods; ALD4050H: Research Practicum; and ALD4060H: Preparation for Thesis)
  • A two-part comprehensive exam testing breadth after 18 months and depth after 24 months
  • Successful defense of a dissertation proposal
  • Written dissertation
  • Successful doctoral final oral examination

(Note: Additional courses or examination requirements may be necessary based upon faculty advisement.)

The program includes the following minimum required courses:

  • (ALD 4030H 0.5 FCE) Doctoral Research Colloquium: Research in the fields of architecture, landscape architecture, urbanism, and design takes many forms and produces distinct areas of inquiry. This course brings together PhD students and students from the post-professional programs to encourage an intradisciplinary discussion of their unique research methods, and to support cohort building and a strong sense of community amongst students. The course will be team taught by thesis supervisors in the proposed PhD program.
  • (ALD 4040H 0.5 FCE) Theories and Methods: In this course, PhD students will explore theories and methods that have guided different disciplines in order to focus more narrowly on the unique approaches of their chosen field of study.

The program also requires participation in two doctoral research colloquia:

  • (ALD 4050H) Research Practicum: The practicum generally results in a long research paper. This requirement enables students to conduct independent research on a limited scale at the level of quality expected for a dissertation, although the resulting paper is much shorter in length. The research should be comparable to that which results in a publishable article. Based on a consultation with their advisor, the practicum may take on one of several forms, including but not limited to:   i. A self-contained paper or empirical study of publishable quality that may or may not be a component of dissertation work.   ii. The development of a theoretical model upon which the dissertation is to be based.   iii. A proposal for pilot research in the student’s dissertation area that includes a focused literature review, research design, and protocol.  
  • (ALD 4060H) Preparation for Thesis: Independent thesis research in preparation for the general exams or dissertation proposal.

Elective Requirements

The remaining required minimum 3.0 FCE (six half-credit courses) are electives to be selected from advanced (3XXX series) graduate level courses offered at the Daniels or advanced graduate courses in cognate disciplines across the University of Toronto pending the approval of the Faculty. The student’s program of study will be determined in consultation with his or her supervisory committee and approved by the committee.

The required courses listed above ground a student’s core experience in the doctoral program and provide the student cohort with a common learning experience. This pedagogical approach will expose students to methods of research and analysis that will provide intersections between the cultural-historical and the technical-professional knowledge that are not afforded in other academic disciplines with claims upon the built environment.

Electives—whether taken within the Daniels Faculty or in other University of Toronto programs—must be selected in consultation with each student’s assigned faculty advisor. Depending upon a student’s desired area of specialization, faculty advisors may require study in foreign languages, technical skills, historical periods, or research methods.

All graduate students at the University of Toronto must complete all of their course requirements at the graduate level.

ALD 4030H: Doctoral Research Colloquium Elective Elective

ALD 4040H: Theories and Methods Elective Elective

Comprehensive Examinations

ALD 4050H: Research Practicum Elective Elective

Comprehensive Examinations Elective Elective

ALD 4060H: Preparation for Thesis

Thesis Dissertation Proposal

Dissertation Proposal

Each student’s dissertation proposal should outline the main argument, rationale for supporting the prospective dissertation, a summary of existing research on the topic, a case for the originality of the research, and a schedule for research activities. The proposal will be circulated among the PhD supervisory committee for commentary and approval, and the student must present the proposal to the committee and potential additional faculty members for comment and advice. No later than the beginning of the third year of study, the student must submit to the director of the PhD program an approved proposal. An approved proposal signed by all members of the supervisory committee and the director must be submitted to the University of Toronto School of Graduate Studies PhD office.

Achieving Candidacy

Doctoral candidacy is achieved when all requirements listed above for the PhD except for the dissertation are met.

Dissertation

The student and supervisor(s) should meet regularly and must meet at least once per year. By the end of the fourth year, the student should complete a dissertation based on original research that makes a significant contribution to the field. The supervisory committee must approve the completed dissertation before it is submitted to oral examination following School of Graduate Studies standards.

Core Faculty

Claire Zimmerman , Associate Professor, Daniels Faculty Director, PhD in Architecture, Landscape, and Design

Architectural History and Theory

Christy Anderson , Professor, Renaissance and Baroque Architecture History of Art, Graduate Department of Art and the Daniels Faculty

Aleksandr Bierig , Assistant Professor, Daniels Faculty

John Harwood , Associate Professor, Daniels Faculty

Mary Lou Lobsinger , Associate Professor, Daniels Faculty

Jason Nguyen , Assistant Professor, Daniels Faculty

John Robinson , Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, School of the Environment, and the Daniels Faculty

Peter Sealy , Assistant Professor, Daniels Faculty

Landscape History and Theory

Georges Farhat , Associate Professor, Daniels Faculty

Mark Laird , Associate Professor, Daniels Faculty

Urbanism / Urban Design

Patricia L. McCarney , Associate Professor, Director, Global Cities Institute Department of Political Science, the Daniels Faculty, and the Global Cities Institute

Building Science/Computation

Alstan Jakubiec , Assistant Professor, Daniels Faculty

Ted Kesik , Professor of Building Science, Daniels Faculty

Bomani Khemet , Assistant Professor, Daniels Faculty

Brady Peters , Assistant Professor, Daniels Faculty

Maria Yablonina , Assistant Professor, Daniels Faculty

Architecture, Health and Society

Stephen Verderber , Professor, Daniels Faculty and the Dalla Lana School of Public Health

Visual Studies

Mitchell Akiyama , Assistant Professor, Daniels Faculty

Zach Blas , Assistant Professor, Daniels Faculty

Affiliated Faculty

Joseph Clarke , Assistant Professor, Modern Architecture History of Art, Graduate Department of Art

Jennifer Drake , Assistant Professor, Department of Civil & Mineral Engineering

Paul Hess , Associate Professor, Department of Geography and Planning

Heba Mostafa , Assistant Professor, Islamic Art and Architecture History of Art, Graduate Department of Art

Matti Siemiatycki , Associate Professor, Department of Geography and Planning

Simon Stern , Associate Professor & Co-Director, Centre for Innovation Law & Policy, Faculty of Law

Marianne Touchie , Assistant Professor, Departments of Civil & Mineral Engineering and Mechanical & Industrial Engineering

Chen-Pang Yeang , Associate Professor and Director, Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology

phd programs in toronto

As a leading research institution, the University of Toronto depends largely on our success in recruiting outstanding graduate students and enabling them to realize their potential. This means providing financial resources so that students can focus on their studies and complete their degrees in a timely manner.

Towards this aim, the Daniels Faculty provides PhD students with a base funding commitment of $19,500 plus tuition and fees. This funding commitment is valid for a maximum of four years.

Students receive their funding commitment in annual funding packages. These packages may be composed of a variety of funding sources, including:

  • The University of Toronto Fellowship (UTF)
  • Research Stipends and Research Assistantships
  • Teaching Assistantships, in accordance with CUPE Collective Agreement
  • Internal Awards and Grants
  • Canada Graduate Scholarships (CGS-D - NSERC or SSHRC) - open to domestic students. Applicants wishing to enter the PhD program and who are registered (or on approved leave of absence) at the University of Toronto at any time between Jan 1 and Dec 31, 2020 must apply through the Daniels Faculty; contact [email protected] for application process and deadline. All other applicants , apply directly to either NSERC or SSHRC , depending on research subject.
  • Ontario Graduate Scholarships (OGS)  - open to domestic and international students. Applicants wishing to enter the PhD program must apply through the Daniels Faculty.
  • Vanier-Canada Graduate Scholarships (Vanier-CGS) - open to domestic and international students. Applicants wishing to enter the PhD program must apply through the Daniels Faculty; contact [email protected] for application process and deadline.

International students receive support at a higher level in recognition of the costs associated with the differential in fees (e.g., UHIP). On an annual basis, students will receive a funding letter outlining the composition, timing, and disbursement of their funding package.

Current Students

  • Kanwal Aftab
  • Ahmad Shoaib Amiri
  • Yeo-Jin Katerina Bong
  • Zheming (Taro) Cai
  • Katie Filek
  • Nazanin GanjehZadeh  
  • Qingyun Lin
  • Fion Ouyang
  • Anna Renken
  • Brian Slocum
  • Kachun Alex Wong

Logo

Universal Navigation

Universal navigation2.

  • PhD Program
  • PhD Program Placement
  • Collaborative Specializations

Search form

phd programs in toronto

The Department of English at the University of Toronto offers two doctoral streams, the PhD program and the PhD U (“direct-entry”) program.

Admission to the doctoral streams is highly selective.

PDF icon

The PhD program welcomes applications from our own English MA students and English MA students from other recognized institutions.

Candidates for admission to the PhD program must complete an MA in English at this or another university with a standing of A- or better and must satisfy the Department that they are capable of independent research at an advanced level.

The PhD program is designed for completion in five years ; it may extend, if necessary, to a maximum of six years.

PhD U (Direct-Entry) Program

The "direct-entry" PhD U program welcomes applications from exceptional students who have completed their undergraduate English BA degree but not an English MA, or who have completed an MA in a program related to but not in the field of English. (If you have any questions about your eligibility, please contact the Associate Director, PhD , before applying.)

Please see the Application Information  page (under “Programs”) for further information about eligibility for the PhD U program, which involves an additional year of coursework and therefore tends to take an additional year to complete.

Upon registration, all doctoral candidates are assigned a mentor from the Department’s graduate faculty.

A thesis supervisor and supervisory committee are appointed at the end of Year 1 for students in the PhD program or the end of Year 2 for students in the PhD U program.

The Special Fields Examination is normally taken in March, April, or May of Year 2 in the program for PhD students or Year 3 in the program for PhD U students.

Program Requirements and Course Work

At the University of Toronto, the acronym FCE stands for “Full Course Equivalent.” A “full course” is weighted 1.0 FCE and meets for the full year (i.e., two terms or semesters). Almost all of our graduate courses in English , however, run for a single term and are thus called “half courses,” which are weighted 0.5 FCE. (“3.0 FCEs,” in other words, in practice means 6 single-term courses.)

The program requirements (except for ENG9900H) for the PhD are usually completed within the first two years of the program.

The minimum course requirements for the degree are as follows:

  • ENG9400H Essential Skills Workshop Series (0.25 FCE); taken in Year 1 of the program
  • ENG9900H Teaching Literature (0.5 FCE); students have the option of taking this required course in either Fall of Year 2 or Fall of Year 3
  • 3.0 additional FCEs in English, as approved by the department; the department strongly encourages students to complete these 3.0 additional FCEs in Year 1
  • Every student must complete at least 2.0 FCEs outside the chosen field of study over the course of their graduate training. The student is encouraged to combine these courses into a minor field. Graduate courses taken as part of the master's program may be counted in this connection, but the following courses may not be counted: ENG6999Y Critical Topographies: Theory and Practice of Contemporary Literary Studies in English , ENG9400H Essential Skills Workshop Series , ENG9900H Teaching Literature .

Language Requirement: PhD students must also demonstrate reading knowledge of French by May 31 of Year 3 of registration. With the permission of the department, another language (including Old English) may be substituted for French provided that this other language is required by the student's research area. The supervisory committee may require the student to qualify in other program-related languages as well.

In order to maintain good academic standing, and to continue in the PhD program, the student must complete each course with a grade of at least B and maintain an average grade of at least A–.

PhD students may take up to 1.0 FCE of coursework outside of the Graduate Program in English, with the approval of the Associate Director, PhD.  

Cross-listed courses (that is, courses taught by English graduate faculty in other units) and courses required for a collaborative specialization are equivalent to English courses and may be taken without special permission from the Department.

PhD U (Direct-Entry)

The program requirements (except for ENG9900H) for the PhD U are usually completed within the first three years of the program.

  • ENG6999Y Critical Topographies: Theory and Practice of Contemporary Literary Studies in English (1.0 FCE); taken in Year 1 of the program
  • ENG9400H Essential Skills Workshop Series (0.25 FCE); taken in Year 2
  • ENG9900H Teaching Literature (0.5 FCE); students have the option of taking this required course in either Fall of Year 3 or Fall of Year 4
  • 5.0 additional FCEs in English, as approved by the department. In Year 1, in addition to ENG6999Y the student must complete 2.0 FCEs. In addition to ENG9400H, students must then complete the remaining 3.0 FCEs by the end of Year 3. The department strongly encourages students to complete these 3.0 additional FCEs in Year 2.
  • Every student must complete at least 2.0 FCEs outside the chosen field of study. The student is encouraged to combine these courses into a minor field. Neither ENG6999Y Critical Topographies: Theory and Practice of Contemporary Literary Studies in English , ENG9400H Essential Skills Workshop Series , nor ENG9900H Teaching Literature  may be counted towards a minor field.

Language Requirement: PhD U students must also demonstrate reading knowledge of French by May 31 of Year 4 of registration. With the permission of the department, another language (including Old English) may be substituted for French provided that this other language is required by the student's research area. The supervisory committee may require the student to qualify in other program-related languages as well.

In order to maintain good academic standing, and to continue in the PhD U program, the student must complete each course with a grade of at least B and maintain an average grade of at least A–.

PhD U students may take up to 1.0 FCE of coursework outside of the Graduate Program in English, with the approval of the Associate Director, PhD.  

Thesis and Supervisory Committee Information

Along with the information provided under the headings below, please carefully consult these two important documents:

The Thesis Topic

Careful consideration in the process of choosing a thesis topic is critical for all doctoral candidates. Select a subject that excites your curiosity, engages your interest, and represents your current thinking and expertise. A thesis topic should emerge from coursework and intellectual growth during the first stages of the program.

Even candidates who enter the program with ideas about a thesis topic are advised to test them further against their own development, the current state of scholarship in the field, and available faculty and archival resources

Finding a Supervisor

The Graduate English faculty is extensive and extraordinarily wide-ranging. Students are advised to consider all potential supervisors from among faculty holding the rank of Associate or Full Professor.

Every PhD student is assigned a mentor, who is one source for information about potential thesis supervisors. Above all, coursework offers the chance to explore intellectual affinities with potential supervisors, and the Director and Associate Directors of the graduate program can offer useful advice.

Members of the Graduate Faculty are always willing to discuss thesis topics and supervision with candidates, and asking a faculty member to read and comment on a fellowship proposal is an excellent way to begin to gauge the potential of a supervisory relationship.

Students should initiate discussion of a thesis topic with potential supervisors early in the second term of the first year of the PhD program (or second year for direct-entry students).

Form A: Preliminary Thesis Proposal and Supervisory Committee Request List

File

After securing a thesis supervisor and developing a thesis topic in consultation with that supervisor, the student and supervisor work together to submit Form A to the Department by May 15 of the first year (or second year for PhD U students) .

As part of the process of completing Form A, the student should consult with four (or, at a minimum, three) additional members of the graduate faculty to gain further perspectives on the design and viability of the project. On the form, the student lists the names of the faculty members consulted and the names of up to four faculty members to be considered as potential members of the supervisory committee. (The names of the faculty consulted and the potential committee members are often, but may not necessarily be, the same.)

The Preliminary Thesis Proposal is a statement of approximately 1-2 single-spaced pages outlining the focus and approach of the proposed program of research. Successful proposals will be written in clear, concise prose. As its title suggests, the proposal is preliminary: the position paper component of the Special Fields Exam (at the end of the following year) will provide the opportunity for revision and expansion. Students should feel free, if it in fact reflects their current thinking, to adapt their Program of Study from a SSHRC or Plan of Study from a OGS proposal. As above, be sure that your Thesis Proposal reflects your current thinking, growth, and knowledge of the field.

Form B: Supervisory Committee and Special Fields Reading List

After Form A has been received, the Director and Associate Director, PhD, will determine the composition of the supervisory committee (usually the supervisor plus two additional members). Early in the summer, the candidate should then meet with the supervisory committee as a group to discuss the proposal, draw up an initial list of texts for the Special Fields Examination (see below), and develop a plan of work.

In late summer or early fall the student consults with the committee once again to complete Form B, which must be submitted to the Department by October 1 of the second year of the program (or third year for PhD U students) .

Please see below  for further information about the Special Fields Examination.

Thesis Supervision

It is critical to the success of the working relationship between supervisor and candidate to develop an initial agreement about the method and scope of the research, and to clarify the expectations of supervisor and candidate: about the kind and amount of advice that the candidate wants and the supervisor is able and willing to offer; about the involvement of the members of the supervisory committee; about the frequency, regularity and contents of consultations; about an appropriate time scheme for the completion of the thesis; and about the way draft work is to be submitted.

The candidate meets with the supervisor and individual committee members according to the schedule they have established, but the candidate must meet with the full supervisory committee at least once every year in order to meet SGS registration requirements.

Please carefully consult the following SGS publications:

  • Supervision Guidelines
  • Graduate Supervision Guidelines — Faculty Edition
  • Graduate Supervision Guidelines — Student Edition
  • The School of Graduate Studies (SGS) Centre for Graduate Mentorship and Supervision

Thesis Submission Guidelines and the Final Oral Examination

Special fields examination.

The Special Fields Examination both prepares students for teaching and scholarly work in a particular field and facilitates the transition to writing the doctoral thesis.

Accordingly, the Special Fields Reading List, which forms the basis for the examination, comprises between 80 and 100 texts, roughly two-thirds (55-65) in a major field and roughly one-third (25-35) in a minor field. Students construct their own lists in consultation with their supervisor and thesis committee.

The Special Fields Examination must be completed by the end of Year 2 (or Year 3 for direct-entry students) and will normally be taken in March, April, or May of that year.

  • General Information
  • Current Students
  • MA Programs
  • Request new password
  • U of T Home
  • Arts & Science Home

In This Section

  • 100-Level Courses
  • 200-Level Courses
  • 300-Level Courses
  • 400-Level Courses
  • Individual Studies Courses
  • 2024 Summer Courses
  • Philosophy Essay Clinic
  • Program Requirements
  • PHL1 Mentorship Program for 1st Year Students
  • Socrates Project: Undergraduate TAs
  • Philosophy Resources for Undergraduates
  • Philosophy Course Union (PCU)
  • Noēsis: the Undergraduate Journal of Philosophy
  • Master of Arts (MA) Programs
  • Course Requirements
  • Breadth Requirements
  • Revision Paper Requirement
  • Logic Requirement
  • Research Tool Requirement
  • Qualifying Requirement
  • Thesis Prospectus Requirement
  • ABD Status Requirement
  • Thesis Requirements
  • Residency Requirement
  • 4-Year PhD Timeline
  • Thesis Requirement
  • 5-Year PhD Timeline
  • Courses (2023-2024)
  • Safety Abroad Requirements
  • Roles and Responsibilities
  • PhD Defence Scheduling & Convocating
  • PhD Residency Requirement
  • Leaves of Absence 
  • Honours and Awards
  • Graduate Program Forms
  • PhD Placement Record: 1970-1979
  • PhD Placement Record: 1980-1989
  • PhD Placement Record: 1990-1999
  • PhD Placement Record: 2000-2009
  • PhD Placement Record: 2010-2019
  • PhD Placement Record: 2020-present
  • Graduate Philosophy Students’ Union (GPSU)
  • Climate, Diversity, and Inclusiveness

Graduate Studies

The Department of Philosophy at the University of Toronto is the top-ranked philosophy program in Canada, and one of the leading philosophy departments in the world.

With over 50 graduate faculty active in both teaching and research, we are able to offer supervision in all major areas of philosophy, as well as a broad range of graduate courses every year. Graduate students are a vital part of our research community, not only attending courses but also organizing reading groups and workshops, and participating in our very active calendar of lectures and conferences.

Four graduate students in front of the Roman Forum

Grad students Michaela Manson, Robert Mason, Robbie Matyasi, and Matthew Wurst (L to R) at the Roman Forum while in Italy for a 2018 masterclass on “Scholastic and Humanistic Roots of Early Modern Philosophy.”

In recent years, our students have published papers in journals such as  The Journal of Philosophy, Philosophical Studies, Philosophical Quarterly, Analysis, British Journal for the History of Philosophy , and  Philosophy of Science.  Graduate students receive special funding for travel, to present their research at conferences such as the American and Canadian Philosophical Association Meetings, the Joint Session meetings in the United Kingdom, and specialized workshops and conferences in a great variety of areas of philosophy.

Located in the heart of the cosmopolitan city of Toronto, the Philosophy Department is housed in a newly renovated Art Deco Building (the Jackman Humanities Institute ), with lounge and study space for students.  Every graduate student we admit is guaranteed financial support for the prescribed duration of the program. This support fully covers tuition, fees and health insurance, and also includes funds for living expenses. See our graduate recruitment poster or watch three of our current graduate students , Jack Beaulieu , Alexandra Gustafson , and Zain Raza , talk about their experiences .

Dalla Lana School of Public Health

  • PhD: Epidemiology
  • Our Programs
  • Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Degree Overview

This program aims to develop excellent epidemiologists, able to work, teach and conduct research on contributors to health; disease, disability and death; and effective measures of prevention.

The overall goal of the program is to enable graduates to acquire the necessary scientific knowledge and methodological skills to become independent researchers in epidemiology.  Graduates with a PhD in epidemiology are expected to have developed the skills which enable them to:

  • evaluate the scientific literature with respect to epidemiologic concepts, theoretical hypotheses, designs, methods, analyses and interpretation;
  • develop theoretical formulations and testable hypotheses from concepts in the literature or epidemiological observations, and propose research questions and design and write research proposals;
  • understand the practical and scientific implications of epidemiological research designs and the associated methodological and analytical techniques;
  • identify and evaluate available data for addressing specific research questions;
  • evaluate strengths and weaknesses of data collection methods, develop methods appropriate for answering specific research questions, and assess the measurement properties of data collection tools;
  • address ethical issues related to epidemiologic studies;
  • appreciate the policy implications of epidemiologic research; and,
  • write and defend a doctoral dissertation which makes a contribution to the scientific literature.

Click here to view PhD Competencies

Admission Requirements

  • Applicants generally are expected to hold a master’s degree in epidemiology or a master’s degree in a related field with strong course work in epidemiology and biostatistics.
  • Applicants are expected to have prior research experience which may be demonstrated through the completion of a master’s thesis, supervised research practicum, or other research experience, and which includes independent contributions to scientific publications.
  • Applicants should have practical experience and reasonable expertise using standard statistical software packages.
  • Click here for information regarding the application process.

Successful applicants will have research interests congruent with those of one or more members of faculty, and may have identified a possible primary or co-supervisor, prior to admission.  Admission may otherwise be conditional upon identifying a supervisor.  Thus, applicants are strongly encouraged to seek out potential supervisors, and discuss with them the possibilities, prior to applying to the degree program.  Applicants should note that identifying a potential supervisor does not guarantee admission.

Course Requirements

Course Requirements (4.0 FCE)

Required Courses (3.5)

Elective Courses (0.5)

Students are best served if their elective courses form part of a coherent package of experience. In this light, students are encouraged to choose elective courses that relate to the theme of their dissertation. For example, advanced methodological courses might be appropriate for a dissertation which involves highly complex statistical analysis; pathology courses for a dissertation which focuses more on disease process; bioethics courses for a dissertation on genetic epidemiology. Electives also may fill gaps in overall training and experience: A student with a largely social sciences background might benefit from health professional level pathology courses; a student with substantial bench-sciences training, who is interested in disease screening, might consider courses in behavioural sciences, health economics, or health policy. Students are encouraged to discuss the selection of appropriate electives with their Supervisory Committees.

Emphasis in Artificial intelligence and Data Science

Students in the PhD program in the Epidemiology field of study have the option to complete an emphasis by completing appropriate coursework in a given area. The emphasis requirements will also count toward, but may exceed, the 4.0 full-course equivalent (FCE) field requirement.

Course Requirements: Emphasis in Artificial Intelligence and Data Science (1.5 FCE)

Qualifying Examination

The qualifying examination is made up of 2 components. Both of the components of the qualifying examination should be completed by the end of the first year.

Details of each component are below:

  • Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (TCPS 2) online tutorial: CORE (Course on Research Ethics) is an introduction to the 2nd edition of the Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (TCPS 2). It consists of eight modules focusing on the guidance in TCPS 2 that is applicable to all research regardless of discipline or methodology. The completion of this module is usually done within the Introduction to Public Health Research (CHL5005H) course. A certificate of completion must be emailed to Matilda Kong at kong@utoronto.ca ( http://www.pre.ethics.gc.ca/eng/education/tutorial-didacticiel/ )
  • Doctoral Qualifying Examination: Written doctoral qualifying examination*, which includes an in-class written exam and a take-home question. This exam is held June of the first academic year. This part of the examination is designed to test competence in the concepts, principles, data sources, and content of epidemiology, and the ability to apply these concepts and principles critically. The examination may include multiple choice, fill-in-the blanks, calculations, and short answer questions. The take-home question will be an essay-style. An Examination Committee will mark the examination, blind to the identity of the student. A passing grade is 70%. Students who achieve higher percentages will be informed that they have received grades of Honours (90%+) or High Pass (80-89%).

*The written qualifying can be fulfilled after the indicated required courses are complete:

CHL5005H: Professional Skills for Doctoral Students in Public Health (0.5) CHL5404H: Research Methods I (0.5) CHL5406H: Quantitative Methods for Biomedical Research (0.5) CHL5408H: Research Methods II (0.5) CHL5424H: Advanced Quantitative Methods in Epidemiology (0.5)

PhD Proposal Defense

The PhD proposal defense is a requirement for candidacy and should be completed by December of the second year.  The proposal defense can be done during the first year of study  with the approval of the Program Director. The purpose of the proposal defense is to:

  • Ensure that proposed research will result in a successful PhD dissertation.
  • Strengthen the thesis question, design, and methods through critical feedback.
  • Assess the students’ ability to conduct independent and original research.
  • Assess sufficient content/substantive knowledge base relevant to their thesis topic.
  • Provide a formal approval to proceed with the dissertation research.

Format: The proposal will include a brief and cogent review of the literature, justification of the research question, the objectives and hypotheses, design, data collection or data sources, proposed analysis strategies, timetable, ethics, and potential problems or issues. The proposal will conclude with references in proper bibliographic format. The proposal also will include a concise statement of the student’s role in the development and conduct of the research. A title page, with word count, will include the names of the Supervisor and other Supervisory Committee members. The proposal will be printed using a 12-point font, and limited to 10 single-spaced pages. The bibliography and title page are not included in the page or word counts. Appendices should be kept to a minimum.

Defense for approval of PhD proposal:

The proposal defense consists of a written outline of the dissertation proposal and an oral presentation. The completion of this process also counts as the protocol approval, which is required for candidacy. The following elements will be assessed:

  • The literature review is comprehensive and specific to the content area;
  • The proposed work demonstrates scholarly impact and innovation with respect to methods and/or substantive contribution;
  • Clarity of research question/objectives
  • Completeness and relevance to study design/research plan
  • Rationale for approach and methodology
  • Appropriateness of research design
  • Appropriateness of research methods and statistical analyses
  • Feasibility of research approach including power calculation as appropriate
  • Requirement, timeline, preliminary data etc.
  • Anticipation of difficulties/limitations and plans for management
  • Ethical considerations
  • The project is adequate and appropriate for a PhD dissertation and manageable within the time-frame and expectations of the PhD program.

The proposal presentation must be attended by the student, the Supervisory Committee and one external reviewer approved by the Program Director. The presentation will be advertised within the Graduate Department of Public Health Sciences, and students and faculty are encouraged to attend.  The external reviewer must be a Full or Associate member of SGS, ideally has research supervisory experience at the doctoral level, and must have specific research expertise in the dissertation topic or methods. The reviewer should have had no previous involvement with the development of the proposal under review.

Process for evaluation:

  • The student’s Supervisory Committee approves the written proposal at least three weeks before the anticipated date of proposal defense.
  • The student contacts the Program Director, with a copy to the Administrative Assistant, to give notice that the proposal is ready for defense, together with the name, email and brief rationale for the external reviewer. As a reminder, the reviewer must have an SGS appointment at the University of Toronto. The Program Director will approve the external reviewer via email.
  • The Supervisor contacts reviewer and committee to arrange the date/time of the presentation, and informs the program Administrative Assistant of the arrangements.
  • The Administrative Assistant reserves a room and any required audiovisual equipment specified by the student, and posts notices on bulletin boards and e-mail, including a confirmatory e-mail to the reviewers and Supervisory Committee.
  • The student distributes the proposal to the external reviewer, Supervisory Committee members, and Administrative Assistant, three weeks before the date of the proposal defense.
  • The proposal defense will begin with a 20-minute presentation of the research proposal by the student, followed by a period of questions and discussion. Presentation questions are posed to the student in two rounds, with approximately 10 minutes allotted to each reviewer per round, with the reviewer taking the lead in the questions. The Supervisor will chair the proceedings and act as timekeeper. The question period will typically be expected to last 60 to 80 minutes. The Supervisor will take notes of all issues raised.
  • At the end of formal questioning, the student and other attendees not part of the review panel will leave the room, and the reviewer and Supervisory Committee will have a general discussion of four elements (I – IV) outlined above. The reviewers will rate the performance of the student using a standardized form and an Accept/Provisional Acceptance/Not Accepted decision will be reached. The Supervisor and external reviewer will take note of the feedback and prepare a summary of the recommendations to share with the student.  Typically, the Supervisor will take notes, on the form during the defense, and email to the external reviewer for final review before sending to the student.

The following outline the implications for the evaluation:

Approval: The student may proceed with dissertation work and remaining program progression, taking note of all feedback received during the protocol defense and in consultation with the Supervisor considering minor amendments to their doctoral research accordingly. This candidacy requirement has been met.

Provisional Approval: The student must create a point-by-point response to the concerns/issues raised and make changes to the proposal within 60 days of the proposal defense. Once the Supervisory committee has approved the revisions, the proposal must be submitted to the Program Director and Administrative Assistant as a final record. An approval will then be recorded for candidacy.

Not approved: Non-approval indicates that the performance was inadequate and/or the protocol has major deficiencies according to the IV domains. In the event that the student is not approved on the first attempt, the student will be permitted one more attempt. Failure of the second attempt will result in a recommendation for program termination.

  • At the conclusion of the discussion, the student will be invited into the room to learn the general outline of the committee’s decision. The decision and the completed form must be conveyed to the Program Director and Administrative Assistant within 1 week of the defense.

Supervision

Click here to view the SGS Supervision Guidelines for Students.

Beginning prior to admission, and with the assistance of the Program Director, the applicant will explore supervisory possibilities: a faculty member with an appointment in the Division of Epidemiology who has a Full appointment in the School of Graduate Studies (SGS), and who conducts epidemiological research. In some instances, the student and the Program Director will identify both a primary and a co-supervisor. The co-supervisor generally will be a faculty member with an Associate appointment in the SGS. The faculty supervisor may be confirmed prior to beginning the program, and generally will be in place by the end of the first year.  students are encouraged to explore broadly and have wide-ranging discussions with potential supervisors.  The Program Director must approve the selection of the primary supervisor and the co-supervisor.

Role and Responsibilities

The Supervisor is responsible for providing mentorship to the student through all phases of the PhD program. Thus; to the extent possible, the Supervisor will guide the selection of courses, dissertation topic, supervisory committee membership, and supervisory committee meetings; will assist with applications for funding; will make every effort to provide funding to the student directly; and will provide references for the student on a timely basis. The Supervisor also will comment on the student’s plan for preparation for the comprehensive examination. The Supervisor will guide the development of the student’s research proposal, and the implementation and conduct of all aspects of the research; advise on writing the dissertation; correct drafts and approve the final dissertation; and attend the defense.

Supervisory Committee

With the assistance of the Supervisor, and with the approval of the Program Director, the student will assemble a Supervisory Committee within the first year of study.

The Supervisory Committee, chaired by the Supervisor, will contribute advice regarding course selection; preparation for the comprehensive examination; selection of the dissertation topic; preparation and defense of the proposal; and implementation of the research plan. The Supervisory Committee also will provide timely and constructive criticism and guidance regarding data analysis, writing the dissertation, and preparing for its defense.

Composition

The Supervisory Committee generally will comprise the Supervisor and at least two members who hold either Full or Associate appointments in the SGS and may or may not hold a primary appointment in Epidemiology. Between these individuals and the Supervisor, there should be expertise in all content and methodological areas relevant to the student’s research focus and dissertation proposal. At times, when the student’s Supervisory Committee extends beyond the requisite Supervisor plus two SGS-qualified members, additional members may not necessarily hold SGS appointments (e.g., community members).  Non-SGS members, however, may participate only as non-voting qualified observers at the SGS Final Oral Examination (i.e., observer who has been approved by the student, the Supervisor, and the SGS Vice-Dean, Programs).

Supervisory Committee meetings will be held at least every six (6) months throughout the student’s PhD program. Under certain circumstances (e.g., during times of very rapid progress), the student and the Supervisory Committee may decide there is a need for more frequent meetings.

At the end of every meeting of the Supervisory Committee, the student and the Committee will complete the Supervisory Committee Meeting Report . All present must sign the report, which will be delivered to the Program Director and filed in the student’s progress file in the Graduate Department of Public Health Sciences.

The Report of the Graduate Department of Public Health Sciences Oral Defense Committee Meeting will be completed at the end of the Departmental Defense during which the Oral Defense Committee makes the recommendation for the student to proceed to the SGS Final Oral Examination (FOE).  The Report will also be signed and delivered to the Program Director and filed in the student’s progress file in the Graduate Department of Public Health Sciences.

Progress Through the PhD

The phases of the PhD program are identified by a set of accomplishments which the student generally will attain in order, and within a satisfactory time. These phases, which will be monitored by the Program Director of the PhD program, are the identification of the Supervisor and the Supervisory Committee, completion of required and elective course work, completion of the comprehensive examination, defense of the research proposal, and defense of the dissertation (both Departmental and SGS ). Full-time students are expected to complete the PhD within four (4) years. Flex-time students may take longer, but not more than eight (8) years; they must submit a revised list of milestones, for approval by the Supervisor and the Program Director.  Click here to view the PhD Epidemiology Timeline .

Research Ethics Board Approval

All research projects in which University of Toronto students are involved at any stage must have approval from the University of Toronto Research Ethics Board (REB). This includes ongoing research projects of the Supervisor which has previously received REB approval and where REB approval is already held from a University affiliated hospital or research institute. Preliminary work necessary to prepare the proposal may also require an original REB application or amendment to the original study. 
See details of the REB application and review process at Office of Research Ethics ( www.research.utoronto.ca/for-researchers-administrators/ethics/ ).

The dissertation proposal, as approved by the Program Director, must have University of Toronto Research Ethics Board approval as a supervised research study. An application for initial REB approval (or amendment to approval for an ongoing study), will therefore follow the approval of the dissertation proposal.

Dissertation

A dissertation in epidemiology must have relevance to the health of human populations. Within that broad framework, the dissertation may deal with any topic in the areas of medicine, public health and, health care services; and the research designs and statistical methods used in these fields. A doctoral dissertation in epidemiology may involve new data, collected for the purpose of the study, or the use of data previously collected. In the latter case, the analysis must be suitably complex, and must be driven by theoretical considerations and a specific research or methodological question. The dissertation result should be new knowledge and should include findings suitable for publication in peer-reviewed epidemiology journals. It may include both methodological and substantive advances in knowledge.

The dissertation topic must include clearly posed research questions amenable to study by appropriate epidemiologic methods. The student must have contributed substantially to the identification of the research question and must have played an integral part in the planning of the investigation. Wherever appropriate, the student will also be expected to participate directly in the collection of the data. Students will be expected to analyze their own data using appropriate analytic approaches.

Format Options for Dissertation

Students may choose one of two options for preparation of the dissertation: a monograph or a series of journal articles. The monograph is the default option. It is a single report, divided into chapters: introduction, literature review, methods, results, and discussion. A reference list would be followed by various appended material, which might include data collection instruments, additional related findings, and the like.

The journal article option varies from the monograph in that the main body of the dissertation comprises approximately three (3) complete, stand-alone manuscripts; these may already have been published, or may be ready to submit for peer-review. The manuscripts should be preceded and followed by material that unites them. So, for instance, an introduction and literature review, and possibly methods, more global in scope than those included in the manuscripts themselves, would precede the manuscripts; likewise, a discussion would follow, and would tie the manuscripts together, describing how they – as a group – make a contribution to the literature. Appended material might include the methodological details that would not be present in the methods sections of the manuscripts.

Regardless of format, the student should identify and follow appropriate style guides for the preparation of the dissertation.

Dissertation Defense

The student should aim to defend the dissertation within four years of entry into the PhD program. The defense of the dissertation will take place in two stages: first, a Departmental defense, second, a formal defense (the Final Oral Examination) before a University committee according to procedures established by the School of Graduate Studies (SGS). The two defenses generally are separated by about eight weeks.

Departmental Defense

The Departmental defense will be held after the completed dissertation has been approved by all members of the student’s Supervisory Committee, and the completion of the final Supervisory Committee meeting report. The purpose of this defense is to rehearse the oral presentation for the SGS defense and to determine whether the student is ready for the SGS defense.

The student should expect constructive criticism about the clarity and length of the presentation and the quality of visual materials, as well as about the dissertation itself. In particular, the Departmental defense will confirm that:

  • The student has adequately met the requirements for a dissertation; and,
  • The student has the required level of understanding of the scientific issues involved in the dissertation work.

The Departmental defense is attended by the student, the Supervisor and other members of the Supervisory Committee, and two reviewers with full SGS appointments. At least one reviewer should have supervisory experience in epidemiology at the doctoral level. The second reviewer may be a substantive expert from another discipline. Eligible reviewers will have had no prior involvement with the design or conduct of the research, with the exception of providing references or other background material, and generally will not be the faculty who served as reviewers at the proposal defense. The presentation will be advertised within the Graduate Department of Public Health Sciences, and other students and faculty are encouraged to attend.

  • The Supervisory Committee approves the dissertation, at least four (4) weeks before the anticipated date of the defense.
  • The Supervisory Committee identifies at least two potential reviewers.
  • The student contacts the Program Director (copy to the Administrative Assistant) to give notice that the dissertation is ready for defense, together with the names and email addresses of potential reviewers. If necessary, the Program Director suggests alternative reviewers. The Program Director approves the reviewers, and will nominate one of them to be the Program Director’s representative.
  • The Supervisor contacts reviewers and arranges the date/time of the defense, and informs the Administrative Assistant of the arrangements.
  • The Administrative Assistant reserves a room and any required audiovisual equipment, as specified by the student, and posts notices on bulletin boards and e-mail, including a confirmatory e-mail to the Supervisory Committee and reviewers.
  • The student distributes a copy of the dissertation to reviewers and to Supervisory Committee members four (4) weeks before the date of the defense, with an extra copy to the Supervisor (or designate) which may be made available to other faculty or students who may wish to read it.
  • The Oral Defense Committee comprises the external reviewers, the Supervisor and the other Supervisory Committee members.
  • Before the Oral Defense Committee convenes, the student and non-committee attendees may be asked to leave the room to permit discussion of the defense process among the Oral Defense Committee members.
  • The defense will begin with a 20-minute presentation by the student of the research findings, followed by a period of questions and discussion among those present, with the two reviewers taking the lead in the questions. The Supervisor will chair the proceedings and act as timekeeper. The question period will typically be expected to last 60 to 80 minutes. The Supervisor will take notes of all issues raised.
  • At the end of formal questioning, the student and other attendees will generally be asked to leave the room, and the Oral Defense Committee will discuss any issues of concern, to provide focused, constructive, and detailed feedback to the student, Supervisor, and other members of the Supervisory Committee on the dissertation and its oral defense. The Program Director’s Representative will take note of the feedback with respect to whether the dissertation work is generally adequate for the Final Oral Examination (FOE); changes that should be made to the dissertation prior to arranging for the FOE, and improvements that could be made to the oral presentation and defense; and will prepare a summary of the recommendations. If revisions to the text of the dissertation are recommended, there will also be discussion of the timing of the FOE. The student may be invited to be present at these discussions at the discretion of the Oral Defense Committee.
  • At the end of the Departmental Defense, the Oral Defense Committee  will complete the Report of the Graduate Department of Public Health Sciences Oral Defense Committee Meeting. The options for proceedings are:

a) Dissertation is acceptable: ____    as is ____    with corrections/modifications as described in report to be prepared by the Program Director’s Representative

b) Another Supervisory Committee meeting required to see final dissertation: ____ Yes ____ No

c) If no, Committee member to see that changes are made: __________________________

d) Dissertation recommended for examination in: ______ months.

The Report will be delivered to the Program Director and filed in the student’s file in the Graduate office of Public Health Sciences.

School of Graduate Studies Final Oral Examination (FOE)

  • Click here to view Policies & Procedures, PhD
  • Click here to view the Procedures for Arranging PhD Defences

Current Student Profiles

Alumni profiles.

phd programs in toronto

Programs of study

Dive into your interests and develop your passions at U of T. We offer over 700 undergraduate and 200 graduate programs across three campuses in the Greater Toronto Area. From architecture to medicine, music to urban studies, we've got what you're looking for.

Search and filter programs

  Find the program that is the best fit for you. Selecting the “undergraduate” or “graduate” options will filter your results and refresh the page. You can also search programs by keyword.

The university makes every effort to keep this program list up to date. However, in the event of a conflict between the programs listed in a University of Toronto Academic Calendar and this list, the Calendar shall prevail. If you have any further questions about admissions and program offerings, please contact Enrolment Services . To update a program listing, please contact us via our Site Feedback form .

Doctoral Degrees

CTL graduates at OISE Convocation 2022.

Doctoral Degrees (PhD)

  • Flex-Time Doctoral Degrees

The Department of Curriculum, Teaching & Learning doctoral programs provide students with the opportunity to conduct cutting-edge original research in the field of education.

Doctor of Philosophy in Curriculum & Pedagogy

Doctor of philosophy in language & literacies in education, flex-time doctoral degree option.

This option allows students to pursue a PhD while continuing to work. It is available to professionals whose employment is closely related to their proposed area of study.

The program requirements of the flex-time PhD are the same as those for the full-time program. However, flex-time students are given more time to complete their degree and can take courses on a part-time basis. 

Applicants must demonstrate that they are currently employed and are active professionals engaged in activities relevant to their proposed program of study.

Stay Connected with the Department of CTL

Psychology (MA, PhD)

Part of the Faculty of Arts

Psychology student with baby on lap who is wearing an eeg tracking headset

Program Overview

Format : Full-time

Degree Earned : Master of Arts or PhD

Launched in 2007, this innovative program offers study in the fields of Psychological Science or Clinical Psychology under a core faculty trained at and recruited from top universities in Canada, the United States and around the world. In a department known for its experiential and career-focused learning, and with a curriculum anchored in real-world issues, the graduate program takes advantage of its downtown Toronto location to offer proximity to major sites for practicum training and clinical research, and world-class training opportunities. The department has more than 15,000 square feet of research and student training space designed from the ground up to meet the specialized research needs of the department.

Psychology PhD candidates Rachel Bar (left) and Fiona C. Thomas received Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarships in 2017. Photo by Clifton Li.

At a Glance

Admissions information.

  • Completion of a four-year undergraduate (or equivalent) degree in Psychology or related field (e.g., Applied Cognitive Science or Behaviour, Cognition and Neuroscience) from an accredited institution
  • As per the Graduate School policy, a minimum GPA or equivalent of 3.00/4.33 (B) in the last two years of study is required. However, due to the competitive application process, a minimum of 3.67/4.33 GPA (A-) is strongly recommended. Check the program's web page for further details.
  • Statement of interest
  • Transcripts
  • Two letters of recommendation
  • English Proficiency Test
  • An interview will be required for selected applicants
  • Completion of a master’s degree in psychology from an accredited institution
  • As per the Graduate School policy, a minimum GPA or equivalent of 3.33/4.33 (B+) in the last two years of study is required. However, due to the competitive application process, a minimum of 3.67/4.33 GPA (A-) is strongly recommended. Check the program's web page for further details.

Note:  The GRE test is no longer required as an admissions requirement effective fall 2021.

More information on  admission requirements . Please note this program is extremely competitive and spots are currently limited to qualified domestic applicants.  Potential International applicants are encouraged to contact the program before submitting an application.

Program-specific requirements

Check Application Deadline

Students are encouraged to submit applications prior to the first consideration date to increase their chances of securing financial support for their graduate studies. Applications received after the first consideration date will be accepted and reviewed based on spaces remaining in the program.

See application dates .

Financing Your Studies

For detailed graduate tuition and fees information please visit  Fees by Program .

For information on scholarships, awards and financing your graduate studies visit  Financing Your Studies.

Streams/Research Areas

  • Clinical Psychology (accredited by the Canadian Psychological Association)
  • Brain, Perception and Cognition
  • Community and Health Psychology
  • Lifespan Development
  • Social Psychology

Curricular Highlights

In addition to traditional course work and thesis/ dissertation milestones, students complete practicum placements where they apply their knowledge and skills. Some recent research and clinical practicum sites include:

  • Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care
  • Centre for Addiction and Mental Health
  • Duke University Medical Centre (North Carolina)
  • Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital
  • John Jay College of Criminal Justice (New York)
  • Ontario Correctional Institute
  • Pelly Crossing School (Yukon)
  • Toronto Rehabilitation Institute

Psychology (MA, PhD) graduate program calendar

  • The PRTC and Stress Institute features 31 dedicated research laboratories and groups; shared observation rooms; flexible interview, research and group therapy rooms; seminar and conference rooms; graduate student space; and offices.
  • Specialized research equipment and technology include EEG; psychophysiology, BioPac and BioLynx ambulatory systems; face/emotion capture and eye tracking; headmounted virtual reality with scenario suite; a sound attenuated chamber; and an assay laboratory.
  • The Clinical Psychology Program offers a unique practicum experience through its Psychology Training Clinic located within the St. Michael’s Hospital Family Health Team Clinic at 80 Bond Street. The Clinic is outfitted with state-of-the-art video recording equipment.

Graduate Admissions

Admissions information and how to apply

Graduate Studies Admissions Office 11th Floor, 1 Dundas Street West Toronto, ON Telephone: 416-979-5150 Email:  [email protected] For information specific to programs, please see the program contact information below.

Program Contacts

Dr. Todd Girard Graduate Program Director PhD, University of Waterloo Research areas: hippocampus; schizophrenia; memory; spatial cognition; fMRI; sleep-paralysis hallucinations Telephone: 416-979-5000 ext. 552646 Email: [email protected]

Sarah Carmichael Graduate Program Administrator Telephone: 416-979-5000 ext. 552178 Email:  [email protected]

“[TMU]’s Psychology program has provided me with the skills and opportunities to conduct high-level research that aims to change how we view sexual violence. The knowledge that my research has the potential to translate into clinical and policy recommendations to increase the safety of Canadians is incredibly rewarding.” Andrew Brankley, PhD student and Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship recipient (2014-17)

Student profile: Singing for your brain  (external link) 

Ella Dubinsky (psychology MA alumna and PhD student, and the university's 2017 3MT® winner and Canadian 3MT® finalist) explores using music to improve hearing in aging adults.

phd programs in toronto

Find curriculum, course descriptions and important dates for Psychology (MA, PhD).

phd programs in toronto

Once you’ve made an informed choice about which program(s) you are going to apply to, preparing your application requires careful research and planning.

At Toronto Metropolitan University, we understand that pursuing graduate studies is a significant financial investment. Funding comes from a combination of employment contracts (as a teaching assistant), scholarships, awards and stipends. There are a number of additional funding sources – internal and external – available to graduate students that can increase these funding levels.

As an urban innovation university, Toronto Metropolitan University offers 60+ cutting-edge, career-oriented graduate programs, as well as 125+ research centres, institutes and labs, in a wide range of disciplines. Our close connections with industry, government and community partners provide opportunities to apply your knowledge to real-world challenges and make a difference.

Logo

Universal Navigation

Universal navigation2.

  • Masters Programs of Study (MA & MSc)
  • PhD Program of Study
  • Application & Admissions
  • Funding & Fees
  • Resources for Prospective Students
  • QTBIPOC & International Student Admissions Peer Support Pilot Program
  • U of T Association of Geography Alumni (UTAGA)

Search form

phd programs in toronto

  • Graduate Geography
  • Prospective Graduate Students

PhD students work closely with a faculty supervisor(s), who is selected by the student at the time of admission, and with a Supervisory Committee. The Supervisory Committee consists of the supervisor(s) and at least two graduate faculty members (at least one of which must be appointed to geography). 

Program Requirements 

The department expectation is that PhD degrees will be completed on a full-time basis within four years of initial registration. The School of Graduate Studies requires that the thesis be submitted within six years of initial registration in the program.

Students enrolled in a PhD program are required to complete the requirements: coursework, annual progress reports, comprehensive exam, proposal exam, candidacy, internal thesis defense exam, and external final oral exam.

Coursework — Physical

Completion of 3 half-credit courses including:

  • the core course GGR1200H
  • one (1) half-credit course in geography
  • one (1) half-credit course in any subject

Students enrolled in a collaborative specialization should view the  Collaborative Specializations page  for any additional requirements.

Coursework — Human

Completion of 6 half-credit courses including:

  • the core course GGR1110H
  • two (2) half-credit courses in geography
  • one (1) half-credit course which must be taken outside the department
  • two (2) half-credit courses in any subject

Annual Progress Reports

The supervisory committee must meet at least once per academic year to review the student’s progress and plans for the following year.

Comprehensive Exam

Students will take a written and oral comprehensive exam between June of year one and no later than December of year two. See the  Examinations  page for further details. 

Proposal Exam

Students will defend a research proposal before their supervisory committee between June of year two and no later than September of year three. See the  Examinations  page for further details. 

The department requires students to achieve candidacy by the end of year two. A student can achieve PhD Candidacy and receive a notation on their transcript once they have completed three requirements: coursework, comprehensive exam, and proposal exam. School of Graduate Studies policy requires that candidacy is achieved by the end of year three.

Thesis Defense Exam

The thesis shall constitute a significant contribution to the knowledge of the field and must be based on original research conducted while registered for the PhD program. The topic for the thesis will have been approved at the proposal defense. The completed PhD thesis will be examined in a Departmental Thesis Examination. The examination committee consists of the supervisory committee. One or more additional members can be from outside the Department of Geography & Planning if required.  

See the  Examinations  page for further details. 

Final Oral Exam

The Final Oral Examination is the capstone experience of the PhD program. Students will defend their dissertation before an Examination Committee. In addition to the supervisor and other members of the supervisory committee, the Examination Committee will include an appraiser (external to the University), at least one graduate faculty member who has not been closely involved in the supervision of the thesis, and a chair designated by the School of Graduate Studies. 

For further details on the PhD program requirements above, please see the  Geography Graduate Handbook . 

  • About Graduate Geography
  • Current Graduate Geography Students
  • Graduate Geography Community
  • Request new password

Peter Loewen named dean of Arts and Sciences

College leadership

By | Tom Fleischman , Cornell Chronicle

More News from A&S

Person speaking into a megaphone

Personal crises reduce voter turnout, but may prompt other political action

Three people standing in a hall filled with dining tables; one speaks into a microphone

Merrill Scholars honor mentors who inspired them

Person working in a chemistry lab, pouring colored liquid from one beaker to another

Marginal students reap more benefits from STEM programs

Tree in bloom at sunrise

Three doctoral students selected for Department of Energy program

Peter Loewen

IMAGES

  1. University Of Toronto Computer Science Phd

    phd programs in toronto

  2. University Of Toronto Fully Funded PhD Programs In Public Health

    phd programs in toronto

  3. mirhr university of toronto

    phd programs in toronto

  4. Fully Funded PhD Programs in Civil Engineering

    phd programs in toronto

  5. Fully Funded PhD Programs in Electrical Engineering

    phd programs in toronto

  6. University Of Toronto Phd Programs

    phd programs in toronto

VIDEO

  1. University of Toronto: Noushin Nabavi, Cell and Systems Biology, PhD Candidate

  2. Toronto Impact Initiative

  3. PhD Student at UofT Reveals Findings on How Music Aids Stroke Patient Recovery: Anthonia Aina

COMMENTS

  1. Programs

    Here's a quick overview: More than 70 professional graduate programs in health sciences, management, engineering, and more. Approximately 140 combined degree programs. 14 dual degree programs. More than 40 collaborative specializations if you are interested in interdisciplinary studies. 4 diploma programs for professionals who would like to ...

  2. PhD

    Each year, the Rotman PhD program at the University of Toronto selects a small number of outstanding candidates who will go on to make significant contributions to management research and education. The admission selection process is highly competitive: on average only 15-20 doctoral students are admitted from a pool of 400-500 applicants.

  3. Management, PhD

    Program Overview. The Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto is home to Canada's premier management doctoral program, one of the top-ranked PhD programs in the world. The Rotman PhD program is a growing, vibrant, and intellectually rich environment for those interested in developing new insights in management.

  4. Professional and Graduate Programs

    A complete university degree is required for graduate programs. Biomedical Communications. A Faculty of Medicine program, biomedical communications offers an interdisciplinary graduate program in the design and evaluation of visual media in medicine and science. Length of Program: 2 Years Phone Number: 905.569.4849 Information: www.uoft.me ...

  5. Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

    A doctoral dissertation that demonstrates original and advanced research in computer science. Program Length: 4 years for PhD after a recognized Master's degree. 5 years for Direct Entry PhD after a Bachelor's degree. Guaranteed Funding Period: 43 months if master's degree was completed in this department.

  6. School of Graduate Studies

    The School of Graduate Studies ( SGS) team is here to help you feel prepared and ready to thrive at the University of Toronto. Explore the SGS GradHub to find the essential information you need at every phase of your graduate student journey. Visit GradHub. Visit UTogether.

  7. PhD Program Overview

    The PhD program requires between 4-6 years to complete, with the majority of students completing within 5 years. 87%* of students who begin the program complete the program and graduate with a PhD in Management. If you are considering a PhD in management at the University of Toronto's Rotman School, you are looking for an exceptional program ...

  8. Psychology

    Program Overview. Graduate training in psychology stresses training in general experimental psychology, leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree. Areas of specialization include the following: social and personality. For 2021-2022 admission cycle students will be considered for admission to PhD and direct-entry PhD programs only.

  9. PhD in Information

    Application & deadlines. Entry into the program occurs once a year, in September. The program is delivered in-person on campus. Apply via the University of Toronto School of Graduate Studies Online Admissions Application. Read the frequently asked questions about the online application. The application fee is $125 CAD per application.

  10. Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

    Program Requirements & Time for Completion. The program of study normally includes 2.0 FCE (four half-courses), including the weekly Graduate Research Seminar, the Graduate Ethics Seminar, and a thesis. In the PhD program, the departmental seminar comprises a minimum of two seminars presented to the academic staff/students of MSE.

  11. How to Apply

    Reach out to your Graduate Unit for more information about funding packages. For details about awards, scholarships and emergency funding, explore the opportunities. Doctoral-stream graduate programs at the University of Toronto offer a range of financial supports to graduate students to offset the cost of their graduate education.

  12. MD/PhD Program

    MD/PhD Program. Our MD/PhD Program, the largest national program of its kind, trains and mentors the next generation of physician scientists. Physician scientists are trained as medical doctors and scientists. They are in the unique position of pursuing both scientific research and clinical practice, translating academic excellence into health ...

  13. Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

    Entry into PhD program after completion of a bachelor's degree (i.e., direct entry): A four-year bachelor's degree in engineering, medicine, dentistry, physical sciences, or biological sciences, or its equivalent, with an average of at least 3.7 on a 4.0 grade point average scale (i.e., A minus) in the final two years of study from a recognized university; or

  14. Study PhD Programmes in Toronto, Canada

    The academic programmes in Toronto are mostly English-taught, but there are also numerous courses with French or mixed language instruction. Universities in Toronto offer the entire range of degree types, including Bachelors, taught Masters, research studies, PhDs, certificates, graduate diplomas, joint studies and online learning.

  15. PhD Program of Study

    The PhD program in Planning has 3 fields of specialization: City-regions in global context: economic development and social planning. Environment and sustainability planning. Urban development, design and the built environment. Our program is designed to provide students with a broad and critical knowledge of planning history, theory and ...

  16. PhD in Architecture, Landscape, and Design

    The Doctor of Philosophy in Architecture, Landscape, and Design (ALD PhD) at the Daniels Faculty is a rigorous interdisciplinary program that trains students to pursue research of the highest academic standard across a spectrum of built environmental practices. Through our highly adaptable curriculum—one that is unlike other PhD programs in ...

  17. PhD Program

    PhD Program. The Department of English at the University of Toronto offers two doctoral streams, the PhD program and the PhD U ("direct-entry") program. Admission to the doctoral streams is highly selective. The PhD Program Timeline and Policy on Satisfactory Progress should be reviewed by all students entering the doctoral programs on or ...

  18. Graduate Studies

    Welcome! The Department of Philosophy at the University of Toronto is the top-ranked philosophy program in Canada, and one of the leading philosophy departments in the world. With over 50 graduate faculty active in both teaching and research, we are able to offer supervision in all major areas of philosophy, as well as a broad range of graduate ...

  19. PhD: Epidemiology

    Degree Overview This program aims to develop excellent epidemiologists, able to work, teach and conduct research on contributors to health; disease, disability and death; and effective measures of prevention. Objective The overall goal of the program is to enable graduates to acquire the necessary scientific knowledge and methodological skills to become independent researchers in epidemiology

  20. Programs of study

    Programs of study. Dive into your interests and develop your passions at U of T. We offer over 700 undergraduate and 200 graduate programs across three campuses in the Greater Toronto Area. From architecture to medicine, music to urban studies, we've got what you're looking for.

  21. Doctoral Degrees

    Flex-Time Doctoral Degree Option. This option allows students to pursue a PhD while continuing to work. It is available to professionals whose employment is closely related to their proposed area of study. The program requirements of the flex-time PhD are the same as those for the full-time program. However, flex-time students are given more ...

  22. Psychology (MA, PhD)

    Program Overview. Format: Full-time. Degree Earned: Master of Arts or PhD. Launched in 2007, this innovative program offers study in the fields of Psychological Science or Clinical Psychology under a core faculty trained at and recruited from top universities in Canada, the United States and around the world. In a department known for its ...

  23. PhD Program of Study

    PhD Program of Study. PhD students work closely with a faculty supervisor (s), who is selected by the student at the time of admission, and with a Supervisory Committee. The Supervisory Committee consists of the supervisor (s) and at least two graduate faculty members (at least one of which must be appointed to geography).

  24. Peter Loewen named dean of Arts and Sciences

    Three doctoral students selected for Department of Energy program. Graduate student research. Coming from the University of Toronto, where he is the director of the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, Loewen begins his five-year appointment as the Harold Tanner Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences Aug. 1.